We Will Remember Them – Surnames M – R

We Will Remember Them
The Men & Women of East Elgin
Who Served
in the First Great War
1914 – 1918

Surnames M to R

INDRODUCTION

compiled by James L. McCallum

© Ontario Genealogical Society, Elgin County Branch

October 2010

Published by Ontario Genealogical Society, Elgin County Branch,

All rights reserved.  No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, or by any means – electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microform reproduction, recording, or otherwise – without the prior written permission of the publisher.

They shall grow not old, as we who are left grow old

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning

We will remember them

Laurence Binyon

William Joseph Maddocks (Maddox)

190238

William Maddocks was born on September 23, 1895 at Seaforth, Liverpool, England, the son of William James & Elizabeth Maddocks.  He emigrated to Canada about 1910 and settled in South Dorchester where he is found on the 1911 census living as a domestic servant with John & Sarah Thomson.

He was farming in the Mapleton area when he enlisted for service on April 8, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He gives his address as “care of Mrs. M. Doan, Mapleton”.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Maddox, 5 Springfield Street, Old Swan, Liverpool, England.

His attestation paper records that he was invalided to Canada for further medical treatment. Passenger lists show him arriving home from overseas at Halifax on September 29, 1917.  He had suffered a gun shot wound to his right arm.  The St. Thomas Daily Times of October 9, 1917 reports that Pte. W. J. Maddock, who had enlisted with the 91st Battalion and was wounded at Vimy Ridge had returned to St. Thomas. “This returned man expects to take treatment at London for some time prior to being discharged from the service”.

An article reporting his injury was printed in the St. Thomas Daily Times, April 25, 1917:

MAPLETON SOLDIER IS STRUCK BY A SHELL

Pte. W. Maddock of the 91st Battalion Had Arm Broken by Piece of Exploded Shell

Mapleton, April 25 – Pte. W. Maddock, who left St. Thomas with the 91st, has been wounded, and is now in England according to a letter received by Mrs. M. Doan, here, from Lt. J. W. Elders.  Lt. Elders wrote on March 30: “Pte. W. Maddock asked me to write you, as he won’t be able to write himself for some time. Yesterday he was wounded, a shell exploding part of it hitting his right arm, and breaking it.  By now he is on the way to England, where he will receive the very best of care and attention.  You need have no worries about him, for he is a game little fellow and his wounds will soon heal. Those who are looking after him will write for him”.

He was farming in Kingsmill when he was married on December 19, 1918 in St. Thomas to Pearl Levina Doan, a native of Mapleton living in Kingsmill, the daughter of Morris L. Doan & Sarah Jane Potts.

No further information is known.

Arthur Allan Mann

79353  Arthur Mann

Arthur Allan Mann was born on May 4, 1892 at Jarvis in Walpole Township in Haldimand County,  the son of Samuel Austin Mann (1857-1935) & Charlotte (Lottie) Sarah Freeman (1861-1939).  Samuel was born in Sparta, the son of Eli D. Mann & Catherine Grant, and was a painter living in Aylmer when he was married there on February 21, 1882 to Lottie Freeman, also of Aylmer, the daughter of William Freeman & Susan Ogilvie.  Samuel & Lottie are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  The family had been living in Aylmer in the 1880s, but had moved to Jarvis when Arthur was born.  They returned to Aylmer where they are found on the 1901 census.

Arthur enlisted for service on November 18, 1914. His occupation is given as a painter and trimmer.  He had one year’s experience in the Cadet Corps in Aylmer. His attestation paper is signed at “Pincher Creek”, which is in Alberta,  and is signed by an officer in the 31st Battalion.

When his brother James died in 1940, Arthur was living in Aylmer. No further information can be found.

A photograph  and article about Arthur appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 12, 1917:

CORPORAL ARTHUR MANN

Corporal Mann is a son of Mr and Mrs S. A. Mann, of this place.  He enlisted with a Western Battalion shortly after the war broke out, and landed in England in May, 1915.  After twenty-two months of faithful and competent service in the trenches Corporal Mann has been pronounced physically unfit for further trench duty, has received a distinguishing badge to that effect, and assigned to home guard duty in England.  Only three members of the company with which he enlisted are left.  More than once he was offered higher honors than Corporal, but as the promotion meant that he must leave his comrades, he refused the honor. Arthur is rather of an inventive turn of mind and several small inventions of his are now in use in France. One of them was a field telephone, by which the British could hear what was being said in the enemy trenches. During his long trench service he never received a scratch, but has had many narrow escapes, which he considers providential.  On one occasion he was buried above the waist by the bursting of a shell, but while others about him were shot down, he escaped injury, although he could not move and made a splendid mark for the enemy.  Several times a comrade had only just taken his place, when he was killed.

There is a letter from Arthur Mann that was published in the Aylmer Express, January 27, 1916. Although the introduction by the Express states he is a son of “Mr & Mrs J. Mann of this place”, it is believed that may have been a typographical error. The fact that this Arthur is writing to his brother James in Red Deer points to the fact that it is the above Arthur Mann.  The letter is as follows:

LETTER FROM ART MANN

James Mann of Red Deer, Alta., has received the following letter from his brother Arthur, who is at the front in Belgium, and we copy his letter from the Red Deer Advocate. Arthur, who enlisted in the west, is a son of Mr & Mrs J. Mann, of this place:

Belgium, Dec. 26, 1915:

Dear Jim –

It is the day after Christmas now and I am still going. Received your parcel yesterday and I was sure glad to get it.  This is the only one that has reached me so far. We sure did have a good time on Christmas day. There were about fifteen of us put in five francs each and bought a lot of eatables and made a table by laying our ground sheets on the floor of a barn with a pile of rifles in the centre and gathered a bunch of holly and trimmed it up. We had a pile of oranges and the rest was canned goods, peaches with condensed cream, lobster, salmon, pork and beans, sausages, roast beef, pickles and finished with plum pudding and Christmas cake, which came in different parcels.  We had cigars and finished the night by all the “boomers”and the band, what is left of it, joining in and having a time. Well, we had songs and music all night. The R.F.A. (Imperial Service) were with us. They are a fine bunch and have been here for fifteen months, so that we did not do so badly.  Of course Bill (meaning Billy Jackson) and Corp. Des George were here. When you find one, you find all the Red Deer boys. We go back to the trenches tomorrow, ready to meet Fritz, if he (has) taken an idea that he can get past us, but I am afraid he is out of luck when the 31st is in the trenches.

Arthur

Another letter from Arthur was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 16, 1916:

CANADIANS DON’T HAVE TO STAND BACK FOR ANY REGIMENTS ON THE FIELD

Another Aylmer Boy is making good in the service of his country – Corporal Arthur Mann, son of S. A. Mann, of this place, has written the following interesting letter to his uncle, Herb Freeman, of this place. Corporal Mann enlisted at Pincher Creek, Alberta, with the 31st Batt., two years ago the 7th of November.  He has been in the trenches fifteen months steady and has won two stripes.

Dear Uncle and All –

Received your letter today and was very glad to get it. You don’t know how much Canadian mail cheers a man up. I don’t think you are any worse than I am at writing, but I do manage to get a letter off to the folks once in awhile.  I have started to climb now.  I have two stripes to show, and that is worth forty in Canada. It took me over a year of hard work to get them, and believe me, I earned them. I am the only original one left in my section, so you see I am a lucky fellow. I must have someone pulling for me.

The Canadians don’t have to stand back now for any regiment in the field.  They are just as good as the best of them. We sure get the Hun on the run, and he knows enough not to stick around us very much.  I am feeling fine, only my feet are going back on me. Well, I must close with kind regards to all, 

Corp. Art. Mann

Arthur’s return from overseas was reported in the Aylmer Express, January 16, 1919, with a photograph and the following caption:

“Sergt. Arthur A. Mann, who with his bride returned from overseas on Monday last, and will spend a few weeks visiting his parents here, Mr and Mrs S. A. Mann. Sergt. Mann enlisted in Pincher Creek, Alberta, on August 23rd, 1914, twenty days after war was declared, and has seen over four years of service. He went overseas in May 1915, and was in France two years. He was wounded at Vimy Ridge, besides being blown up, and buried by a big shell at St. Eloi, when he was sent to England has been convalescing there for many months. His brother, James, who also enlisted in the early part of the war, is now in Germany with the army of occupation”.

A marriage registration in English records was found for an Arthur A. Mann and Ellen F. M. Pragnell in 1918.  

Daniel Webster Mann

190242

Daniel Mann was born on June 25, 1871 in Orwell, the son of John Mann (1834-1895) & Melissa Jane McConnell (1836-1914).  John & Melissa were both residents of Malahide and were married in 1855.  They are buried in Orwell cemetery.

Daniel was living in Sparta when he was married there on February 18, 1891 to Mary Sevilla Hewitt, a native of Port Bruce living in Sparta, the daughter of Edward & Henrietta Hewitt.  Daniel & Mary’s children were: Flossie May (1894); Carlos Daniel (born 1898; killed in action in 1917); Edward Augustus (1902); and Stanton Frederick (1907).

Daniel was a moulder living at 27 Woodworth Ave., St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on April 7, 1916 in St. Thomas.

No further information is known.

James Ivan Mann

883165  James Mann

James Mann was born on April 3, 1886 in Aylmer, the son of Samuel Austin Mann (1857-1935) & Charlotte (Lottie) Sarah Freeman (1861-1939).  Samuel was born in Sparta, the son of Eli D. Mann & Catherine Grant, and was a painter living in Aylmer when he was married there on February 21, 1882 to Lottie Freeman, also of Aylmer, the daughter of William Freeman & Susan Ogilvie.  Samuel & Lottie are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

James Mann moved to Alberta where he was living when he married Helen G. Stevenson (or Stephenson) in 1908 in Red Deer. Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, July 30, 1908, taken from the Red Deer Advocate, July 3rd: 

Two of Red Deer’s most popular and most highly esteemed young people, Mr. James Mann and Miss Helen Stephenson, were united in marriage at the Methodist Church on Tuesday morning at 10:30 by Rev. C. H. Huestis, the bride’s pastor. Councillor A. T. Stephenson gave away the bride, who was unattended. She was attired in her travelling dress of navy blue panama, with white broadcloth vest, her costume being completed by a white hat with white roses and white feather shading to blue to match the suit. After the ceremony the bridal party were entertained to breakfast by Mrs. A. T. Stevenson. Mr and Mrs Mann will spend their honeymoon at Calgary and Sylvan Lake. The bride was the recipient of many valuable gifts, among them a sewing machine and other useful gifts from the groom; a case of table cutlery from Illsey Bros., with whose store she has been associated for some years; and $40 in gold from the groom’s employers, Greene & Payne. The Epworth League also gave her a pretty china 5 o’clock tea set.

James was an accountant living in Red Deer when he enlisted for service on May 18, 1916 with the 187th Overseas Battalion, in Red Deer.  He had served 6 months in the 35th L. H. (Light Horse?).  James returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Quebec on June 4.

James died on May 21, 1940 at the age of 54.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 23, 1940:

“JIM” MANN DIED SUDDENLY IN EDMONTON

Son of the Late S. A. Mann, of Aylmer, Stricken with Heart Attack

Arthur A. Mann received a telegram on Tuesday announcing the death of his brother, James Ivan Mann, which occurred suddenly that morning following a heart attack, at his home in Edmonton, Alberta.  He had not previously been ill and the attack evidently came without warning.  “Jim” Mann was a son of the late Mr and Mrs S. A. Mann and was born in Aylmer and grew to manhood here, attending both the public and high schools.  He went to Alberta in 1908 and in 1914 enlisted and went overseas fighting the First Great War.  Upon returning to Edmonton in 1919 he was made manager and secured an interest in the operation of a coal mine, which position he held at the time of his death.  Two years ago he visited his mother here before her death, and called on old friends.  Surviving are his wife; two sons and one daughter, Ivan and Gordon, and Jean, all of Edmonton; one sister, Hazel Mann, Reg. N., of Edmonton, and one brother, Arthur A. Mann, of Aylmer.

Further details of his life were recorded in the May 30, 1940 issue of the Aylmer Express:

JAMES I. MANN WAS EDMONTON SPORTSMAN

Native of Aylmer Was Ill Only Three Hours

The Edmonton Journal has the following to say about the death of James I. Mann, a son of the late Mr and Mrs S. A. Mann, of Aylmer, who died suddenly on Tuesday morning, May 21st. Jim had his first and only heart attack at 4 a.m. and died at 7 a.m., just three hours later, in the hospital.  The Journal says:

“Manager of the Marcus Coal Co., and well known in curling and golfing circles, James Ivan Mann, 54, died suddenly after a short illness in a city hospital Tuesday. He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Jean, two sons, Ivan and Gordon, and one sister, Miss Hazel Mann, all of Edmonton, and one brother, Arthur, Aylmer, Ont.  Deceased curled at the Royal Curling Club and was a member of the Mayfair Golf Club. He was a former member of the Kiwanis Club.”

Louis Arthur Mann

189308

Louis Mann was born on March 29, 1897 in Orwell, the son of John W. Mann & Mary Eliza Schooley.  John was also born in Orwell, the son of John Mann & Lizzie McConnell, and was a farmer in Malahide when he was married in 1895 in St. Thomas to Mary Schooley, a native of Bayham living in Malahide, the daughter of Abraham Schooley & Eliza Johnston.  Mary was widowed, and was remarried to Stephen Lightburn.  She moved with her second husband to Ypsilanti, Michigan in 1915.  She died prior to the 1930 census.  Her son Louis Mann and daughter Louraine are found with them on the 1920 census in Ypsilanti.

Louis was a farmer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 8, 1915 in Aylmer. He was a member of the 30th Battery, C.F.A.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Louraine Mann, care of William Prouse.

A letter from Louis was printed in the Aylmer Express, October 4, 1917, incorrectly giving his name as “T. A. Mann”:

AYLMER MAN GETS AYLMER SOCKS

The following letter was received by the Travel Club last week:

France, July 29, 1917

Just a few lines to thank you very much for the Travel Club socks I received some time ago. I am sure such work as the women of Aylmer and surrounding districts are doing is something that will never be forgotten by the sons of Elgin county. I am from Aylmer myself. I do not think you knew me, but if you know Mrs. Wm. Prowse, she can tell you who I am. It will be nice to get back to our little Canadian farms once more. I could tell you some awful scenes we have been through, but of course we are not allowed to mention anything regarding military matters, and I realize it is best in these days of trial.

Thanking you ever so much for the trouble you people of Aylmer go to.

Pte. T. A. Mann, 189308, 2nd Batt. C.E.F., France

The writer of this letter proved to be a nephew of Mrs. Prowse, and the Travel Club have ordered a parcel sent to him from the C.F.C.C., parcel B., from the list shown in our window.”

The “Mrs. William Prowse” referred to in the letter was Geraldine Mann (1855-1924), wife of William Henry Prowse. She was a sister of Louis’ father.

Louis moved to Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Michigan in 1919 where he was living with his sister, mother and stepfather.  He was a farm labourer.

Louis was farming  in Belleville, Michigan when he was married on October 13, 1920 in Yarmouth to Dorothy Elson, a native of England living in Yarmouth, the daughter of Herbert Elson & Eliza Randall.

No further information can be found.

Morley Deloss Mann

3139224

Morley Mann was born on December 3, 1895 in Sparta, the son of Charles Mann (1870-1942) & Phoebe Fishleigh (1878-1903). Charles & Phoebe were married on January 23, 1895 in Aylmer.  He was the son of Noah & Elizabeth Mann, and was born and residing in Yarmouth.  Phoebe was also born and residing in Yarmouth, the daughter of Robert & Elizabeth Fishleigh. Morley’s brother, Arthur Birdsall Mann died on March 13, 1919 from wounds received in the war.  Phoebe is buried in Sparta South Cemetery.  Charles was remarried to Nora Ellsworth, and is buried with his second wife in Aylmer.

Morley was a machinist living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 24, 1918 in London.  

He was married to Sarah Barrett (1901-1985), and died on September 14, 1969.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  Two sons are also buried with them, Barrett Mann (1928-1961) and Keith Mann (1927-1946). His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 17, 1969:

MORLEY D. MANN

St. Thomas – Morley D. Mann, of 1244 Talbot Street, died in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Sunday, September 14, after a lengthy illness, in his 74th year.  Born in Sparta, he had operated a body shop on St. Catherines Street until 1950, and then an appliance business on Talbot Street.  He was a member of Branch 41 of the Royal Canadian Legion, St. Thomas.

Son of the late Charles and Phoebe (Fishleigh) Mann, he is survived by his wife, the former Sarah (Pat) Barrett.  He was predeceased by sons Keith and Barrett Mann, his stepmother, the former Nora Ellsworth, and a brother, Arthur.

Rested at the Williams Funeral home, St. Thomas, for service Wednesday afternoon. Rev. Barry Thomas, of Yarmouth Centre United Church officiated. Interment was in Aylmer Cemetery.

William Beecher Mann

487531

William Beecher Mann was born on September 18, 1883 in Aylmer, the son of William H. Mann (1849-1887) & Mary Dancey (1850-1900).  “Beecher” Mann is found on the 1891 census in Aylmer with his widowed mother Mary.  W. H. Mann was the son of Eli Mann & Catherine Grant, and was a mechanic living in Aylmer when he was married on March 4, 1873 in London to Mary Dancey, also of Aylmer, the daughter of  Edward & Almyra Dancey.  W. H. & Mary are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

William Beecher Mann moved to Swift Current, Saskatchewan and was living there when he was married in August 1908 to Gertrude Matthews.

He was living in Swift Current, a retail merchant, when he enlisted for service on February 9, 1916 in Montreal. He enlisted with the 5th Overseas Universities Co., C.E.F.

He died on August 28, 1921 in Swift Current at the age of 38.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 22, 1921:

BEECHER MANN DIED AT SWIFT CURRENT

Was Native of Aylmer and Successful Business Man in Saskatchewan

Relatives and friends in Aylmer were shocked to learn of the death of W. Beecher Mann at Swift Current, Sask. The following concerning the deceased is from the Swift Current Herald, of September 1st:

“St. Stephen’s Church was filled to overflowing Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 on the occasion of the last sad rites being performed by the rector, Rev. H. C. H. Gibson, over the remains of the late W. Beecher Mann, whose death came with startling suddenness at the General Hospital on Sunday evening at 9 o’clock after only a short illness from organic trouble. The body was taken from the family residence to the church for the service ceremony, after which the funeral cortege, one of the longest seen in this city for some time, proceeded to Mount Pleasant cemetery, where the interment took place. Besides a large representation from among the citizens generally, the members of the Kiwanis club and the Great War veterans, two of the organizations in which the late Mr. Mann was particularly active, turned out in force.  The pallbearers were Messrs. R. T. Graham, J. E. Hemenway, C. McKenzie, J.E.H. Laidlaw, Dr. R. A. Ross and E. E. Delany.

Many and beautiful were the floral contributions that banked the handsome casket, and which paid silent yet expressive tribute of the high esteem in which the deceased was held by his many friends both at home and abroad. Being himself one of the early residents of Swift Current, a fine token of remembrance, in the shape of a great wreath, was tendered the deceased by a number of old-timers of the city and vicinity.

The late Mr. Mann, familiarly known as “Beecher”, was a native of Aylmer, Ont., and was 38 years of age. He came to this city in 1906 and in that year effected a partnership with Ed. McKenzie, forming the clothing firm of McKenzie & Mann, which has flourished ever since.  In the days when real estate was active the partners engaged in a number of conservative and profitable investments. At the time the 209th battalion was being recruited, Mr. Mann was enthusiastic in war activities and later joined the Princess Pats and went overseas as a private. Being not very strong constitutionally his health suffered from the rigors of the service and since his return he was known to suffer at times from organic complaint. In the days before the war Mr. Mann was keenly interested in athletic sports and was particularly interested in promoting baseball activities in the city. His affable disposition, warm sympathy and keen with won him many life-long friends in Swift Current and the district.

He leaves to mourn his loss, a widow, and two children, Kenneth, 11 years old, and Madeline, aged 15 months. Although he had been ailing for some time his sudden demise was unexpected, as he was up around only a few hours previous to the summons to the beyond. A tragic feature was the fact that Mrs. Mann, who was enroute home with the children from a visit to Victoria, was not aware of her husband’s illness and death until her arrival at the station here at noon on Monday”.

Mr. Sam Mann, of this place, is an uncle, and deceased was a grandson of the late Dr. Dancey, of Aylmer.

Thomas Mansfield

The name Thomas Mansfield appears on a Springfield Roll of Honor.  This man cannot be positively identified.  There are seven attestation papers bearing this name, but only two are from Ontario. There is a Thomas Mansfield in the 1911 census in Blandford Township, Oxford County, a labourer, born February 1878 in England, who emigrated in 1909.

One attestation paper found was for a Thomas Mansfield, #406356.  He was born on February 25, 1877 in Barton on Trent, Staffordshire, England.  He names his next of kin as his mother, S. Mansfield, of 325 Jamell South, Hamilton.  He was a labourer and was not married. He belonged to the 19th Lincoln Regiment, and had served 12 years in the 12th Yorkshire regiment.  He enlisted for service on April 14, 1915 in Hamilton.

The above Thomas Mansfield died on July 21, 1921 in Brant Hospital, Burlington, Ont., where he had been a patient for 146 days.  His death record states he was married, and was 43 years old.  He was born in England on February 25, 1878.  His occupation is given as C.E.F. from March 13, 1915 to June 15, 1919.  His parents were Thomas Mansfield & Sarah Goodgame, both born in England.  The informant on the death registration was Mrs. Thomas Mansfield, widow, of 53 -34th Street, Mount Hamilton.  He is buried in Hamilton cemetery.

It is possible that this man was employed in the Springfield area prior to the 1911 census. Two death notices for Thomas appear in the Hamilton Spectator, July 22, 1921:

MANSFIELD – At the Brant Home, Burlington, on Thursday, June 21, 1921, Pte. T. W. Mansfield, aged 43 years. Funeral from his sister’s residence, 136 Duke Street, Monday at 2 o’clock. Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

THOMAS MANSFIELD

Thomas Mansfield, a highly esteemed resident of this city, passed away at an early hour this morning. Deceased was born in England. He is survived by his widow. The funeral will take place from his late residence, 136 Duke street, Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock to Hamilton Cemetery.

Clarke Joseph Marlatt

189342

Clarke Marlatt was born on August 23, 1884 in Vienna in Bayham, the son of George A. Marlatt (1831-1899) & Betsy Ann Corless (1843-1923).  George was born in Yarmouth, the son of Joseph & Elizabeth Marlatt, but was living in Bayham when he was married there on February 4, 1862 to Elizabeth (Betsy) Ann Corless, a native and resident of Bayham, daughter of Jesse & Hannah Corless.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Clarke was living in Aylmer employed as a steam engineer when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on February 14, 1915 in Aylmer.  He names his next of kin as his mother, also of Aylmer.

Clarke was married to Olive Blanche Coleman (1900-1939).  He died on March 28, 1943 and is buried with his wife in Sparta (South) Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 1, 1943:

CLARK J. MARLATT

Clark Joseph Marlatt, of St. Thomas, died at his home on Sunday morning following a sudden heart attack. He was a native of Vienna and was 56 years of age. He was engaged in carpentry work. Mr. Marlatt had lived in Aylmer for six years and had been in California for a period of 19 years. He was an adherent of the Baptist church.

His parents were the late Betsy Ann Corless and Alexander Marlatt, and he was also predeceased by his wife, Olive Blanche Coleman, who died four years ago. He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Clara Mann, Sparta; and one nephew, R. D. Marlatt, Portland, Oregon.

The funeral was held from the Sifton Funeral Home on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. in charge of Rev. G. W. Sherman of Sparta. Interment in Sparta cemetery.

George Louis Marshall

190283  George Marshall

George Marshall was born on July 20, 1891 in Corinth, the son of William Marshall (1852-1927) & Rebecca Dickie (1856-1942).  William was the son of Stephen & Catherine Marshall, and was a farmer living in Bayham when he was married on October 29, 1875 in Vienna to Rebecca Dickie, also of Bayham, the daughter of Robert & Rachel Dickie.  They are buried in Dobbie Cemetery, Bayham township.

George was a telegraph operator living at Corinth when he enlisted with the 91st Battalion on April 18, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He joined the signalling section. 

Following the war, he returned to Corinth where he was farming when he was married on September 3, 1919 in Orillia to Mabel Brittain Cooper, of Orillia, the daughter of Dennis Campbell Cooper & Margaret Brittain.

George died in 1968 in his 77th year, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Cayuga.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 20, 1968:

GEORGE L. MARSHALL

George L. Marshall of Cayuga died in the West Haldimand General Hospital in Hagersville recently in his 77th year. Born in Bayham Township, he was the son of the late William and Rebecca Marshall.

Surviving are his wife, the former Mabel Cooper and two daughters, Mrs. Jack (Margaret) Elliott of Pickering and Mrs. Donald (Patricia) Meadows of London. Sisters Mrs. Jessie Milmine of Richmond and Mrs. Kenneth (Grace) Firby of Shedden and seven grandchildren.

Rested at the Kee Funeral Home in Cayuga where service was held.  Interment in the Riverside Cemetery, Cayuga.  Mr. Marshall was also a recent resident of Brownsville and Corinth.

Benjamin Martin

401694  Benjamin Martin

Benjamin Martin was born on February 26, 1894 in Peters, Marland, North Devon, England, the son of Frederick & Lily Martin.  The family is found on the 1901 census living at #7 Erskine St. Midland Pl., Birmingham, Aston Parish, Warwickshire.  Frederick is employed as a railway room keeper and both he and his wife were born in Little Torrington, Warwickshire.

He emigrated to Canada in 1914, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Canada, arriving in Quebec on June 8. The passenger list states his occupation in England was steam threshing, and his intended destination is Aylmer where he will be a farm labourer. 

Benjamin enlisted for service on September 24, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He was a farm labourer, and names his next of kin as his father, Frederick Martin, of 1 York Place, Ada Road, SmallHeath, Birmingham, England.

While overseas, he was married in Birmingham, England on October 2, 1917 to H. C. Ethel Bennett (1895-1974). Following the war, he returned to the Aylmer area with his wife.

Benjamin died on December 28, 1968 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.  In addition to the family monument, a military marker is found in the plot bearing the following inscription:

“Benjamin Martin Pte. 4 Batt’n C.E.F.  V.G. of Canada 28 Dec 1968 age 74″

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 8, 1969:

BENJAMIN MARTIN

Benjamin Martin of Aylmer died Saturday, Dec. 28, 1968, at Westminster Hospital in London after a lengthy illness. He was 74.  Mr. Martin was a retired general farmer who was born in Devonshire, England. He came to Canada in 1913 and spent all his civilian time in the Aylmer area. He was a member of Trinity Anglican Church.

In the First World War he served in the Fourth Battalion of Canadian Infantry, and in the Second World War he was in the Veterans’ Guard. He was a charter member of Col. Talbot Br. 81, Royal Canadian Legion, here.

Mr. Martin was the son of the late Mr and Mrs Frederick Martin.  He is survived by his wife, the former Ethel Bennett; son, Frederick, Aylmer; daughter, Mrs. Fred (Ruth) Kristoff, RR 2 Aylmer; three sisters, Mrs. Frances Kimber, Mrs. Annie Pearman and Mrs. William (Ruth) Mullett, all in England; seven grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

The Rev. Ronald Matthewman conducted the service Tuesday afternoon at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home. Mrs. Don Ingram played the organ.  Burial was in Aylmer cemetery. The pallbearers were Jack Harvey, John Rimnyak, Gordon Pearce, W. O. Callaghan, William Matheson and Bert Hemphill.  Relatives and friends were in attendance from London, Clinton, Aylmer and district.

Frederick Wesley Martin

2010325

Frederick Martin was born on April 19, 1899 in Rodney, Ontario, the son of Frederick Ernest Martin (1871-1958) & Ada Theresa Woolley (1870-1967).  Frederick Ernest Martin was born in England, the son of Fred & Sara Ann Martin, and was a cheesemaker living in Aldborough township when he was married on March 10, 1897 in South Dorchester to Ada Woolley, of South Dorchester, the daughter of John Wesley Woolley & Melinda Hegler.  They are buried in Springfield cemetery.

Frederick was a farmer living at Springfield when he enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on July 24.

He was married on August 27, 1923 in Springfield to Florence Ellen (Nellie) Foster (1904-1995), daughter of John H. Foster of Springfield.

Frederick died on May 25, 1965 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery, with a son Wesley Martin (1924-1964).

Fred’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 26, 1965:

Fred W. Martin

A resident of the Springfield area for many years and active as an Odd Fellow, Fred W. Martin died in St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital Tuesday morning in his 67th year.  Mr. Martin was a son of Mrs. Ada Martin of Springfield and the late Ernest Martin. He was born in Aldborough Township and had farmed all his adult life.  He was a member of Ark Lodge No. 404 I.O.O.F., Springfield; of St. John’s United Church, Springfield; and a veteran of World War I, serving overseas.  Surviving are his wife, the former Florence Foster; one son, Roy Martin of R.R. 3 St. Thomas; his mother, Mrs. Ada Martin, Springfield; a brother, Carl, of R.R. 3 Waterford; and six grandchildren.  One son, Wesley Martin, died last December.  The Rev. Henry Macdougall of St. John’s Church will conduct the service at the Ross Shaw Funeral Home in Springfield on Thursday at 2 p.m. Burial in Aylmer cemetery.

James E. Martin

James Martin was born on July 29, 1870 in Springfield, the son of James E. Martin (1836-1923) & Sarah Catherine Wise (1842-1884). James Martin Sr. was the son of William Martin & Jane Millard and was married on December 15, 1859 in Lambton County to Sarah Wise, of Brooke Township, daughter of Benjamin Wise & Mary Pepper.  The family appears on the 1881 census in South Dorchester.  James Sr. died in 1923 in Fort William.  His death registration states he is buried in Fort William, but his name appears on the family monument in Aylmer cemetery with his wife.

James E. Martin was a physician and enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps as a Captain on October 4, 1915. He was married, and names his next of kin as his wife Mrs. Nellie M. Martin of Fort William, Ontario.

James & Nellie are found on the 1911 census in Fort William, where he is a physician.  There are no children listed with them.  Nellie was born in the United States and came to Canada in 1904.

No further information is known.

Norman Roy Martin

324884  Norman Martin

Norman Martin was born on May 16, 1890 at Springfield in South Dorchester, the son of Giles Martin (1861-1946) & Esther Hewer (1868-1928).  Giles was born in England, the son of James & Susan Martin, and was living in South Dorchester when he was married on August 7, 1889 in Aylmer to Esther (Etta) Hewer, of South Dorchester, daughter of John & Anna Hewer.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Norman was a student in Guelph when he enlisted for service on March 14, 1916 in Guelph.  He was discharged from service in May 1916.

Norman moved to Burwash, Sudbury District where he was employed as the superintendent of an Industrial Farm when he was married on June 27, 1917 in Stirling, Ontario to Florence Bissonnette of Stirling, the daughter of Dr. Julian D. Bissonnette & Anne Hume.

Norman died on December 6, 1955 and is buried in Elmdale cemetery, St. Thomas with his wife Florence (1888-1972). 

His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, December 6, 1955:

NORMAN R. MARTIN PASSES SUDDENLY
PUBLIC SPIRITED MAN A NATIONAL FIGURE

Norman R. Martin, known throughout the Dominion of Canada for his interest and activity in the dairy cattle industry and recognized in his native Elgin County as a valued and public-spirited citizen, died suddenly at his home, 82 Elgin street, St. Thomas, Monday afternoon. Mr. Martin was the 1954 president of the Holstein-Friesian Association of Canada and was this year’s president of the Associated Milk Foundations of Canada and a director of the Dairy Farmers of Canada.

Mr. Martin had not been in the best of health for some time but he had been around as usual and the news of his unexpected death, which followed a heart attack, came as a great shock to his numerous friends and business associates.

Graduate of the O.A.C.

Mr. Martin was born in South Dorchester 65 years ago, a son of the late Giles and Esther Martin, early residents of that township. He received his early education in the local schools and later attended the Ontario Agricultural College, graduating in 1916. During his course at the O.A.C., he took a year off to act as a County agricultural agent in the State of Virginia, gaining a great deal of practical experience. He also spent one summer as assistant agricultural representative in Hastings County and during World War I enlisted with the O.A.C. 56th Battery, but an injury prevented his going overseas.

Shortly after his graduation he was appointed superintendent of the Industrial Farm at Burwash, Ont., filling that post with excellent administrative skill for two years when he resigned to return home to form a partnership with his father, following the accidental death of his brother.

Bought Yarmouth Farms

Mr. Martin and his father continued to farm in South Dorchester and to specialize in Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle until 1934, when they purchased Fairlea farm, on the Edgeware Road in Yarmouth, a mile north of Yarmouth Centre, this partnership continuing until the death of his father in 1947. A partnership with his sons, Robert and Julien, followed and with these two energetic young men for a number of years farmed 360 acres and kept the nationally famed Holstein herd intact. In February of this year Mr. Martin’s failing health necessitated his retirement in favor of his sons.

Fine Record of Service

Mr. Martin’s record of public service is notable and extensive. His proven capabilities and the willingness to serve resulted in his being called upon to fill positions of trust in the Community. He sat for a number of years on the South Dorchester Council and contested two elections, one provincial, the other federal in the interests of the Conservative party. A speaker of ability and with a keen grasp of public affairs, he made a most creditable run in 1937 against Hon. M. F. Hepburn, then at the height of his power as premier of Ontario, and again in 1940 for the Dominion House against the formidable Wilson H. Mills.  In both campaigns he carried the Conservative banner with credit both to himself and to his party. He had also served as president of the Elgin Conservative Association.

In other respects Mr. Martin did not shirk his duty as a citizen. He had been a director and past president of Elgin Co-Operative Services, of the Elgin Holstein Club, the St. Thomas Milk Producers and the first chairman of the Elgin County Dairy Cattle show.

S. Superintendent 15 Years

A member of the United Church of Canada, he, along with Mrs. Martin, were prominent for years in the work of the church at Yarmouth Centre, Mr. Martin being superintendent of the Sunday School there for fifteen years. Since taking up their residence in St. Thomas about three years ago he and Mrs. Martin have been identified with the First United Church, where Mr. Martin was a member of the Session.

In recognition of his work as chairman of the Agricultural committee and as a director of the St. Thomas Kiwanis Club he was elected to honorary membership in that service organization.  He is a past worshipful master of the Springfield Masonic Lodge.  One of the positions filled by him was that of chairman for Yarmouth township of the Canadian Red Cross during the war period. The Yarmouth branch was one of the most active in the county.

The Surviving Relatives

Mr. Martin was married in 1917 to Florence Bissonnette, daughter of the late Dr. J. E. and Mrs. Bissonette of Stirling, Ont., who survives, along with one daughter, Mrs. Watson (Esther) Younie, of St. Catharines; two sons, Robert N., and Julien G. Martin, both of the Edgeware Road, Yarmouth; a sister, Mrs. Thomas (Eva) Hume, R.R. 2 Springfield, and five grandchildren.

At rest at the P. R. Williams and Son Funeral Home until Thursday morning when removal will be made to the First United Church, where funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. R. B. Craig, pastor of the church. Interment will be in Elmdale Memorial Park.

Walter Leslie Martin

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Walter Martin was born on June 8, 1894 in Springfield, the son of Arthur R. Martin (1866-1953) & Eliza E. Sherk (1863-1935).  Arthur was born in England, the son of James & Susan Martin, and was living in South Dorchester when he was married on December 15, 1890 in Springfield to Eliza Sherk, a native of Humberstone Township, but living in South Dorchester, the daughter of Noah & Esther Sherk. Arthur & Eliza are buried in Courtland Fellowship Baptist Cemetery, Courtland, Ontario.

Walter was a farmer living in Middleton Township, Norfolk County when he was married on September 19, 1917 in Ingersoll to Lillian Belle Hevenor (1896-1971), a native of South Dorchester living in Ingersoll, the daughter of Uriah Hevenor & Mary Ann Lents.

Walter was farming at RR #3 Delhi when he enlisted for service on May 1, 1918 in Hamilton.

He died on July 19, 1985 in Tillsonburg and is buried with his wife in Tillsonburg Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, July 22, 1985: [while his obituary states he was born in Middleton Township, his birth registration states South Dorchester]

WALTER LESLIE MARTIN

Walter Leslie Martin of 5 Frank St., Tillsonburg, passed away at Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Friday, July 19, 1985, in his 92nd year.  Born in the former Middleton Township, Norfolk County, June 8, 1894, he was a son of the late Arthur Martin and the former Liza Sherk.  He had resided in the Tillsonburg area all his life, and was a farmer, retiring in 1965. Mr. Martin was a charter member of North Broadway Baptist Church. His wife, the former Lillie Bell Hevenor, predeceased him November 29, 1971.

Surviving is one son, Ross Martin of Woodstock; one daughter, Mrs. Edna Scott of Wallaceburg; nine grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren.  He was predeceased by three brothers Charles, Harvey and Ernest.

Rested at the H. D. Verhoeve Funeral Home, Tillsonburg, where service was held in the chapel on Monday, July 22 at 1:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. Gary Landers of North Broadway Baptist Church. Interment in Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

Harold Campbell Mason

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Harold Mason was born on November 2, 1895 in Bayham, the son of Thomas Henry Mason (1858-1946) & Minnie Campbell Baskett (1865-1906).  Thomas was the son of William W. & Sarah Mason and was farming at Eden when he was married on January 14, 1891 in St. Thomas to Minnie Baskett, who was born at Fingal and living in St. Thomas, the daughter of Caleb & Julia Baskett.  They are buried in Eden cemetery.

Harold was a student living at 120 Hawthorne Ave., Ottawa when he enlisted for service on June 8, 1917 in Ottawa.  He had served three months in the 253rd Highland Battalion. Harold returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Portland, Maine on April 10. He was convalescing from a gunshot wound in the thigh.

Following the war, Harold moved to Guelph where he was a lecturer at the Ontario Agricultural College when he was married on May 31, 1923 at Sterling in Hastings County to Lena Mabel McIntosh, a native of Williamsburg Township, living in Sterling, the daughter of Arza D. McIntosh & Katherine Maria Barkley.

Harold died on September 1, 1976 and is buried in Pond Mills Cemetery, London

Henry Mather

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Henry Mather was born on January 5, 1901 in Dereham Township, Oxford County, the son of Amary (1859-1923) & Susan Adelia Mather.  His birth was recorded by delayed registration, and the information was sworn by his aunt, Mary Sprague of Simcoe in 1932.

Henry appears to have enlisted underage on February 14, 1916 in Simcoe.  He belonged to the 30th Regiment, and was living in Delhi.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Ethel Mather, also of Delhi.  He states he was born at Avon on January 5, 1897.

The family moved to Windham Township, Norfolk County, where they are found on the 1911 census.  Henry’s father died in Delhi in 1923, and his name is spelled “Omersey” on the death registration. The information was supplied by his son Henry, of R.R. #6 Simcoe.  He is buried in Salem United cemetery in Charlotteville Township, but a monument cannot be found. Omersey was the son of John Mather & Mandy Starks.

Henry returned from overseas in 1917, arriving on January 29 in St. John, New Brunswick. His address is given as Courtland.

No further information could be found.

Eva Clare Matthews

Nursing Sister

Eva Matthews was born on April 22, 1890 in Malahide, the daughter of John W. Matthews (1858-1928)  & Loretta Pennington (ca 1864-1945).  John was born at Lyons, the son of Henry Matthews & Mary Waters, and was married on September 20, 1882 to Loretta Pennington, a native of Crossley, Michigan, daughter of Miles & Mary Pennington.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Eva was living at 505 Oxford Street, London, Ontario employed as a nursing sister when she enlisted for service in 1918 in London with the C.A.M.C.  Her father was living at R.R. #1 Dunboyne.

Eva was considered to be medically unfit for the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Forces on December 12, 1918.  She was married on December 25, 1924 to Herman A. Hebding of Detroit, and they are found there on the 1930 census.  Her occupation is given as a nurse.

Gordon Winfield Matthews

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Gordon Matthews was born on November 14, 1895 at Kinglake in Houghton Township, Norfolk County, the son of Fred Matthews & Maud Harvey.  Fred was born in Houghton, the son of Cyrus & Jane Matthews, and was farming in Malahide when he was married on October 29, 1894 in Aylmer to Maud Harvey, of Houghton, the daughter of John & Bell Harvey.

Gordon enlisted for service on September 26, 1914 at Valcartier.  He was a telephone linesman, and states he was born at Vienna.  He names his next of kin as Fred Matthews of Langruth P.O., Manitoba, but his relationship is not given.

No further information can be found.

Harold Brock Matthews

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Harold Matthews was born on May 21, 1883 in Vienna, the son of Harvey J. Matthews (1826-1908) & Catherine Pilkey (1839-1907). Harvey was a wagon/carriage maker and the family is found on the 1891 census in Vienna.  They later moved to Sparta where Harvey & Catherine died.  They are buried in Sparta cemetery.

He was a carpenter living in St. Thomas when he was married there on December 30, 1908 to Erie Hazel Seburn (1890-1935), the daughter of Thomas J. Seburn & Susan Gilbert. Harold & Erie are found on the 1911 census in St. Thomas living with her parents.

Harold & Erie were living at 943 Talbot Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service there on November 8, 1915 with the 91st Battalion.

Harold died on September 1, 1960 and is buried with his wife in Elmdale Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 2, 1960:

HAROLD B. MATTHEWS DIES IN HAMILTON

HAMILTON – Harold Brock Matthews, C. L.U., husband of Mrs. Sybel (Kendall) Matthews died on Thursday at his home, 331 Locke street south, in his 78th year. He was formerly superintendent of the London Life Insurance Company, a member of Murton Lodge of Perfection A. & A.S.R., past patron of Iris Chapter O.E.S., past watchman of Hamilton Shrine, Number 6.

He leaves his wife, a son, Wray, of Toronto; two sisters, Mrs. Cyrenus Walker (Lorinda), of Norwich; Mrs. Mark McMaster (Lois), London, Ont.; also two grandchildren.

The remains are resting at the J. B. Marlatt Funeral Home in Hamilton. Service will be conducted in Marlatt’s Memorial Chapel Tuesday at 12 o’clock noon. Interment will be made in St. Thomas cemetery.

Harry Lloyd Matthews

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Harry Matthews was born on April 9, 1894 in Aylmer, the son of Mahlon E. Matthews (1864-1935) & Alberta Johnson.  Mahlon was born in Malahide, the son of Emanuel & Eliza Matthews, and was a clothier living in Aylmer when he was married on October 1, 1884 in St. Thomas to Alberta Johnson, daughter of George & Alice Johnson.  She was born in Tillsonburg, and living in Aylmer when married.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Aylmer, where Mahlon is a painter. On the 1911 census Harry is living in Aylmer with his aunt Adeline Harris and his grandmother Eliza C. Matthews.  Mahlon & Alberta had moved to Winnipeg, where they are found there on the 1911 census living at 291 Young Street.

Harry later followed his parents to Winnipeg, and was living with them at 516 Home Street, Winnipeg when he enlisted for service on August 6, 1918.  He was employed as a department manager.

When his father died in 1935, Harry was living in Calgary.

Mahlon Eugene Matthews

871285

Mahlon Eugene Matthews was born in Malahide on November 23, 1869, the son of Emanuel (Manly) Matthews (1837-1870) & Eliza C. Weese (1843-1913). Mahlon is found with his widowed mother on the 1871 census in Malahide.

Mahlon was a clothier living in Aylmer when he was married on October 1, 1884 in St. Thomas to Alberta Johnson, a native of Tillsonburg living in Aylmer, the daughter of George & Alice Johnson.  Mahlon & Alberta are found on the 1891 and 1901 census in Aylmer, where he is a painter.  By 1911, they had moved to Winnipeg and are found on the census there living at 291 Young Street. Their children were: Ella, Jean, Harry, George and Graydon.

Mahlon was living at 516 Home Street in Winnipeg when he enlisted for service there on February 25, 1916.  He was a painter and decorator and names his next of kin as his wife, Alberta.

Mahlon died on March 13, 1935 in Edmonton. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 21, 1935:

MAHLON MATTHEWS DIED IN EDMONTON

Decorator in Aylmer For Years

Relatives here received word last week of the death of Mahlon E. Matthews, which occurred at his home in Edmonton, Alberta, on Wednesday afternoon, March 13th.  He was born in Malahide township and for many years lived in Aylmer where he carried on a business as a decorator. With his family he left Aylmer for Winnipeg twenty years ago, and later moved to Edmonton. He was a member of the United Church, and a Reformer in politics.  He was one of the oldest members of Aylmer Lodge No. 94, I.O.O.F., having joined on Sept. 3rd, 1901.

He is survived by his widow, Alberta M. Johnson, formerly of Aylmer; one daughter, Mrs. Wm. Freeman, Edmonton; three sons, Harry, of Calgary; George W., of Port Arthur; and Greydon A., of Winnipeg.  Mrs. Ella Bassett and Mrs. Charles Brown, Aylmer, are sisters-in-law of the deceased. A daughter, Ella (Mrs. Alvah O’Brien) predeceased her father in 1908.  Burial took place in Edmonton on Friday.

Charles Gordon May

2591023

Gordon May was born on October 16, 1887 in Aylmer, the son of Charles Philip May (1854-1925) & Emma Catherine (Kate) Light.  Charles was the son of George & Sophia May, and was living in Aylmer when he was married there on July 22, 1886 to Catharine Light, also of Aylmer, the daughter of Frank & Sarah.  

Gordon was living at 117 Maple Street, London working as a barber when he enlisted for service on September 25, 1917 in London.  He had served two years as a bugler in the 7th Regiment Fus., and 1 ½ years in the Michigan State Guard.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Kate Bullie, of 448 Clay Ave., Detroit.

Gordon returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on September 19.  He moved to Blenheim, again working  as a barber, when he was married on December 5, 1919 in London to Mary Catherine Price, a native of Athens, Ohio living in Blenheim, the daughter of John Price & Frances Latimer.  He later returned to the Aylmer area.

Gordon died on September 28, 1941 in his 54th year and is buried in Aylmer Cemetery.  A military marker with the following inscription is found there:

C.A.S.C.  C.R.O.  C.E.F.  Pte. Gordon May 1887-1941

Gordon’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 2, 1941:

GORDON MAY

Gordon May, well-known resident of Malahide Township, and a native of Aylmer, passed away early Sunday morning, Sept. 28th, at his home, half mile south of Orwell.  He had been in ill health for about two months, but had been well enough to attend Aylmer Fair last Wednesday. Mr. May was in his 54th year and was born in Aylmer where he attended school and had resided until two years ago when he moved to Malahide.  He was a son of the late Charles May.  Mr. May was a decorator and painter by trade.

Surviving are his wife; one son, Junior, at home; his mother, Mrs. K. Bullus, of Detroit; one brother, Will May, of Aylmer; and one sister, Mrs. S. Maillaney, of Detroit.

The funeral was held at the Atkinson Funeral Home, Aylmer, on Tuesday afternoon and was largely attended. Some beautiful flowers surrounded the casket, composed of wreaths, baskets, pillows and sprays. Rev. W. D. Stenlake officiated. Pallbearers were Harley Ryckman, Harold White, John Downing, Ross Cook, Leslie Penhale and Aubrey Simpson. The flower bearers were T. Hatfield, C. Spragge, Joe Harp, Robert Harp and Warren Anger.  Relatives attended from Detroit, Windsor, St. Thomas and Aylmer. Interment took place in the Aylmer Cemetery.

Thomas Theron McArthur

3131302

Thomas McArthur was born on July 18, 1889 in Springfield, the son of Thomas M. McArthur (1848-1902) & Emily Jerore (1851-1935).  Thomas McArthur Sr. was the son of Richard & Emily McArthur and was a butcher living at Culloden when he was married there on November 20, 1873 to Emily Jerore, of Culloden, the daughter of Maxim Jerore.  They are buried in Springfield cemetery.

Thomas was a farmer living in Springfield when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1918 in London.

Thomas died on September 15,  1974 and is buried in Springfield cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 18, 1974:

T. McARTHUR

Thomas Theron McArthur of Springfield died at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Sunday, September 15th. He was 85 years of age. Born in Springfield on July 18, 1889, he was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Thomas McArthur. A life-long Springfield resident, he was a carpenter with the New York Central Railroad prior to his retirement.

He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. H. W. (Muriel) Crossett of Detroit, Michigan, and Mrs. Jack (Norah) Ope of Glendale, California.

Funeral was held at H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Wednesday, September 18th, conducted by the Rev. Cecil M. Jardine of St. John’s United Church, Springfield. Burial was in Springfield cemetery.

Charles Ross McCabe

K43065  Charles McCabe

Charles McCabe was born on May 8, 1899 in Glasgow, Scotland, the son of John McCabe & Catherine Dodds.  He served in both World War I and II, but it is not known when he emigrated to Canada.  An attestation paper for Charles in Canada cannot be identified, so it is possible he was still living in Scotland at the time.  The Book of Remembrance states that he enlisted in June 1917 and served with the Royal Navy in the North Sea, and was discharged in July 1919. 

He was living in the Springfield / Aylmer area when he served during World War II, and was married in England on October 25, 1943 to Muriel Robinson (Nov. 15, 1913 – April 11, 1980).  Their marriage, accompanied by a photograph, was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 30, 1943:

LEADING STOKER CHARLES (SCOTTY) McCABE, RCNVR, AND HIS BRIDE

L/Str. McCabe was married to Muriel Robinson, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs G. Robinson, of North Walsham, England, on October 25th 1943, at Parkstone, Dorset, England. They spent their honeymoon with relatives in Scotland. The groom is a native of Scotland. The groom was a resident of Aylmer and Springfield for a number of years before enlisting with the Royal Canadian Navy. He has been on convoy duty on a corvette for the past three years and is now posted on land in Scotland. The bride is a sister of Mrs. Stanley Dale, of Aylmer.

Charles died on August 13, 1980 and is buried with his wife in Springfield Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 20, 1980:

CHARLES McCABE

A funeral service was conducted last Friday, August 16, for Charles (Scotty) McCabe, of 30 Ashton St., Springfield, a retired stationary engineer at the Ontario Police College. He was 81. The Rev. George Shields officiated and the burial was in Springfield Cemetery. Mr. McCabe died at the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Wednesday, August 13.

He was born in Glasgow, Scotland on May 8, 1899 and was the son of the late John and Catherine (Dodds) McCabe.  Mr. McCabe was a veteran of WWI and WWII, a member of Col. Talbot Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion, a member of Springfield Masonic Lodge, a 32nd Degree Mason, a member of the London Lodge of Perfection-London Chapter of Rose Croix, and the Moore Consistory, Hamilton.

Survived by his children John of Springfield, Mrs. Austin (Marilyn) White, Aylmer; Mrs. Keith (Elizabeth) Johnson, Springfield; a brother to Mrs. Jessie Cannons and Miss Kate McCabe, both of Toronto, and by eight grandchildren.

Predeceased by his wife, the former Muriel Robinson in April and by many brothers and sisters. Pallbearers were Les Kilgour, Bert Killough, Art Jones, Bill Anger, Jerry Hunsperger and Stephen White. Members of the Springfield Masonic Lodge held a memorial service on Thursday evening. Kebbel Funeral Home made the arrangements.

Neal McCallum

190156  Neal McCallum

Neal McCallum was born on March 22, 1894 in Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, the son of Malcolm McCallum (1847-1922) & Mary Strom (1863-1951).  Malcolm was a native of Walsingham Township, the son of John McCallum & Ann McCallum, and was married in Walsingham on May 28, 1880 to Mary Strom, also of Walsingham, a native of Trossingen, Wurtemberg, Germany, daughter of Jacob Strom & Anna Bilger.  Malcolm & Mary moved to South Dorchester township about 1910, and lived in the area the remainder of their lives.  They are buried in Langton Cemetery.

Neal was a farmer living at Lyons when he enlisted for service on March 30, 1916 in St. Thomas. According to family stories, Neal contracted measles just days prior to leaving for overseas and was not able to go with his unit.  It is not known if he served in another capacity after his recovery, but he never joined the troops overseas.

He returned to Lyons where he lived and farmed at the southeast corner of the village at the intersection.

He was later married to Blanche Martin (1902-1981).  Neal died on July 3, 1984 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 4, 1984:

NEAL McCALLUM

Neal McCallum, 90, of Lyons, a retired farmer, died Tuesday, July 3, 1984 at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. He was born March 22, 1894 in North Walsingham Township, Norfolk County to the late Malcolm and Mary (Strom) McCallum but lived most of his life in Lyons.

Mr. McCallum was predeceased by his wife Blanche (Martin) McCallum. He is survived by several nieces and nephews. Mr. McCallum was the last surviving member of his family.

The funeral is arranged for Thursday, July 5, at 2 p.m. from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home with the Rev. John Bunner of Aylmer Baptist Church. Burial is to follow in Aylmer cemetery.

Edward Ellwood McCaulley

84170

Ellwood McCaulley was born on July 1, 1884 in Springfield, the son of George Albert McCaulley (1862-1928) & Sarah Lucinda Gates (1865-1939).  George McCaulley  was a butcher living in Springfield, the son of Edward McCaulley & Annie Straffon, when he was married on September 12, 1883 in Straffordville to Sarah Gates, a native of Malahide, the daughter of James & Mary Gates. They later moved to Windsor, but are buried in Mapleton cemetery.

Ellwood was a fireman (likely on the railroad) living in St. Thomas when he was married there on November 13, 1907 to Mary Maud Ada Bell, of Toronto, the daughter of John Bell & Mary Palmer.

Ellwood was a salesman living in Springfield when he enlisted for service on November 11, 1914 in London.  He had served three years in the 25th regiment.  He named his next of kin as his wife, Ada, of St. Thomas. He served with the 16th Battery in Canada, and in France with the 6th Battalion. He was discharged in February 1918.

Ellwood died on October 19, 1962 at the age of 78, and is buried in Mapleton cemetery.  His monument bears the following inscription:

Edward E. McCaulley  Bombardier  CFA CEF Oct 1962 age 78

Ellwood’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 24, 1962:

ELLWOOD McCAULLEY

Ellwood McCaulley, whose death occurred in his 79th year at his home at Middleport, midway between Brantford and Caledonia, on Friday, was a brother of Ross McCaulley, of Aylmer. The funeral was held on Monday morning from the Miller Funeral Chapel, Caledonia, and interment followed in Mapleton cemetery.  Mr. McCaulley is also survived by one sister, Mrs. Mildred Moffat, Windsor, and three other brothers, John McCaulley, in Wisconsin; Clare McCaulley, of Hamilton, and George McCaulley, of New York City.

George Albert McCaulley

3060870

George McCaulley was born on June 26, 1894 at Mapleton in Yarmouth township, the son of George Albert McCaulley (1862-1928) & Sarah Lucinda Gates (1865-1939).  George McCaulley Sr. was a butcher living in Springfield, the son of Edward McCaulley & Annie Straffon, when he was married on September 12, 1883 in Straffordville to Sarah Gates, a native of Malahide, the daughter of James & Mary Gates. They later moved to Windsor, but are buried in Mapleton cemetery.

George McCaulley Jr. was a bookkeeper living at Ridgeway in Welland County when he was married there on June 21, 1916 to Esther Hazel Pound, of Ridgeway, the daughter of M. N. Pound & Bertha Zavitz.

They made their home in Ridgeway where George was living when he enlisted for service on August 31, 1918 at Barriefield, Ontario. He enlisted with the 1st Depot Battalion, E.O. Regiment.

When his brother Ellwood died in 1962, George was living in New York City. He died in October 1967 in Hackensack, Bergen County, New Jersey.

Roland Herbert McClennan

3136848

Roland McClennan was born on December 21, 1894 at Grovesend in Malahide, the son of Kenneth McClennan (1857-1933) & Margaret Dodds (1853-1943).  Kenneth was born in Malahide, the son of Donald McClennan & Margaret McLean.  Margaret Dodds was born near Stratford, the daughter of Edward Dodds & Harriet Brown, but came to Malahide as a young girl.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Roland was a farmer living with his parents at R.R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on May 27, 1918 in London.

He was a coal merchant living in Aylmer when he was married there on June 27, 1922 to Teresa Bell Thomas (1899-1980), also of Aylmer but born in Malahide, the daughter of George Thomas & Emma Haney.  

Roland died on December 1, 1990 at the age of 95,  and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his wife and son, Thomas H., (1927-1989).

Roland’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 5, 1990:

Roland Herbert McClennan

Roland Herbert McClennan, 95, of Lake Erie Lodge, Port Burwell, a retired farmer, died at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Saturday, December 1, 1990.  He was born in Malahide Township on December 21, 1894, son of the late Kenneth and Martha (Dodds) McClennan. He had lived all his life in Aylmer and Malahide Townships, and was an adherent of St. Paul’s Untied Church.  Mr. McClennan is survived by son John McClennan and his wife Pat of Lambeth; daughter Ann Walker and her husband John of RR 1 Aylmer; daughter-in-law Mabel McClennan of London; 12 grandchildren; and 22 great grandchildren.  He was predeceased by his wife Teresa Bell (Thomas) McClennan in 1980 and son Thomas McClennan.  Pastor Norman Hare of Malahide United Church conducted the funeral service from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Monday, December 3.  Mr. McClennan was cremated, with ashes to be buried in Aylmer cemetery.

John McCloy

The name John McCloy appears on a Springfield Honor Roll, but no one by that name can be found on the 1901 or 1911 census in the Springfield area.

There are three attestation papers with the name John McCloy, but one is from Edmonton, the other Brockville.  The third is John Lindsay McCloy, #510562, born September 13, 1881 in Crossgar, County Down, Ireland.  He is a teamster living at 35 Taylor Street, Toronto, and is not married.  He names his next of kin as his mother Jane McCloy of Ballyalgin, Crossgar, County Down.  He enlisted on December 1, 1915 in Toronto.

It is possible this man worked in the Springfield area prior to moving to Toronto.

Hugh Lowell McConnell

Hugh McConnell was born on September 26, 1892 in Port Burwell, the son of George Boardman McConnell (1851-1933) & Mary Catherine Glover (1855-1923).  George was born at Lakeview in Malahide Township, the son of James McConnell & Jerusha Park, and was living in Malahide when he was married on December 15, 1875 in Aylmer to Mary Glover, a native of Bayham Township living in Aylmer, the daughter of William Augustus Glover & Louisa Summers.  George McConnell was a farmer, then became a merchant in Port Burwell.  The Bayham township 1901 census describes him as a druggist.  The family moved to California about 1910, and are found on the 1920 census in San Bernadino.  Both George & Mary died in Upland, California.

Hugh enlisted with the United States army, signing a U.S. Draft Registration card on June 5, 1917.  He was living in Los Angeles, and was a salesman.

Following the war, Hugh continued to live in Los Angeles where he is found on the 1930 census boarding with Marion Hale and her aunt.  He was an insurance salesman.  He later married Marion Hale and they had two children: Hugh Glover McConnell (1934-1987) & Susan McConnell (born 1939).

Hugh died on June 18, 1952 in Los Angeles, California.  His name appears on the cenotaph in Port Burwell.

 

William Burton McCord

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William McCord was born on October 8, 1896 in Houghton Township, Norfolk County, the son of Thomas Hugh McCord & Frances Jane Burton. Thomas was born in Houghton, the son of John & Jane McCord and was living there when he was married on September 26, 1895 in Port Rowan to Frances Burton, also of Houghton, the daughter of Frederick & Martha Burton. They are buried in Hemlock Cemetery, Houghton Township.

William was farming at Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on June 17, 1918 in London.

He was living in Port Burwell when he was married there on December 17, 1919 to Alta Gertrude Woodworth (1898-1972), of Port Burwell, daughter of George Woodworth & L. Pressey. William died in 1992 and is buried with his wife in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Earl Harris McCurdy

3138848  Earl McCurdy

Earl McCurdy was born on December 8, 1896 in Vienna, the son of Holland Harris McCurdy (1875-1949) & Ella Alena Elgie (1876-1930).  Holland was born in Bayham, the son of Samuel Densmore McCurdy & Elsie Ann Stilwell, and was farming there when he was married on January 28, 1896 to Ella Elgie, a native of New Sarum living in Bayham, the daughter of Henry Elgie & Sarah J. Cummings.  Ella is buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Earl was a farmer living at Vienna when he enlisted for service on June 17, 1918 in London.

He was farming in Bayham when he was married on November 2, 1921 in Ingersoll to Florence Edna Marlatt (1899-1995), a native of Bayham living in St. Thomas, the daughter to John Marlatt & Nellie Tribe. 

Earl died on December 20,  1974 and is buried with his wife in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.  His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, December 23, 1974:

EARL H. McCURDY

Earl H. McCurdy of Vienna passed away on Friday, December 20, 1974 at Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital, in his 79th year.  Born in Bayham Township, December 8, 1896, he was a son of the late Holland McCurdy and the former Ella Elgie.  Surviving are his wife, the former Florence Marlatt; one daughter, Mrs. Norman (Marjorie) Todd of Tillsonburg; four sons, Robert McCurdy of Little Current; Austin McCurdy and Ralph McCurdy, both of Vienna; and Harold McCurdy of Tillsonburg; one sister, Mrs. Vivian Howey of Tillsonburg; three brothers, Kenneth McCurdy of Tillsonburg; Burton McCurdy of Putnam, and Jack McCurdy of Lions Head; 14 grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

Rested at the H. A. Ostrander and Son Funeral Home where service was held Monday, December 23, at 2 p.m. conducted by Mr. Thomas Watson of Vienna United Church.

Pallbearers were grandsons, Bob Todd, Douglas Todd, Ronald McCurdy, Randy McCurdy, Dennis McCurdy and Gary McCurdy.  Interment in St. Luke’s Cemetery, Vienna.

Charles A. McDermand

Charles A. McDermand was born about 1867 in Malahide, the son of James McDermand (ca 1833-1899) and his wife Martha C., (ca 1837-1906). James & Martha are buried in Aylmer cemetery with another son, Sydney Smith McDermand (1868-1961).

A letter was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 8, 1917 from Lieut. McDermand:

FORMER AYLMER BOY DOING HIS BIT WITH U.S. ARMY

Lieut. C. A. McDermand Now With a Dental Corps

In a recent letter to the Express, Lieut. McDermand says in part:

“You will no doubt be surprised to learn that I am now in the service of the U.S. Army trying to do my bit in the interest of my native and adopted country, and for humanity. I have accepted a commission as First Lieutenant in the Dental Reserve Corps, and am stationed at 345 Regimental Infirmary, Camp Pike, Little Rock, Arkansas, with the 87th Division of the National Army. While it has been many years since I left Aylmer, I still read with interest the Express, and its local columns recall many pleasant memories of my school days at the Aylmer High. 

Charles emigrated to the United States and became a dentist, and is found on the 1910, 1920 and 1930 census in Bloomington, Illinois with his wife Martha and son James Sidney.  The 1920 census states he is a Captain in the U.S. army.

He died in 1940 in Bloomington, Illinois. An obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 27, 1940:

Mr. S. S. McDermand, of Pt. Burwell R.R. 1, received a telegram on Tuesday announcing the death of his brother, Dr. C. A. McDermand, a dentist at Bloomington, Illinois. Mr. McDermand left on Wednesday morning to attend the funeral there on Thursday. Dr. McDermand had been in failing health for the past year.

Stuart Stanley Roy McDiarmid

Stuart McDiarmid was born on August 5, 1881 in Yarmouth, the son of Hugh H. McDiarmid (ca 1846-1933) & Bessie McEwen.  Hugh was born in St. Thomas, the son of John & Christina McDiarmid, and was a merchant living in Sparta when he was married on September 21, 1880 in Tiverton to Bessie McEwen, of Tiverton, the daughter of Hugh & Christina McEwen. Hugh later farmed and was also a fruit grower.

Stuart’s birth registration gives his date of birth as August 5 in Yarmouth, while his Attestation paper states he was born August 4 in Aylmer. He moved to Vancouver and was an engineer when he was married on January 23, 1909 in Toronto to Helen S. Kirby, daughter of Joseph Kirby & Sarah Coates. 

He was living at 3181 2nd Ave., Vancouver, a land surveyor, when he made an officer’s declaration on May 13, 1917 in Vancouver.  He was a Lieutenant in the Forestry Depot, C.E.F., in a Vancouver unit.  He had served in the Cadet Corps in Aylmer and belonged to the 72nd Regiment.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Helen, of Lake Louise, Alberta.

A letter from Stuart was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 21, 1918:

NO WONDER THE FRENCH HATE THE GERMANS

Huns in Their Retreat Destroy All Towns and Villages
Even Children’s Playthings Trampled in the Ruins

Lieut. Stuart McDiarmid, who is with the Canadian Engineers in France has written the following interesting letter regarding conditions in France in October, to his wife here.

France, October 21st, 1918

My Dear Wife –
I am living in the basement of a brewery but before the Germans moved out of this town they made sure that total prohibition should be in effect for their successors. If it had been total prohibition of everything it would have helped a lot this morning, for it rained all night and there isn’t a roof in the town. The result is that for shelter everyone must get down in the cellars and trust that the debris above will hold out some of the rain.

We are in the area which the Germans have held since 1914 and the conditions are very different. It is open warfare, the fighting being for towns, lines of communications and bridges. There are no more trenches or barbed wire and that is a wonderful thing in itself. The Hun in retreat has not only done those things which are expected in war, the mining of roads, the demolition of bridges and the destruction of railroads, but he has also wantonly destroyed everything which the civilians had and valued. This town like many others in this district is very similar to what the town of Aylmer would be if in the path of the Hun. Imagine being herded out of your home, compelled to leave everything from the piano to the baby’s latest toy, then have every mattress slashed, every bit of covering on upholstered furniture cut and torn, the clothing thrown on the floor, with the books from the library and trampled with the dishes, pots and pans, and then to complete the work, turn the artillery on the town when it is a few miles away. It seems particularly tragic to see the children’s playthings, their pictures and dolls all torn and trampled in the ruins. Older people can look after themselves, but they must have had the added burden of heartbroken children. No wonder if the next generation of the French grow up to hate the Germans.

The surrounding country is very wet with many lakes, rivers and canals. The enemy has of course destroyed all the fine steel bridges, and I cannot estimate the number. In this country the roads are so numerous that there must be many bridges and all one has to do is to look up and down a river or canal and count a flock of them. Our work has been bridges of late. I have just returned from seeing the first lorries pass over a steel bridge completed this morning. Our company has worked for 30hours continually erecting a steel bridge 108 feet long in one span over a canal. The time should have been cut down to 24 hours but it was our first experience with a bridge of this type and I feel sure that we could erect the same bridge with our own company in much less than 24 hours for we now know how everything should be done.

The war has done wonderful things in the way of inventions and I count this a liberal education. Imagine any person undertaking to erect an all-0steel bridge of 110 feet span, without any machinery, in 24 hours in peace times. All we had were blocks and tackle and 150 men to furnish the power. This bridge will carry any traffic except tanks and this is very important when you consider the load of the big tractors towing the huge “heavies” crossing such a bridge. A very brilliant brain designed the structure – a standard type made up from standard sections, and it is possible to build such a bridge with no cribbing or false work in support. Some of the things which are being done over here would not be credited by engineers back home. There mus be some permanent benefit for the future from the innovations and initiative used in France.

My C.O. has been for a walk and has just brought me a beautiful white rose. The gardens have quite a few vegetables and some flowers. I notice that the men cooks salvaged a couple of pumpkins and if they can make pies, it will require some ingenuity on their part. For the past two days we have had lots of mushrooms and these things go a long way in making the meals more interesting. We expect to move forward early in the morning, and we hope to find less destruction up there. The Principle laid down in the French House of Deputies of “town for town” is, we believe, having an effect for the Hun cannot conceive of his own cities being ruined as he has ruined those of France. If such a fate befalls them, I can imagine some of those Germans Jew second hand dealers going crazy in their delirium when they see the prospects for salvaging. The Hun started this frightfulness and insisted upon it but he has yet to start anything which we can’t do just a little better than he can, especially if the Canadians have the doing of it. Our men have the tricolor flying in all the villages they enter. I believe they both admire and love the French.

We are travelling so quickly and so far from the old bases that it is not easy to keep in touch with the international situation. The army is not “standing by” waiting for the diplomats to wind up the war. The army is so anxious to get back home and be done with the war that it is doing its best to hasten the end. The rank and file are hoping for a Christmas with peace. The officers, especially those higher up, hope so but they probably better realize the enormity of the task.  Have just received orders to move about 12 miles forward – some jump but we have to jump quickly for to keep in touch with Fritz going home.

Stuart returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on June 19. He was living in Trail, British Columbia when his father died in 1933. Stuart died on January 18, 1956 in North Vancouver, British Columbia at the age of 74.

George Ernest McDonald

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George Ernest McDonald was born on October 8, 1897 at Copenhagen in Malahide, the son of Albert Eugene McDonald (1868-1938) & Annie Rebecca Cornwall Sims (1868-1943).  Albert was the son of George McDonald & Dorothy House, and was married on July 26, 1889 to Annie Sims, the daughter of Andrew & Mary. They lived at lot 9, concession 1, Malahide, and are buried in Dunboyne cemetery.

George was living at R.R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on May 27, 1918.  He was a farmer and not married.

George was living in Port Burwell when he was married on May 4, 1927 to Edith Crooker, the daughter of James Crooker of Port Bruce.  Following their marriage, they lived at Copenhagen on lot 8, concession 1,  where a daughter Cella Fay (Oct. 12, 1928-Oct.13, 1928) was born.  Another daughter, Pearl Marie was born on Aug. 18, 1929 and died on Oct. 18, 1929.

There is a George E. McDonald (1897-1956) buried in Tillsonburg Cemetery.

John Quartus MacDonald

190217  John McDonald

John MacDonald was born on May 19, 1898 in Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, the son of James Malcolm MacDonald (1867-1952) & Harriet A. Brearley.  James was born in Waterdown, the son of John & Elizabeth, but was living at Glenshee when he was married on November 29, 1897 in Delhi to Harriet Brearly, a native of Ingersoll also living at Glenshee, the daughter of Alfred & Mary Ann Brearly.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

John was a farmer living in the Aylmer area when he enlisted for service on April 3, 1916 with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas.  He lists his next of kin as his mother, Harriet, also of Aylmer.  He had served in the 30th Battery, C.F.A.

He sailed for England on June 29, 1916, and was transferred to the 35th Battalion on July 15, 1916 and to the 87th Battalion on August 20, 1916, on which date he proceeded to France.  He was invalided to England October 25, 1916, and transferred to the 22nd Reserve Battalion March 22, 1917 and to the 23rd Reserve Battalion May 9, 1917.  He returned to the 87th Battalion in the Field July 10, 1917.  He received a gun shot wound to the left hand on September 30, 1918. He returned to Canada and was honorably discharged on June 9, 1919.  He was awarded the Military Medal on March 13, 1919.

A photo of John with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Pte. John McDonald is a son of Mr. Malcolm McDonald of this place, and went overseas with the 91st Batt. He has been confined to the hospital of late on account of illness. He is 18 years of age”.

A letter from John to his father was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 7, 1916:

THE IRISH NAVY

The Gray-back Infantry and an Appetite for Honey

John Macdonald, in a letter to his father, from “Somewhere in France”, writes:

I saw one of those little “tanks” you asked me about. They are not just plain “tanks” any more. We have re-christened them the “Irish navy”. If you can imagine a giant snapping-turtle, with a steel shell, it will give you some idea. It slides along on its belly, just like a turtle. That’s the impression you get. You don’t notice what pushes it along till after you begin to think something of that kind is necessary, just like you don’t notice a turtle’s feet at first. The traveling gear looks like the apron of a manure spreader, only it’s bigger. It’s like a big locomotive, running on two tracks along with it. I wasn’t allowed to get very close to it, but I was close enough to see the outworks of it. The shell is pretty thick, about [censored].

It would be a great rig to move buildings with. If Dick Davidson had one he could move Aylmer over, across the Catfish, in short order. It takes down the fences and all.  If there is a house in the way it pushes it over, and uses it for a road-bed. I thought of that piece the Salvation Army used to sing, “Roll the Old Chariot Along”. If the devil happened to be in the road it would roll over him, all right, and he’d look worse than if Bill Tait had “fell” on him. It’s a nice little sabberwock so long as it is going the other way, but I wouldn’t want to have it “come whiffling through the tulgey woods” towards me. The Bosches have good reason to be “scairt” of it.

The worst enemy we have here is the Grayback infantry. I can write only about three words at a time, then I have to stop and roll over a battalion or two of them so they can get a fresh start. I don’t mind them doing a route-march, or platoon drill, but I don’t seem to be able to stand them going through the bayonet exercise in among my hair. When they make the “long point” they forget to withdraw, and then I have to stop telling you about the “tank” and scrape them up with my fingernails. They give us powder of some kind to put on our clothes. It don’t seem to be intended to kill them. It’s a sort of tonic. They “take it” all right, and don’t make a face over it, so it’s likely good medicine. It gives them an appetite. One of the fellows said it acted on his family of Grayback Infantry something like soothing syrup. It put them to sleep for awhile, and they were bright and active when they woke up. I think my regiment of them has arranged to take their medicine so there will be a night shift and a day shift, for there is always something doing in my mop, and they are much hungrier after they have taken the dope. A fellow never gets lonesome with them. They keep us from worrying about anything else, at least.

I got a letter from B. He says he had almost two tons of honey. My mouth has been watering ever since I read the letter. I don’t know how much I could eat, but I feel as though I might do away with a ton, just for a start.

I must ring off, for this time. They are starting to give away the “eats” and I don’t want to miss the show. I have a great appetite. I gained 16 pounds while I was in “Blighty”, and I don’t think I have lost anything since I got to France.

So long Dad John

P.S. The shell fire is something like getting snow-balled. You keep dodging and dodging.

An article about John appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 29, 1992:

BATTALION HOLDS MEMORIAL

First World War Veteran Lays Wreath at Boy Soldier Statue

Seventy-six years ago, John MacDonald spent his days delivering messages from one military headquarters to another, all the while dodging enemy fire and the sight of death.  

Outside St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Sunday morning, the former soldier delivered an item of a different kind – a wreath – to the foot of the bronze Boy Soldier cenotaph, where it lay in memory of those who had not been so fortunate.

Mr. MacDonald is one of two remaining survivors of the 91st Battalion, a unit that once numbered 940 men. The other, bugler William Brickenden, was also on hand for the ceremony.

Master of ceremonies Don Stokes said it was only a few months ago that he and other local Legion members found out Mr. MacDonald was still alive. This also occurred two years ago, when Mr. Brickenden contacted the Legion after seeing a story touting the late Bob Gray as the sole surviving member.  Mr. Stokes said it was a most pleasant surprise.  “It’s a good feeling to know there’s someone out there”, he said.

Mr. MacDonald said taking part in the ceremony was new to him.  “I never dreamed of it”, he said.  “It brought back a lot of memories”.

Mr. MacDonald, who now lives in Sparta, served with the unit from 1916 to 1919. He served in the dangerous and important position of “runner”, hand-delivering various communications from base to base.

Mr. Brickenden served as a bugler in England for 3 ½ years. He first joined the unit at age 15 with intentions to “save the world”.  Mr. Stokes said all Canadians should appreciate the efforts of the battalion members, many who sacrificed their lives for their country.  “These men are a reminder to us Canadians as we are about to celebrate our 125th anniversary, that it was only 76 years ago that as soldiers in a foreign land they made the world aware that Canada was indeed a nation”, he said.  “The democracy and freedom that these men fought and died for is still here and is worth preserving”.

Several local dignitaries attended the ceremony including MP Ken Monteith, Tourism and Recreation Minister Peter North and Mayor Steve Peters.

Following the war, John  farmed at the bottom of the Jamestown Hill where he lived for many years before retiring to Sparta and later Elgin Manor.  He died there on December 27, 1993 at the age of 95. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express:

JOHN QUARTUS MacDONALD

A funeral for John Quartus MacDonald, 95, a recipient of the Military Medal for Bravery and one of the last known survivors of the 91st Battalion, was held Thursday, December 30, from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home in Aylmer.

Bill Brickenden of St. Thomas remains the only known survivor of the 91st.  Mr. MacDonald was a retired Sparta area farmer who died at Elgin Manor on Monday, December 27, 1993.  He served as a private with 940 volunteers of the battalion who went overseas in 1916. In Europe, the 91st was disbanded to reinforce other units at the front.

Mr. MacDonald was born in Simcoe on May 19, 1898 to the late Malcolm and Harriet MacDonald.  He operated a farm in the Sparta area most of his life.  He was a member of Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 41, St. Thomas.  Mr. MacDonald is survived by a sister Iona Mulvihill of New Jersey, and by several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews and cousins.  He was predeceased by two sisters, Reta MacDonald and Mary Cottrell.

The Reverend Ron Walker of Trinity Anglican Church in Aylmer, conducted the service. Burial was in Aylmer cemetery. Pallbearers were Harold, Paul and George Martyn, Tom and David Roberts and Eugene Crosby.

Osgoode Hamilton McDonald

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The name Osgoode McDonald is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Osgoode Hamilton McDonald was born on March 26, 1897 in Dundas, Wentworth County, the son of Rev. Archibald P. McDonald & P. A. Hamilton.  Rev. McDonald was a minister of the Aylmer Baptist church around 1905.

Osgoode was a student at McMaster University in Toronto when he enlisted for service on December 28, 1917 in Kingston.  He names his next of kin as his father, of 104 Peter Street, Port Arthur, Ontario.  He had served 15 months in the C.O.T.C.

No further information is known.

Agnes McDougall

Nursing Sister  Agnes McDougall

Agnes McDougall was born in 1864 or 1870  in Westminster Township, Middlesex County, the daughter of Thomas McDougall and Isabella Turnbull.  Thomas was born in East Lothian, Scotland, about 1833, the son of John McDougall & Jane Anderson, and was living in Westminster Township when he was married there on March 11, 1864 to Isabella Turnbull, also a resident of Westminster, born about 1841, the daughter of Thomas Turnbull & Agnes Rae.

Agnes’ attestation paper is not available for viewing, but her obituary states she enlisted in 1916. She served overseas with the Canadian Army Medical Corps, and returned to Canada in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 7.

She died on July 18, 1919 in Victoria Hospital, London, at the age of 49, according to her death registration. She is buried in Aylmer Cemetery with her aunt and uncle, Arthur & Elizabeth (Drysdale) Brown.  The inscription on that monument gives her year of birth as 1864. In addition to her name on her uncle’s monument, her resting place is marked by a military marker with the following inscription:

Nursing Sister Agnes McDougall, C.A.M.C., C.E.F.  18th July 1919. She died to make men free.

Agnes’ obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 24, 1919:

The remains of Nursing Sister Miss Agnes McDougall, of Westminster, who died at Victoria Hospital, London, last Friday morning, after suffering for six months from cancer of the stomach, passed through Aylmer Sunday afternoon to the Aylmer cemetery. Miss McDougall enlisted in 1916 with the 10th Canadian Stationary Division under Col. Seburn, and was invalided home about the first of the year. It is thought her trouble was caused from excessive work overseas. Deceased was a niece of Mrs. Arthur Brown and Mrs. Welter, of Malahide. She leaves two brothers to mourn her loss, in Toronto and Saskatoon, also one sister, Mrs. Bennett, of Toronto. Rev. J. A. H. McLean was in charge of the service and the bearers were returned soldiers in khaki: Ed Hatcher, Wm. Dunning, Percy Crawford, George Orton, James Orton and William Butcher.

Henry George McFaul

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Henry McFaul was born on April 25, 1883 in Aylmer.  His birth is not registered, and it cannot be determined what his parents names are.  He could be the son of an Edward McFaul who was married on March 3, 1880 in Yarmouth to Maggie McTavish, daughter of John McTavish & Isabella McIntyre.

Henry was employed as a miner when he enlisted for service on July 5, 1915 in Prince Albert, British Columbia.  He was not married, and names his next of kin as his brother, J. P. McFaul of Buckingham, Quebec.  He had served in the 49th Infantry in Belleville, Ontario, and belonged to the 52nd Regiment P.A.V.

No further information is known.

Rev. John Milton McGillivray

The name “Rev. J. M. McGillivray” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Aylmer. 

John Milton McGillivray was born on October 19, 1883 in Picton, Ontario.  He was minister of Knox Presbyterian Church in Aylmer from 1910 to 1914.  He is found on the 1911 census in Aylmer, boarding with Jane & Margaret Mann.

Rev. McGillivray signed an Officer’s Declaration at Camp Borden on October 11, 1916. He was a Captain in the 149th Battalion. He belonged to the 12th Brigade, C.F.A., and names his mother, Adeline, of Picton,  as his next of kin. 

An article about Rev. McGillivray appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 18, 1917:

Rev. J. M. MacGillivray, formerly pastor of Knox Church here, who has held the rank of Captain, being chaplain of the 149th (Lambton) Battalion, has been prevented from going overseas in the capacity of chaplain, owing to recent military orders stating no more chaplains were needed. But you cannot fool a Scotchman. He was determined to do his bit, so has enlisted as a combatant and has qualified for a Lieutenancy, in the same battalion. We always thought Mac was made of the right stuff and now we know it.

Andrew Evan McGregor

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Andrew McGregor was born on April 27, 1899 in Yarmouth Township, the son of John J. McGregor (1844-1904) & Margaret Ferguson (1859-1940).  He was a student living with his mother at 51 Roseberry Place, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on May 28, 1918 in Guelph.

Following the war, he returned to the St. Thomas area where he was a farmer.  He later retired in Aylmer. He died on November 30, 1985 and is buried in St. Thomas Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 4, 1985:

Andrew Evan McGregor

Andrew Evan McGregor, 86, of 10 Treelawn Avenue, Aylmer, a retired farmer, died at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Saturday, November 30. He was born April 27, 1899, in North Yarmouth Township, to the late John and Margaret (Ferguson) McGregor.  Mr. McGregor lived in the St. Thomas area all his life.  He was in the armed forces during the First Great War.  He is survived by wife Mrs. Matilda Margaret (Bone) McGregor, stepson Charles Edward Bugg, of Hinton, Alberta; stepgranddaughter Sharon, and a number of nephews and nieces.  Two brothers and six sisters predeceased Mr. McGregor. The funeral service was to be conducted in St. Thomas Wednesday, December 4, by The Reverend Dr. H. S. Rodney of Knox Presbyterian Church, St. Thomas.  Mr. McGregor will be buried in St. Thomas Cemetery.

Norman McGregor

Norman McGregor’s name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna.  This man cannot be positively identified. The only Norman McGregor enlisting from Ontario was Lieut. Norman William McGregor, whose Officer’s Declaration paper is dated December 14, 1915 in London.  He was born May 31, 1886 at Muncey, Middlesex County, and was living at 474 Pall Mal Street, London.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Jane Kate Gardiner, of the same address. He was a merchant and belonged to the 26th Middlesex Light Infantry.

Norman’s birth registration shows that he was born on the above date in Caradoc Township, Middlesex County, the son of Alexander McGregor, a merchant, and his wife Jane R. Forsyth. The family is found in the 1891 census in Caradoc Township.  Following Alexander’s death, his widow Jane Roy McGregor, daughter of John & Jane Forsyth, was still living in Caradoc when she was remarried to Charles Oliver Gardner, of Southwold Township, son of Joseph Gardner & Isabella Oliver.  They were married in Delaware on April 14, 1899.

If this is the Norman McGregor on the cenotaph, his connection to the Vienna area is unknown.

John Lanson McGuire

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John McGuire was born on March 6, 1896 in Dresden, Kent County, the son of William McGuire & Annie Kane.  William was born in Dawn Township, Lambton County, the son of James & Margaret McGuire, and was farming there when he was married on November 10, 1891 in Dresden to Annie Kane, of Dresden, daughter of James & Catherine Kane.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Bothwell, and in London in 1911.  William was a mill foreman.

John McGuire was a lumberman living at R.R. #1 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 25, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his father, also of R.R. #1 Aylmer. 

No further information can be found.

Wilfrid McIntosh

The name “Capt. Wilfrid McIntosh, M.D.” is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Wilfred Alonzo McIntosh was born on July 5, 1870 in Windham Township, Norfolk County,  the son of Daniel & Cornelia McIntosh.  He attended high school in Aylmer, and was living in Simcoe when he was married on June 9, 1897 in Brantford Township to Georgianna File, of Brantford Township, the daughter of George & Caroline File.

 He was a physician and surgeon and signed an Officer’s Declaration paper as a Major with the 133rd Battalion on November 19, 1915 in Simcoe. He belonged to the 39th Regiment and had been a medical doctor in that regiment since 1907.  His next of kin was his wife, Georgianna.

Dr. McIntosh died on August 29, 1932, and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Simcoe. His obituary appeared in the Simcoe Reformer, September 1, 1932:

DEATH OF DR. W. A. McINTOSH KEENLY FELT BY COMMUNITY

Was Prominent in Many Branches of Public Life – A Native of Norfolk. He Spent His Life in Service of its People – Former Mayor of Simcoe, Past Master of Norfolk Lodge, Past President of Rotary Club, President of Historical Society, M.O.H., and Incumbent of Many Other Offices

Simcoe lost one of its most zealous public servants and Norfolk County’s distinguished citizen in the death last Monday morning of Dr. W. A. McIntosh at the Toronto General Hospital after an illness of [illegible] week duration.  Contracting a [illegible] throat infection while in the practice of his medical duties, he became seriously ill one week ago Saturday and was hurried to Toronto where two operations were performed last week. But the infection persisted and gradually wore down his resistance in spite of all possible medical skill.

His death came as a personal loss to a wide circle of friends in town and district where he had spent so many years. Born in the Township of Windham in 1870, he was a son of the late D. E. McIntosh, who was a teacher in Windham and later became agent-inspector of the Norfolk Children’s Aid Society.  Dr. McIntosh obtained his early education in the public schools of Windham, Aylmer High School, and Simcoe Model School.  He also attended Hamilton Collegiate and the Normal School in Ottawa. Graduating from Trinity Medical College, Toronto, in [illegible], he came to Simcoe where he had practiced continuously since that time with the exception of his years of overseas service.  It is also worthy of note that he taught school in Norfolk and Haldimand Counties and was on the Central School staff, Simcoe, for three years.

He had a very active career in municipal affairs. He served on the Simcoe town council for two years prior to the war and was a member of the Board of Education [seven?] years, and of the Simcoe Library Board. As a Major in the C.A.M.C., he had a meritorious record overseas, giving five years of continuous service in Canada, England and France. At a later time he received the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel with the reserve forces.

In 1920 Dr. McIntosh re-entered the town council and in 1921 and 1922 he occupied the office of Mayor of Simcoe, transacting the duties with admirable efficiency.  Among other public and fraternal duties held by him were: Medical Officer of Health for Simcoe; Coroner for Norfolk County; Gaol Surgeon for the Norfolk gaol; Physician for the Industrial Home of Norfolk; C.N.R. medical officer for Simcoe and district; medical representative of the Department of [illegible] and National Health. He occupied these posts of responsibility to the time of his death as well as the presidency of the Norfolk Historical Society by which organization he will be greatly missed. He was a past president of the Simcoe Rotary Club at whose meetings he was a regular attendant and a source of inspiration.

Dr. McIntosh always took a keen interest in the Masonic fraternity having served as Master of Norfolk Lodge No. 10 in 1903. He joined Ezra Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and served as Superintendent of Wilson District R.A.M. He was in line for the next District Deputy Grand Master of Wilson District, A.F. & A.M. Even in latter years, when most of his old friends in the fraternity had retired, Dr. McIntosh never lost interest. His mature judgement and his thorough knowledge of Masonic principles and history were welcomed in the lodge, while his brilliant oratory enlivened many a Masonic banquet. He had not missed a St. John’s Night banquet for many years. Thus it was appropriate that he should be laid to rest with Masonic honours.

Dr. McIntosh was in frequent demand as a speaker at social and public functions. One of his most recent addresses was given before a distinguished body of medical men at the Canadian Medical Association last month. At that time he was honoured by appointment as District Counsellor for the Ontario Medical Association. He was one of the charter members and a past president of the Harvey Club of London, which embraced many prominent men of the medical profession.

For many years he was connected with the former Norfolk Rifles as Medical Officer and he took an active interest in military affairs, having written to some extent on the early military history of Norfolk. In politics he was a prominent Liberal and though he did not stand for election, he was frequently seen on the platform at political gatherings.

By his colleagues in Simcoe he was held in deep regard both for the depth of his medical knowledge and his kindly presence. One of them paid this simple though eloquent tribute: “He was a real gentleman”. A verdict that will find its echo in every heart.

Besides his widow, there remain three sons, Dr. Donald McIntosh, who has been on the staff of the state hospital in Rochester, N.Y.; Duncan McIntosh, B.Sc., at home; and Keith, who will shortly graduate in medicine from the University of Toronto.

Charles Charlton McIntyre

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Charles McIntyre was born on January 11, 1896 in South Dorchester, the son of Angus McIntyre & Sarah Jane Whaley.  Angus was the son of Archibald & Mary McIntyre and was living in South Dorchester when he was married on May 5, 1880 in North Dorchester to Sarah Whaley, of North Dorchester, the daughter of Lyman Whaley & Sarah Jane Burgess.  They are buried in Dorchester Union cemetery.

Charles was a farmer living at RR #1 Springfield when he enlisted for service on May 28, 1918 in London.

He was farming in North Dorchester when he was married on November 22, 1922 in Dorchester to Mary Jane Hutcheson (born 1898), also of North Dorchester, the daughter of John Hutcheson & Susan Sangster.

Charles died on September 28, 1956 and is buried in Putnam Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Ingersoll Tribune, October 4, 1956:

CHARLES McINTYRE PASSES AT AVON

Avon – A well known and esteemed resident of Avon, in the person of Charles McIntyre, passed away late Friday afternoon at his home at Avon.

Born in Avon, the son of Mr and Mrs Angus McIntyre, Mr. McIntyre was in his 61st year and had lived on the family farm all his life. Though in failing health the past year, his passing came as a shock to his relatives and friends.

Left to mourn the passing of a beloved husband and father are his wife, the former Mary J. Hutcheson of Putnam, and one son, Homer, at home.

Three brothers, Mervin and Frank, Avon; Claire of Walqers, and one sister, Mrs. Iva Johnson, London. One sister (Bertha) and one brother (Clifton) predeceased him several years ago.

The funeral was held from the Logan Funeral Home, Dorchester, to the Putnam Cemetery on Monday afternoon at 2:30. Rev. L. J. Coates of Avon United Church, conducted the services.  Miss Evelyn Clifford sang “At The End of The Road” during the service with Mrs. Wilfred Pigram as accompanist.  The pallbearers who also acted as flower bearers were: George Clifford, C. D. Daniel, George Stirton, Bruce Fletcher, Grant Goble and Fred Pilkington.

 

Agnes Pendreigh McKeague

Nursing Sister 

The name Agnes P. McKeague is found in the Book of Remembrance for Elgin County. That record states she was the daughter of William & Isabell Pendreigh.  She enlisted in December 1917, and served in England.

Agnes Pendreigh was born in 1872 in Linton, Haddington, Midlothian, Scotland, the daughter of William Pendreigh (1845-1916) and Isabella Williamson (1845-1920).  William was born at East Linton, Scotland, the son of George Pendreigh & Harriet Dickson.  Isabella Williamson was born at Prestonpas, Scotland.  William & Isabella are found on the 1871 census in the parish of Great Linton, Haddington, Scotland. They emigrated to Canada about 1875, settling at lot 8, concession 8, South Dorchester. They are found in South Dorchester census records from 1881 through 1911.  William & Isabella are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Agnes was married on June 27, 1905 to Joseph B. McKeague.  Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, June 29, 1905:

On Tuesday, June 27, a most artistic wedding took place at Hillcrest Farm, South Dorchester, the home of Mr and Mrs Wm. Pendreigh, when their eldest daughter, Agnes, was married to Mr. Joseph B. McKeague, of Chicago, Rev. J. W. Rue, brother-in-law of the groom, officiating. The ceremony, which took place in front of the large parlor window banked in with roses and ferns, was performed in the presence of about 60 guests. Miss Hattie Pendreigh, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid, while the groom was assisted by his brother, Mr. T. E. McKeague, of Chicago. Miss Minnie Johnson, of St. Thomas, played the wedding march. After a sumptuous repast, Mr and Mrs McKeague left for a trip to Montreal, Boston, New York and Philadelphia previous to their departure to Chicago, where they will reside in the future. The groom’s gift to the bride was a diamond sunburst brooch and a similar one somewhat smaller to the bridesmaid. The waiters were also presented with very pretty gold brooches.

No attestation paper or Officer’s Declaration can be found for Agnes in Canadian records, and it is likely she was living in Chicago when she volunteered for nursing duty. Agnes returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in New York on August 30. The passenger lists names her next of kin as a brother, of 283 Furby Street, Winnipeg.

She died on April 29,  1951 in South Dorchester Township, and is buried in Aylmer Cemetery. Her obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, April 30, 1951:

MRS. AGNES McKEAGUE IS REMOVED BY DEATH

South Dorchester Woman Served in First War

SPRINGFIELD, April 30 – Mrs. Agnes McKeague, an esteemed resident of South Dorchester for nearly three-quarters of a century and a veteran of overseas nursing service in the First World War, died at the homestead, 7th Concession, South Dorchester, early Sunday morning, after an extended illness.

Born in Scotland, 78 years ago, a daughter of William and Isabel Pendreigh, Mrs. McKeague came to Canada with her parents at the age of four years. They pioneered the Pendreigh homestead in South Dorchester, where Mrs. McKeague died.

Mrs. McKeague was married to Joseph McKegue in 1905. He died in 1915. Shortly after her husband’s death, Mrs. McKeague enlisted in the V.A.D., and went overseas with a St. John Ambulance Association unit. She served through the remainder of the First World War.

She was a valued member of the Harrietsville Women’s Institute and for years was a member of Chalmers Presbyterian Church in Springfield, subsequently St. John’s United.

Surviving are three sisters, Miss Belle Pendreigh, South Dorchester; Miss Hattie Pendreigh, Aylmer; and Mrs. Sam (Janie) Arelan, Haldimand; and a brother, John Pendreigh, on the homestead.

Resting at the Shaw Funeral Home in Springfield where the funeral service will be conducted Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, by Rev. D’Arcy Copeland of Springfield. Interment in Aylmer Cemetery.

 

Russell Clark McKibbin

3137002  Russel McKibbon

Russell McKibbin was born on September 29, 1897 at Langton in Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, the son of Albert McKibbin & Catherine Smith.  Albert was born in Charlotteville township, the son of William & Sarah McKibbin and was living in North Walsingham when he was married on January 22, 1890 in Langton to Catherine Smith, of Langton, daughter of William & Charlotte Smith.

Russell was farming at Port Burwell when he was married on March 26, 1918 in Calton to Bessie Adell Kennedy (1894-1974), a native of Eden living in Malahide, the daughter of John Kennedy & Minnie Wilson.

He was farming at RR #1 Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on May 28, 1918 in London.

He died on June 27, 1978 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his wife. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 28, 1978:

FORMER AYLMER MAYOR DEAD AT 80

Russell McKibbin died following a long illness at the Whitehall Residence of Roscove, RR 2 Aylmer on Tuesday, June 27. He was 80 years old.  The son of the late Albert and Kate (Smith) McKibbin, he was born in Norfolk County.  Mr. McKibbin was a retired farmer in Malahide Township and had lived for 24 years in Aylmer.  He was a member of Aylmer Baptist Church.

He was on Aylmer Town Council in 1958; Deputy Reeve from 1959-60; Reeve from 1961-64; Warden of Elgin County in 1964 and Mayor of Aylmer from 1965-70.

Surviving are his second wife, Jennie (Atkinson) McKibbin. His first wife, Bessie (Kennedy) McKibbin, died in 1974. Also surviving are daughters, Mrs. Charles (Maxine) Phillips of RR 2 Aylmer; Mrs. Mervin (Greta) Wilson of St. Thomas, and Mrs. Nick (June) Balazs of Tillsonburg.  A brother, William, and a sister, Mrs. George (Myrtle) Deeg, died previously.

Surviving also are 10 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. The funeral service will be held Thursday, June 29 at 3:30 p.m. from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home with Rev. Donald Parsons of St. Thomas officiating. Burial will be made in the Aylmer Cemetery.

Walter Edmond McKibbin

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Walter McKibbin was born on March 9, 1898 at Langton in Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, the son of John Alvin McKibbin & Jennie Marshall.  Alvin was the son of William & Sarah McKibbin and was living in Walsingham when he was married there on March 3, 1887 to Jennie Marshall, also of Walsingham, the daughter of Edmond & Mary Ann Marshall.

Walter was living in Port Burwell employed as a butcher when he enlisted for service on May 31, 1918 in London.

He was living in Port Burwell when he was married on December 31, 1919 in Vienna to Alta Pearl McAllister (1902-1983), of Vienna, the daughter of James McAllister & Annie Campbell.

Walter died on July 3, 1975 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 9, 1975:

WALTER E. McKIBBON [sic]

Walter E. McKibbon [sic], of Port Burwell, died suddenly in Aylmer on Thursday, July 3rd.  He was 77 years of age.  He is survived by his wife, Alta Pearl McKibbon [sic]; one son, Stuart McKibbon [sic] of Port Burwell; one daughter, Mrs. Robert (Beulah) Ireland of Port Burwell; two sisters, Mrs. Lena Dark of Aylmer and Mrs. Gladys Welt of Jarvis; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Funeral was held in Tillsonburg on Saturday, July 5th, conducted by the Rev. William Stanley of North Broadway Baptist Church, Tillsonburg.  Burial was in Aylmer cemetery.

Emerson McKinnon

3131101

Emerson McKinnon was born on April 9, 1883 in Aylmer, the son of John & Mary McKinnon. John was born in Scotland about 1816.  He and Mary are found on the 1881 census in Springfield.  He died on March 21, 1888 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  His widow Mary and children are found on the 1891 census in Aylmer.

Emerson was living in Ingersoll employed as a block signaller maintainer on the railway when he enlisted for service on February 20, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his brother Joseph of Ingersoll.

He was married on March 18, 1918 in London to Viola Clingbile, a native of Windsor living in London, daughter of August Clingbile & Elizabeth Steirs.  His occupation is given as soldier, and his residence as London.    No further information can be found

William Harold McKnight

189150  William McKnight

(click name for photo – photo courtesy of Elgin County Archives)

William McKnight’s name is found in an Roll of Honor of men who enlisted, printed in the East Elgin Tribune, March 2, 1916.  He is described as of “Aylmer”.

William was born on September 19, 1899 in St. Thomas, the son of Michael McKnight & Christina Greig. He was baptized at Holy Angels Church in St. Thomas on May 4, 1900, where the record gives his middle name as Henry, and his date of birth as September 10, 1899.

Michael McKnight was born about 1855 in County Clare, Ireland, the son of John McKnight & Mary McMahon.  He was a widower living in St. Thomas employed as a machinist when he was married there on September 16, 1899 to Christina Greig, of St. Thomas,  a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and daughter of William Greig & Jettie Sangster.

William enlisted for service on September 18, 1915 in Aylmer.  He had served one year in the 30th Battery in Aylmer and names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Christina McKnight, of Aylmer. Following the war, William moved to Detroit where he is found on the 1920 census, working as a shoemaker in a shoe factory.  The record indicates he emigrated to the United States in 1919. Living with him is his widowed mother, Christina.

William died on July 5, 1972 in Columbus, Ohio.

 

William Henry McLain

189582  William McLain

William Henry McLain was born on June 17, 1900 in Yarmouth, the son of Robert Melvin McLain (1871-1940) & Ellen R. Keillor (1871-1937).  Robert was born in Yarmouth, the son of Robert McLain & Phoebe Adair.  He was living in Dexter, Yarmouth Township when he was married on November 29, 1893 in London to Ellen Keillor, also of Dexter, a native of London, Ontario, daughter of William & Christiana Keillor.  Robert & Ellen lived in Yarmouth before moving to Port Bruce after 1911.  They are buried in Plains Cemetery, Yarmouth.

William McLain was a farmer living in Port Bruce when he enlisted under age in St. Thomas on December 4, 1915.  He gave his date of birth as August 19, 1898. He enlisted with the 91st Battalion and went overseas in June 1916. He remained in England nearly two years and then transferred to a Scottish Regiment and went to France on May 10, 1918.  He was seriously wounded on August 15, 1918 and taken to No. 4 General Hospital. Unfortunately, William’s name was included in a list of men who had died of wounds, and his death was erroneously reported in the Aylmer Express of August 29, 1918,  accompanied by his photograph:

DIED OF WOUNDS

PTE. WILLIAM HENRY McLEAN

the son of Mr and Mrs Robert McLean, of Port Bruce.  

Pte. W. H. McLean went overseas with the 91st Battalion in June 1916.  He was only 16 years of age when he joined that Battalion and had been in England nearly two years.  He was transferred to a Scottish Regiment and went to France the 10th of May, was seriously wounded on the 15th of August and taken to No. 47 General Hospital.  His mother received a wire from Ottawa, Aug. 19th giving information and up to date no other special word has been received.  He was, however, listed in the papers of the 21st inst. as among those who had died of wounds.  Willie was a lad of good habits and the only representative of Port Bruce had in the great struggle for democracy.  His parents have the sincere sympathy of this community in their said bereavement, also his fiance, whose heart he won during his stay there.”

Not having received any correction to this error, his family had a funeral service for him. Apparently the family did not know he was alive until he returned from overseas. 

Following the war, William lived in Port Bruce. He was married in 1928 to Ruth Olga Walker (1911-2009), daughter of Isaiah & Sarah (Schram) Walker, of Port Burwell. 

William died on October 10, 1969.  He is buried in Aylmer cemetery with a military marker bearing the following inscription:

William H. McLain  Private 91 Battn. C.E.F.  10 Oct. 1969, age 69 

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 15, 1969:

WILLIAM McLAIN

William McLain, 69, of Port Bruce, died suddenly at the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital Friday morning.  Born at RR 1 Sparta, he has spent the past 56 years in Port Bruce.  He was a member of the Malahide United Church.

During the First World War he served with the 91st battalion of the Black Watch.  He is the son of the late Mr and Mrs Robert McLain. Surviving are his wife, the former Ruth Walker; sons Henry of Brownsville; James of Campbellville; Angus of London; Malcolm of St. Thomas; David of RR 2 Hamilton; Robert of St. Thomas and John at home; daughters Mrs. Robert (Jane) Roose, of Wallaceburg and Mrs. Clarence (Francis) Shelley of Wallacetown; brother Erman of Verona, Ont.  Also surviving are 24 grandchildren and one great grandchild.

The Rev. Charles Forrest of Malahide United Church conducted the service at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home in Aylmer on Monday afternoon. The pallbearers were Murray Buckler, Mel Pineo, Charles Pineo, John Hill, Cliff Wonnacott and Godfrey Hill. Burial was in Aylmer cemetery.

Friends and relatives were from Erieau, Cedarville, Port Dover, Kingston, Hamilton, Campbellville, Stoney Creek, St. Thomas, Hespeler, London, Galt, Thamesville, Wallacetown, Wallaceburg, Aylmer and district.

George Robert McLean

George McLean’s name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna. He was born at Vienna on October 1, 1888, the son of Robert McLean (1862-1945) and his wife Annie L. Brown (1868-1953), who are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

George moved to the United States about 1907 and settled in San Fransisco, California where he worked in road construction.

George’s name is found in military records of the United States.  He enlisted for service about 1917 at the age of 28, and was living at 682 Grove Street, San Francisco. He was not married and was employed as a superintendent of a grading outfit for Blanchard Brown Company.

 Following the war, he returned to San Francisco, where he was married to his wife Margaret, a native of Ireland.  By the 1930 census, they were living in Burlingame, San Mateo County, California where he continued to work as a superintendent of road construction.  He and his wife had two children, George Robert Jr. (Born about 1923) and Pearl (born about 1921). Another daughter, Gayle, was born after the 1930 census.

George died on March 26, 1941 in San Mateo County, California.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, April 1, 1941:

Word was received Thursday by Mr. and Mrs. Robert McLean, of the death of their only son, George R. McLean, of Burlingame, Calif. the deceased was in his 54th year and has been a resident of California for the past 36 years. He was a highway construction contractor by trade. Mr. McLean served in France in the last war as a member of A.E.F. Mechanical Transport Division. While in France he was a victim of poison gas and shell shock which left his health permanently impaired. 

He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, Margaret, one son, George Jr. two daughters, Mrs.Bud Brill, and Gayle in California; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. McLean of Vienna, two sisters, Mrs. John H. Teall, also of Vienna and Mrs. W. H. Kiser of Chatham.” 

Arthur James McMillan

477 / 675275

Arthur’s name is found in a Roll on Honor printed in the East Elgin Tribune, June 1, 1916 of men who had enlisted at Aylmer.

Arthur McMillan was born on January 4, 1897 in Ingersoll, the son of William McMillan (1872-1938) & Christina Anderson (1875-1941).  William was a butcher in Ingersoll. The family is found on the 1901 census in Ingersoll, but by 1911 had moved to Myrtle Street in Aylmer. They later returned to Ingersoll.

Arthur was employed in a feed store and not married when he enlisted for service in St. Thomas on January 20, 1915. He enlisted with the 33rd Battalion and his service number was 477.  He belonged to the 30th Battery C.F.A. in Aylmer. He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Christina McMillan, Box 510, Aylmer.

A second attestation paper exists for Arthur, dated January 20, 1916 at Ingersoll.  His address is given as Merit Street, Ingersoll. His occupation is given as driver, and his next of kin is named as his mother, of Ingersoll. He had served 8 months in the 33rd Battalion.  A new service number was given as 675275.  He enlisted with the 168th Battalion.

Arthur returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on April 4.  He returned to Ingersoll and  was married on May 8, 1919 in Woodstock to Gladys Irene Fairbanks (1900-1965) of Beachville, the daughter of Samuel Fairbanks & Sarah Ann Merrill. 

Arthur died on December 25, 1946. His obituary appeared in the Ingersoll Tribune, January 2, 1947:

WELL KNOWN VETERAN FOUND DEAD IN ROOM SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

When relatives became alarmed and instituted a search for Arthur McMillan, his body was found in his room in the Condos block on Sunday afternoon. The last time relatives had been in touch with him was Christmas Day when he enjoyed the festivities at the home of his brother, Clarence McMillan, Carroll St. He left there apparently in his usual health. On Sunday afternoon Clarence McMillan and a cousin, Roy McMillan, located the body and Dr. H. G. Furlong, coroner, estimated he had been dead about 4 days. It was determined that death was due to natural causes. The late Mr. McMillan had been known to have a heart condition that had caused alarm. A veteran of the war of 1914-1918, Mr. McMillan had been very well known, having served as a member of the Ingersoll Fire Department for a number of years and also as janitor of the municipal buildings. He was employed at the Ingersoll Machine and Tool Co., and lived alone in the Condos block. He was 50 years of age and is survived by four brothers, Ben, Windsor; John, Stanley and Clarence of Ingersoll and one son, William of Ingersoll. The funeral was held from the Fred S. Newman Funeral Home on Monday afternoon with service at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Carman J. Queen, rector of St. James’ Anglican Church. While the funeral was of a private nature, there was a large number of relatives present and numerous floral tributes to show respect to the memory of deceased. Interment took place at the Ingersoll Rural Cemetery and the pallbearers were Roy McMillan, Charles Guilford, Roy Johnson, Frank Anderson, Henry Anderson, and Russell Stringer

 

William Benjamin McMillan

400597

Benjamin’s name is found in a Roll on Honor printed in the East Elgin Tribune, June 1, 1916 of men who had enlisted at Aylmer.

Benjamin McMillan was born on March 13, 1895 in Ingersoll, the son of William McMillan (1872-1938) & Christina Anderson (1875-1941).  William was a butcher in Ingersoll. The family is found on the 1901 census in Ingersoll, but by 1911 had moved to Myrtle Street in Aylmer. They later returned to Ingersoll.

Benjamin was employed as a teamster and not married when he enlisted for service on January 20, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He had served one year with the 30th Battery in Aylmer.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. William McMillan of Aylmer.  This address was later crossed out and replaced with Ingersoll.

Benjamin returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 21. When his brother Arthur died in 1946, Benjamin was living in Windsor.

James Robert McNally

1045192

James McNally was born on April 3, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of James R. McNally.  The family moved to Winnipeg where they were living at 2316 Grand Ave., when James enlisted for service on August 23, 1916 in Windsor.  He was a student and not married.

Although there is a James McNally found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Aylmer with wife Harriet, they do not have a son enumerated with them. 

No further information can be found.

Dr. Ernest Wilson McNiece

Ernest Wilson McNiece was born on April 13, 1890 at lot 25, concession 14 in Sombra Township, Lambton County, the son of Henry Frank McNiece (1865-1923) &  Maria Wilson (1860-1918).Ernest McNiece Henry was born near Kingston, the son of John McNiece & Elizabeth Franklin, and was living in Sombra when he was married on September 25, 1882 in Bridgen, Ontario to Maria Wilson, a native of Middleton Township, Norfolk County living in Moore Township, Lambton County, the daughter of John Wilson & Rebecca Taylor.  Henry & Maria are buried in Woodland Cemetery, London.

Ernest was a physician living at R.R. #4 London when he enlisted for service as a Lieutenant with the C.A.M.C. on May 16, 1918 in London.  Following the war, Dr. McNiece moved to Springfield and set up a practice, later moving to Aylmer.  While living in Springfield, Dr. McNiece was married on October 20, 1920 in Fullarton, Perth County, to Ellen Pansy Colling, a native of St. George, Ontario living in London, the daughter of Rev. Thomas Colling & Ellen Ingram.  Following the death of his first wife, he was married to Pauline Fitzgerald, of London.

Dr. McNiece died on January 20, 1940 and is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 25, 1940, with this caption under his photograph: “Dr. Ernest W. McNiece, a beloved physician and surgeon in Aylmer for eighteen years and in Springfield for three years previously. He succumbed to a heart condition on Saturday evening last. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, he served overseas during the first Great War.

E. W. McNIECE PASSES

Beloved Aylmer Physician and Surgeon, Ill Eight Weeks

Dr. Ernest Wilson McNiece, one of Aylmer’s most beloved physicians and surgeons, died at his home here on Saturday evening, January 20th, following an illness of the past eight weeks. Dr. McNiece was in his 50th year and was born at Bridgen, Ont., a son of the late Henry and Maria McNiece. Graduating in medicine from the University of Western Ontario in 1918, he immediately went overseas with the medical corps. Returning to Canada in 1919, he set up practice in Springfield where he resided for three years. In 1922 he purchased the practice of the late Dr. F. F. McEwen in Aylmer and moved here, where he enjoyed the confidence, love and respect of the entire community. He was a clever physician and surgeon and no one, no matter what their circumstances, ever called upon him that he did not gladly and cheerfully respond. As Medical Officer of Health for both the town of Aylmer and township of Malahide, Dr. McNiece did splendid work and was responsible for much preventative work in medicine in the schools.

Dr. McNiece was a member of St. Paul’s United Church and of the Board of Stewards. He loved Masonry and was a Past Master of Malahide Lodge, No. 140 Aylmer; a Past First Principal of Aylmer Chapter 81, Royal Arch Masons, and a member of the London Lodge of Perfection. He was also a Past President of the Aylmer Branch of the Canadian Legion. He was fond of dramatics and for some years was president of the Aylmer Dramatic Club, taking an active part in the presentation of several plays.

He was twice married, his first wife Pansy Collings, of London, predeceasing him ten years. Later he married Pauline Fitzgerald, of London, who survives him. He is also survived by one daughter, Betty, and one son, David, both at home; two brothers, William of Byron and Milton, of Aylmer; two sisters, Mrs. George McRae, of Byron and Mrs. John McLachlan of Komoka.

A private funeral service was held at the home, Talbot street east, on Tuesday at 1:30 p.m., followed by a public service in St. Paul’s Church at 2 p.m. Rev. W. D. Stenlake, his pastor, had charge and was assisted by Rev. G. E. Wood, of King St. United Church, London, and his brother-in-law, Rev. Morley Colling.

The Funeral

The funeral was held on Tuesday afternoon.  A private service was held at the home at 1:30 o’clock, followed by a public service in St. Paul’s United Church at 2 o’clock. It was one of the largest funerals ever held in Aylmer, the auditorium of the church being filled to the back of the galleries. Rev. W. D. Stenlake, of St. Paul’s Church, hd charge and he was assisted by a former minister of the church, Rev. Gladstone E. Wood, of London. Both ministers paid sincere tributes of appreciation for the sel-sacrificing life and work of Dr. McNiece. During the service the congregation sang, “Abide With Me”, led by the church choir. Mrs. D. M. Halpenny presided at the pipe organ. Following the service hundreds of the late Doctor’s patients and friends filed past the bier. Relatives and friends attended from London, Komoka, Byron, Strathroy, Glencoe, St. Thomas, Springfield, Galt, Lambeth, Sheffield and Aylmer. Interment took place in the family plot in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, London. Members of Malahide Lodge No. 140 A.F. & A.M. attended in a body and the impressive Masonic burial service was held at the graveside with the Master of the Lodge, Stuart Clarke, presiding. Members of the Aylmer Post Canadian Legion, of which Dr. McNiece was a past president, acted as flower bearers and also formed a guard of honor. The flower bearers were H. Farrel, W. B. Curtis, H. Haggan, V. Brown, D. Chapman, B. Fuller, H. J. Price, Roy Morris, G. Watson, Dr. H. J. Davis, S. Varney, E. Jones, S. Humphrey, C. Porter, W. Cascadden and G. Warner.

The pallbearers were six classmates of the Class of 1918: Doctors J. F. C. Colling, Lambeth; C. W. Pennecott, M. C. Morrison, London; L. Freele, Glencoe; J. C. Seaton, Sheffield; E. L. Armstrong, Erie, Pa.; and F. C. Ferguson, London.

Honorary pallbearers were : Dr. J. W. Crane, Dr. S. Bean, Dr. E. Bartram, all of London;Dr. Freeman, Springfield; Dr. H. G. McLay, Dr. C. W. Sinclair, Dr. H. J. Hart and Dr. McLay Miller, of Aylmer; E. W. Haines, E. S. Livermore, K.C., and R. B. McKenney.

Archibald Earl McPhail

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Archibald McPhail was born on February 21, 1895 at Kingsmill in South Dorchester, the son of Duncan McPhail & Ann Jane (Jennie) Vincent.  Duncan was born in Yarmouth, the son of Archie & Euphemia McPhail and was a farmer labourer living in South Dorchester when he was married on August 30, 1892 in Sparta to Ann Jane Vincent, of Yarmouth, the daughter of Joseph & Kate Vincent.  They later moved to Windsor.

Archibald was a railway employee living at 31 Curry Ave., Windsor with his parents when he enlisted for service on October 1, 1918. 

No further information is known.

 

Douglas Herman McPherson

190168  Douglas McPherson

Douglas Herman McPherson was born in Union, Yarmouth Township on June 16, 1898, the son of Allan McPherson & Lottie Loop (1876- Nov. 27, 1918). Allan was born in Dunwich, the son of Hugh & Katie McPherson, but was living in Aylmer when he was married there on November 21, 1894 to Lottie Loop, also of Aylmer, daughter of Erastus Loop & Marilla (Annie) Felker. Lottie is buried in Aylmer cemetery with her parents.

Douglas is found on the 1901 census with his parents in Southwold Township. On the 1911 census, he is living with his mother and her parents in Aylmer.

Douglas  was a shoemaker living at 34 Hiawatha St., St. Thomas when he enlisted with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas on March 30, 1916.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Lottie, of Aylmer.

A letter from Douglas was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, October 12, 1916:

Somewhere in France, September 13, 1916
Dear Mother –
We are safe in France after about one day’s journey and I am going to write you a few lines because I said I would, and besides I never get tired writing to dear mother.

We can’t tell you as much now as we did in England because they are more strict here than they were over there, about things like that. Well, we don’t have to shine up here like we did in England and they are not so strict with you here that way. We get lots of good beef and dog biscuits now, I like the beef but don’t think much of the biscuits. I don’t think I will starve, do you?  There is a big German camp near here and we go up there for bayonet practice and bombing, but they won’t let the Canadians guard them because they don’t love them very well, you know, and I hope to get in the line soon to get at the devils.  They are the homeliest thing I ever saw. Some of the boys of the 91st are at them now.

Send lots of cigarettes and tobacco because I can handle it all, but don’t send chocolates or any fruits because they get smashed up and spoiled.  We are not allowed out of camp at all, only with a pass and you can only get one about once a month, but I don’t care. I am going to wait patiently for the time when I go up to join the rest of the boys at the front.

Well give my best wishes to Grandma and all the rest, and please don’t worry. Just sing the song that we do, “Pack all your troubles in your old kit bag and smile, smile, smile”. I will play it for you when I come back, just to see how you like it. Well I must close and go to bed. This letter was written on my mess tin.  Good-bye,

Your loving son, Douglas McPherson

A photo of Douglas with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Pte. D. McPherson, son of Mrs. Lottie McPherson, is an Aylmer boy, although born in Yarmouth. He is but 18 years old and enlisted in March last with the 91st Batt. He writes cheery letters home of how they are getting along in France”.

The Aylmer Express of January 1918 reported that “Aylmer soldier Douglas McPherson is seriously ill with pneumonia in a Canadian Hospital in England.”

While in England, Douglas was married in 1919 to Florence M. Evans.  She emigrated to Canada later that year, arriving in Quebec on August 25.  The passenger list gives her destination as Aylmer.  Douglas’ name cannot be found on a passenger list returning to Canada.

Douglas later moved to the United States, where he lived at Billings, Helena and Cascade, Montana.  He died on July 24, 1985 in Great Falls, Cascade County, Montana, at the age of 87 years.

Huron Duncan McPherson

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Duncan McPherson was born on June 20, 1895 in Port Burwell, the son of John Duncan McPherson & Annie Christine Young.  John was a mariner and the family is found on the 1901 census in Bayham. It is believed the family moved to Michigan about 1909.  It is not known if John died in Canada or in Michigan, but his widow was remarried to John Harkness and was living in Detroit in 1915.

Duncan enlisted for service on January 11, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. John Harkness of 767 Woodward Ave., Detroit.  Duncan’s address was not requested on the attestation paper.  He had served one year in the First Hussars and one year in the 23rd Regiment. 

Following the war, it is believed Duncan moved to Michigan.  The 1920 census shows a Duncan McPherson and his wife Ethel living in River Rouge, Wayne County, Michigan.  It states he emigrated to the United States in 1909 and is employed in the auto industry.

No further information can be found.

Daniel Lee McQuiggan

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Daniel McQuiggan was born on May 21, 1897 in Bayham, the son of Ozias McQuiggan (1856-1933) & Amelia Sophia McCaulley (1861-1917), who were married on March 1, 1882.  Ozias was the son of William McQuiggan & Elizabeth Pressey. Sophia was the daughter of William McCaulley & Caroline Balcom.  Ozias & Sophia are found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Bayham Township. They later moved to RR #1 Dunboyne where he was a farmer.  They are buried in Calton Cemetery.

Daniel was a cheesemaker living at Straffordville when he enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London.

He was married to Ada Palmer McKay (1896-1976), and died on October 10, 1992.  They are buried in Tillsonburg cemetery. Daniel’s obituary appeared in the London Free Press, October 13, 1992:

McQUIGGAN

At Elgin Manor, RR 1 St. Thomas, on Saturday, October 10, 1992, Daniel (Dan) L. McQuiggan of Elgin Manor, formerly of Tillsonburg, in his 96th year. Predeceased by his wife, the former Ada Palmer-McKay (1976). Dear father and step-father of Mrs. Lavine Channell and her husband Kenneth of Seal Beach, California; Kathleen German of Hamilton and Donald McKay of Collingswood, New Jersey. Also survived by one grandson, one great granddaughter and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by seven brothers and four sisters. Resting at the Ostrander’s Funeral Home, Tillsonburg for funeral service on Tuesday at 2 p.m. with Rev. James Taylor of Tillsonburg officiating. Interment at the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations to any charity gratefully appreciated by the family.

John Malcolm McVicar

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John McVicar was born on March 26, 1894 in South Dorchester, the son of Archibald J. McVicar (1865-1933) & Catherine Brown (1867-1941). Archibald was the son of John McVicar & Elizabeth McCaul, and was living in South Dorchester when he was married on September 30, 1890 in Belmont to Catherine Brown, of North Dorchester, the daughter Neil & Nancy Brown.  They lived at R.R. #1 Belmont, and are buried in Dorchester Union Cemetery.

John was a farmer living with his parents at R.R. #1 Belmont when he enlisted for service on May 29, 1918.

John died in 1975, and is buried in Dorchester Union Cemetery with his wife Shirley Hope Smith (1918-1994).

Wilfred Laurier Meharg

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Wilfred Meharg was born on May 4, 1899 at Glenmeyer in Norfolk County, the son of John F. Meharg (1868-1949) & Louisa Simpkins (1873-1944).  John was born in Houghton township, the son of John Meharg & Mary Jane McBride, and was farming there when he was married on March 23, 1898 in Middleton township to Louisa Simpkins, of North Walsingham, the daughter of William Simpkins & Margaret Webster. John & Louisa are buried in Tillsonburg Cemetery.

Wilfred was a farmer living at Vienna when he enlisted for service on April 3, 1916 in Ingersoll.

Following the war, Wilfred moved to Hamilton where he was employed as a steam fitter when he was married there on September 9, 1919 to Ilah Winnifred Ward, a native of Tillsonburg living in Hamilton, the daughter of Frank Ward & Elizabeth West.

Wilfred was remarried to Ona Franklin (1896-1949). They were killed in an automobile accident on May 4, 1949. They are buried in Tillsonburg Cemetery. An article about the accident appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, May 4, 1949:

ONE KILLED, TWO SERIOUSLY INJURED IN ACCIDENT 

ON BAYHAM TOWNSHIP ROAD

Wilfred Meharg, aged about 38, Tilbury, proprietor of the Tasty Lunch in that town, was almost instantly killed, his wife critically injured and his 6-year old son, Jimmy, suffered a broken leg and minor injuries in an accident on the Talbot road just below No. 3 Highway where it branches off No. 3 Highway five miles east of Aylmer to Richmond and Straffordville about two o’clock Wednesday afternoon.

The car they were in, driven by Mr. Meharg, was going west when it went out of control in a dip of the road at the Malahide-Bayham Townline intersection one-half mile south of No. 3 Highway and rammed the abutment of a small concrete bridge crossing a small stream at that point. The Meharg car crashed over the side of the bridge and hung upside down over the edge, badly wrecked, with the driver, his wife and boy trapped inside.  It was not until the car was brought back onto the bridge that they could be freed and it was then found the man was dead.

Mrs. Meharg, suffering critical head, chest and leg injuries, was taken unconscious from the car and rushed with her young son by Hughson ambulance to the Memorial Hospital, St. Thomas, where they arrived at 3:10 p.m. The hospital indicated there was small hope for the woman’s life and a priest was sent for shortly after they were admitted to administer last rites.

The Meharg car is believed to have been the only one involved in the accident and loose gravel may have contributed to the cause. Provincial Constable William Wellheiser, Straffordville, is investigating with assistance of officers from the O.P.P. detachment in St. Thomas.

Another article appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, May 6, 1949:

8-YEAR-OLD BOY ORPHANED SECOND TIME WHEN

FOSTER PARENTS KILLED IN CRASH

The tragic double fatality near Richmond Wednesday afternoon ended a happy birthday celebration when Wilfred Meharg was instantly killed and his wife, the former Ona Franklin, of the Vienna district, died about two hours later, leaving the eight-year old son Jimmy, whom they adopted as a baby, orphaned a second time.

The Mehargs, who have been operating the Tasty Lunch at Tilbury for the past year and a half or so, had spent the day visiting relatives throughout Bayham Township and the adjoining sections of Houghton, it being Mr. Meharg’s 50th birthday. They were on the way to visit other relatives in the Kingsmill district when the accident occurred in the dip of the road at the intersection of the Malahide-Bayham townline road and the old Talbot Road a half-mile from where it branches off No. 3 Highway five miles east of Aylmer.

That anyone escaped alive from the wreck is a wonder, and all the more that young Jimmy, first thought to have broken legs, appears to have escaped with nothing more than cuts and bruises and other minor injuries.  The Meharg’s 1948 Mercury was folded like a jack-knife back end up over the engine with the passengers squeezed in the fold.

Just before the accident, the car must have been traveling at extremely high speed, long skid marks leading back from where it crashed into the concrete abutment at one end of a small concrete bridge over a stream at the bottom of the dip in which the accident occurred. Tracing these marks back to where a heavy application of its brakes had first been made, Provincial Constable William Wellheiser, Straffordville, measured a course 233 feet long. The car had been proceeding westerly from the direction of Straffordville and Richmond toward No.3 Highway and Aylmer.

It first went out of control as it entered the dip and from the north side of the road, the skid marks veered to the south side and along the south shoulder for 94 feet of the total skid before it rammed head on into the bridge rail. Back end up and over, the car went over the rail of the bridge and upside down it was suspended there for an estimated half-hour afterwards with the three occupants trapped inside. It was not until it was got back up on the road that they could be extricated, the man being found dead. Mrs. Meharg unconscious and bleeding heavily from terrible injuries to her head, chest and legs, and the little boy screaming and shouting for rescuers to get him out.

One of the first to reach the scene was Noel Guy, whose farm is nearby, and other farmers gathered quickly along with drivers and passengers in other vehicles coming upon the scene. Among them was Constable Wellheiser, returning home to Straffordville from a trip to St. Thomas, who took charge immediately.  It was fortunate too that among the early arrivals at the scene was William Turner, of St. Thomas, driving a jeep equipped with a winch which was used to haul the wrecked car back to the road in an upright position.

Lyle Grant, Straffordville, and Andy Duff, of the St. Thomas district, were also on hand to help pry the twisted crumped passenger compartment of the car far enough to enable others to get Mrs. Meharg and Jimmy out. They were rushed to Memorial Hospital in the Hughson ambulance from Aylmer. Mr. Meharg’s remains then being taken to the Hughson Funeral Home in Aylmer.

Mrs. Meharg did not recover consciousness and it was evident when she arrived in hospital that she could not live long. An effort was made to reach an older adopted son, Donald, aged 14 or 16, working on a Tilbury district farm, but friends of the Mehargs at Tilbury could not locate him immediately. They informed the hospital that Mrs. Meharg was Catholic and a priest was summoned in time to administer last rites before she died about 4:20 p.m., a little more than two hours after the accident occurred.

Since the accident it has been learned that Mr and Mrs Meharg had decided to take the day off work at Tilbury on account of Mr. Meharg’s birthday and to make a trip to St. Thomas and visit relatives in East Elgin. Mr. Meharg worked most of the night at the restaurant and they finally got away on their travels about five a.m. from Tilbury.

They arrived at the Elgin County Home about seven a.m. and there visited with Mrs. Meharg’s father, George Franklin, making arrangements with Superintendent Gordon Turnbull to return in the afternoon and take Mr. Franklin back to Tilbury with them. The Mehargs then drove to Bayham Township and during the morning visited Mr. Meharg’s father, Robert Meharg at Port Burwell. Among others, they called on Mrs. Ethel Meharg, at Port Burwell, and are believed to have had lunch with Mr. Meharg’s cousin, Ross Meharg at Glen Meyer, leaving afterwards to go to Kingsmill to see Mr. Meharg’s brother, Lloyd, of that vicinity.  They had traveled through Straffordville and Richmond on the way to the Kingsmill district when the accident occurred.

Up to about two years ago, Mr and Mrs Meharg had been living in the Sparta district, share-cropping a farm near the village until they decided to go into business at Tilbury.  Since then they have made occasional trips back to this district, as they were on Wednesday. They were well known about Sparta and throughout Bayham Township.

The bodies of Mr and Mrs Meharg were removed to the Ostrander Funeral Home in Tillsonburg Wednesday evening. Dr. C. Sinclair, coroner, after examining the bodies at the Hughson Funeral Home in Aylmer, where they were first taken, said no inquest would be held.

Charles Albert Merritt

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Charles Merritt was born on June 1, 1899 in Compton, Sussex, England.  Little information can be found about him, but he may be the Charles B. Merritt who emigrated to Canada as a “Home Child” at the age of 12 with Dr. Barnardo’s party that left London, England on June 16, 1914 on the ship Corinthian, arriving in Quebec on July 1, 1914.  Although there is a discrepancy in the age, Charles may have enlisted underage.  There is a birth record found in English records for a Charles Bert Merritt in the July-September quarter of 1902, in Westbourne District, Sussex.

This family is found on the 1901 England census in Compton, Sussex.  The parents are James Merritt, age 60, a carpenter, born in Westbourne, Sussex.  His wife is Mary A. Merritt, age 40, also born in Westbourne. The children were: Elizabeth, 20, Alice, 19, Ernest, 16, Dorothy, 10, William, 8, Hilda, 2, and Edith, 10 months.  Hilda & Edith were born in Compton.

Charles Merritt was a farmer working in the Springfield area when he enlisted for service on September 17, 1917 in London.  He joined the 7th Regiment O.S. Company.  He gives his address as “care of Charles Moore, Springfield, Ont.”.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Alice Merritt of London, England.

No further information is known.

Edward Lee Middleton

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Edward Middleton was born on June 28, 1897 at Corinth, the son of James Albert Middleton (1850-1932) & Priscilla Stilwell (1864-1947).  James was born in Nova Scotia, the son of Edward Middleton & Lydia Adams.  He and Priscilla lived at lot 8, concession 8, Bayham.  They are buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin in Malahide Township.

Edward was a farmer living at Corinth when he enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London.  He died in 1980 and is buried with his parents in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin.

Glen Douglas Millard

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Glen Millard was born on May 29, 1891 in Vienna, the son of William H. Millard (1852-1931) & Irene C. Pritchard.  William was the son of Joseph & Jane Millard and was farming in Malahide when he was married on November 26, 1873 in Aylmer to Irene Pritchard, also of Malahide, the daughter of Cyrus Pritchard & Elizabeth VanVelzer.  William & Irene later moved to Toronto where he was a furniture dealer.  He is buried in Park Lawn cemetery, Toronto.

Glen Millard was a labourer living in Brantford when he was married there on October 11, 1910 to Margaret Mutch, of Toronto, the daughter of George Mutch & Ellen McKeegan.

Glen was employed as a waiter and living at 33 Palace Street, Brantford when he enlisted for service on September 6, 1915 in Niagara.  He joined the 84th Battalion C.E.F.

Glen’s name is found in a special issue of the Brantford Expositor, December 1916, where a “Brantford and Brant County Honor Roll” lists him as serving in the 84th Battalion, and that he had suffered a gunshot wound in the chest.  His address is given as 7 Mary Street.

Glen returned from overseas because of his injuries in 1917, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on January 7.

Glen died on January 2, 1961 and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Flamborough East, Wentworth County with his wife Margaret Mutch (1891-1964). His obituary appeared in the Hamilton Spectator, January 2, 1961:

MILLARD – At his residence, 131 Duke Street, on Monday, January 2, 1961, Glen Douglas Millard, beloved husband of Margaret Mutch, and father of Lloyd William Millard, of Hamilton, and Mrs. Bert Rodwell (Bernice) of North Bay,and Mrs. Douglas Bell (Marjorie), Calgary, Alberta. Resting at the Blatchford and Wray Chapel, Main Street and West Avenue, for service on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Interment in Woodland Cemetery.

John William Millard

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John Millard was born on May 13, 1892 in Glencolin according to his attestation paper. However, his birth registration gives the date of birth as May 16, 1893 in Malahide (Luton).  He was the son of Raymond Leroy Millard (1869-1931) & Syra Irena Smith (1868-1945).  Leroy was born in Malahide, the son of Henry Eber Millard & Susan Raymond, and was farming in Bayham when he was married there on March 31, 1886 to Irena Smith, also of Bayham, the daughter of Lyman & Martha Smith.  They are buried in Straffordville cemetery.

John was a farmer at Straffordville when he enlisted for service on March 14, 1918 in London. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on June 16.

There is a John Millard (1894-1982) buried in Straffordville cemetery with his wife Myrtle (1903-1996). No information could be found to verify if it is the same man.

Lyman Eber Millard

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Lyman Millard was born on July 4, 1886 in Bayham, the son of Raymond Leroy Millard (1866-1931) & Syra Irene Smith (1868-1945).  Raymond Leroy was born in Malahide, the son of Henry Eber Millard & Susan Raymond, and was farming in Bayham when he was married there on March 31, 1886 to Irene Smith, of Bayham, the daughter of Lyman Hicks Smith & Martha Margaret Hortwick. They are buried in Straffordville cemetery.

Lyman was a labourer living in Bayham when he was married on March 7, 1906 at St. Williams to Gertrude Fick, of Port Rowan, the daughter of Stephen Fick & Esther Wheeler.

Lyman was a machinist living at 25 Wellington Street, Brantford when he enlisted for service on June 13, 1917 in Hamilton.  

No further information is known.

Milton Millard

400113

Milton Millard was born on July 1, 1897 in Springfield, the son of Roland Millard (1876-1903) & Ella Cascadden.  Roland was born in Malahide, the son of Noah & Thirza Ann Millard, and was a farmer living in Springfield when he was married on July 1, 1896 in Luton to Ella Cascadden, also a native of Malahide living in Springfield, the daughter of Augustus & Phoebe Cascadden.  Following Roland’s death, Ella moved to Niagara Falls and later married Robert Crawford, living at 43 Simcoe Street, Niagara Falls.

Milton enlisted for service on January 16, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He was a labourer and named Mrs. A. Cascadden, his guardian, as next of kin.  This is likely his grandmother.  It is not known if he was discharged, but another attestation paper bearing the same service number exists when he enlisted for service on July 24, 1918 at Niagara on the Lake.  His occupation is given as railroader, and his address is 43 Simcoe Street, Niagara Falls.  He lists his mother, Mrs. Robert Crawford, of the same address, as his next of kin.  He had served three months in the 33rd Battalion.

He returned from overseas on July 3, 1919, arriving in Halifax.

Milton was married to Mildred Doran, and was killed in an accident at work in December 1928 at the age of 31. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, December 21, 1928:

THE LATE MILTON MILLARD

Charles Cascadden has returned from Niagara Falls, where he was called on account of the tragic death of his nephew, Milton Millard, who was crushed to death between two cars in the yards of the M.C.R. while attending to his duties as brakeman. Death was instantaneous.  Mr. Millard was born in Springfield, being the son of the late Roland Millard and his wife, now Mrs. Crawford, of Niagara. He was a bright little fellow, and attended the school here till his removal.  He served overseas during the greater part of the war. About eight months ago he married Miss Mildred Doran of Niagara Falls, who survives him, as do also his stepfather and mother, Mr and Mrs Robert Crawford, and his only sister, Mrs. Stanley Hutchings, all of Niagara.  The funeral was held from the home of Mr and Mrs Robert Crawford. He was thirty-one years of age.

Arthur Stanley Miller

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Arthur Miller was born on March 28, 1898 at Corinth, the son of Charles William Miller & Alice Lavina Argent.  Charles was born in Bayham, the son of William & Sarah L. Miller, and was a farmer there when he was married on July 25, 1898 to Alice Argent, a native of London, England living in Bayham, the daughter of Henry Charles & Rose Etta Argent.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Dereham Township, and on the 1911 census in East Oxford Township, Oxford County. They later moved to Woodstock where they were living at 18 Chapel Street in 1918.

Arthur was employed as a pipe fitter, living with his parents at 18 Chapel Street, Woodstock when he enlisted for service on May 27, 1918 in London.  

Arthur was employed as a tinsmith, living in Woodstock, when he was married there on June 27, 1925 to Annie Gertrude West, of East Zorra, the daughter of Albert West & Gertrude Tice.

No further information is known.

Floyd Emery Miller

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Floyd Miller was born on May 17, 1892 in Springfield, the son of Minard Miller (1860-1938) & Martha May Johnson (1860-1946).  Minard was the son of William & Sarah Miller and was living in Bayham when he was married on October 28, 1881 in Ingersoll to Martha Johnson, of Dorchester, the daughter of William & Emily Johnson. They are buried in Dorchester Union cemetery.

Floyd was living in London employed as a porter when he was married there on September 22, 1917 to Elsie Richert, a native of Tacoma, Washington, living in Belleville, Michigan, the daughter of Louis Richert & Matilda Rassman.

Floyd was living at 174 Maple Street, London employed as a salesman when he enlisted for service on July 15, 1918.

No further information is known.

George Miller

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George Miller was born on April 1, 1895 in London, England.  He emigrated to Canada as a “Home Boy” from the Barnardo Home on the ship Sicilian, arriving in Quebec on June 10, 1910.  He lived with the family of Alex & Eliza Crawford in South Dorchester, where he is found on the 1911 census.

George was a farmer living at R.R. #1 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 13, 1916 in London.  He had served eight months in the 30th Battery.  He names his friend, James Crawford, of R.R. #1 Belmont as his next of kin.

A letter from George was printed in the Aylmer Express, January 1, 1918:

APPRECIATES THE EXPRESS IN FRANCE

The following letter written to Mr and Mrs Richard Whyte, of this place, by Pte. George Miller, a former Malahide boy, tells how much home news is appreciated over there:

“Just received your most ever welcome letter of the 21st October. I can tell you folks, one can’t write too often to a boy so far away from home. Every letter and each word of them is carefully read by anxious eyes. Yes, I wrote and told you I was not receiving the Express, but I have received them since. Thank you for every one of them. Not a paragraph of them is left unread by me. It comes from that dear place called home. I am enclosing a piece of poetry written by myself and if the censor is kind they will let it go through. I am now in France getting nearer and nearer the front line. By the time you receive this letter I shall have seen real service and hope to be spared to tell you of my experience.  I am living like a prince over here. Nothing to do at present as we are resting. Received a grand letter from my dear friend and only chum, Jim. He wants to leave his job as he is getting tired of it, poor boy. I wish I could be with him again. Well, I hope to have the pleasure of getting word from you again. Wishing you both the best of health and happiness, George Miller.

A marriage record was found that might be for the above George Miller.  There is a George Miller, age 26, born in London, England, son of Thomas Miller & Elizabeth Tyreman, living in Owen Sound, employed in a factory, Disciples religion, who was married on August 3, 1921 in Goderich, to Ethel May Wootton, a native of Guelph living in Goderich, daughter of Thomas Wootton & Elizabeth Blood.

Norman Miller

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Norman Miller was born on November 1, 1889 in Malahide, the son of Clinton Miller (1861-1928), a farmer, & Annie Prong (1862-1925).  Clinton was born in Malahide, the son of Albert Miller & Lydia Whitesell, and was married in Malahide on March 13, 1883 to Annie M. Prong, a native of Houghton township living in Malahide, the daughter of John & Henrietta Prong. Clinton & Annie are buried in Luton cemetery.

Norman was a school teacher, and on the 1911 census he was living in Seaforth, Huron County.

Norman enlisted for service on July 3, 1916 in Kingston, where he was living at 201 University Ave.  He was a teacher and was not married.

A letter from Norman was printed in the Aylmer Express, May 10, 1917:

NORMAN MILLER ANXIOUS TO GET TO FRANCE

Has Been Quarantined Twice in England. Hears Many Rumors Over There

Witley Camp, Surrey

Dear Mother –

From my last letter you will be wondering whether I have got to France, so I am writing to tell you that I am, as usual, in quarantine. This is the third time. We were just a week out of the measles quarantine after being in for 17 days. During this week we were preparing to leave fro France with the 82nd battery, had our medical examination, inoculated the horses, got full equipment for the horses and wagons, and then on the morning of the very day we expected to leave, someone took the mumps and our hut was quarantined. You never saw a sicker looking bunch of men than we were that day. We had done a lot of work on our horses and harness, had our final inspection and everything was in good shape. Our places were taken by another bunch of men and they left the other night. We were quarantined last Wednesday. This one will last 28 days, so that it will be the middle of April before we get out. I haven’t been so disappointed over anything so much for a good while.

As I told you before we are not confined to the hut. We have three stables quarantined and we take care of the horses and mules and go out on exercise rides. I have just came in from one. Yesterday we had a long ride through roads and commons. It was a perfect Sunday afternoon and from the hills on the common where we were there is a fine prospect. We walked, trotted and cantered by turns as we had no officers with us, we enjoyed ourselves thoroughly. This afternoon there was a mist driving with the wind so it was not so pleasant. Also I had a different horse, which evidently hails from western Canada. When we had gone a mile or so, she decided that her riders was a greenhorn and intimated that I should dismount. After a short performance I decided that discretion was the better part of valor and got off.

There are a lot of huts in quarantine, almost a third of the camp, I should say. Our evenings we spend playing quoits, or rather horseshoes, cards and checkers, and reading. Quarantine has one advantage, that we have leisure to follow the war news. (Have you seen the cartoon of the man in the dugout who wished he could get a paper so he could see how the war was going?) And the news is particularly worth following just now. A good deal of artillery is going from Witley and there is a prospect that the camp will be largely cleared out. We hear enough rumors in a day to fill a book, and the gloomiest one always is that we shall never see France, for no one likes the thought of going back to Canada without having been to France. I was sitting next to an infantry man in the “Y” one night writing letters. He was amusing himself in the intervals by drawing devices on a saucer in front of him. One of them which he made very good was “France or Canada”. That’s the way the soldiers feel. Of course the soldier is never satisfied. When in Canada he cannot wait to get overseas, when in England it is “France or Canada”, and when in France he sings “Take me back to Blighty”.

My transfers have played the mischief with my mail and I have had none for 2 or 3 weeks. Some of it will probably go to France now, where I should be but for this fool quarantine. The weather is getting fine and mild, the mud is mostly dried up and I saw some fields ready for seeding. It will be sugar making time at home, I suppose.

The address below will do for the present. I had thought of writing to the Aylmer Express, but in quarantine, a man does not find much to write about. You may hand them this letter if you wish.

Yours, Norman 

Norman Miller, No. 342809, 4th D.A.C., 4th section, C.F.A., Army Post Office, London, Eng.

Following the war, he returned to Kingston where he was again a teacher when he married Grace Helen Jeffrey (1894-1984) on June 6, 1921 in Ottawa.  Grace was a civil servant born in Buffalo, New York, but living in Ottawa, the daughter of Charles William Jeffrey & Laura Jones.  They lived in Kingston following their marriage.

Norman died on May 31, 1984 in Kingston. He is buried in Cataraqui Cemetery, Kingston.

Wilfred Blake Miller

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Wilfred Blake Miller was born on November 30, 1896 in Malahide, the son of Henry Miller (1873-1936) & Rosa Leah Pound (1879-1958).  Henry was a farmer and born in Malahide to Daniel Miller & Nancy Cottington.  He was married to Rosy on May 8, 1893 in Malahide.  She was born in Malahide, the daughter of Stephen & Sarinda Pound.  Henry & Rosy are buried in Aylmer Cemetery.

Sometime after 1911, the family moved to R. R. #2 Mossley where Wilfred was living when he enlisted with the 135th Battalion on January 26, 1916 in Dorchester.  He was a farmer and not married. Wilfred returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 17.

Following the war, Wilfred moved to St. Thomas where he was living at 5 West Ave., and employed as a brakeman on the railroad when he married Eva May Coombs on August 4, 1923 in London.  Eva was a St. Thomas native, the daughter of Frederick James Coombs & Mary Jane Bower.

Wilfred died on October 14, 1954 and is buried in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas, with his wife Eva May (1897-1976). His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, October 15, 1954:

WILFRED MILLER CALLED BY DEATH

Wilfred Blake Miller, for a number of years with the Western Dairy in St. Thomas and latterly operator of the British American service station at Hiawatha and Curtis streets, died in the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital, unexpectedly, Thursday afternoon, aged 57 years.

Born in Dorchester, Ont., Mr. Miller came to St. Thomas 35 years ago. A man of genial disposition, he was popularly known as “Hap” Miller.  He was in the service station business for ten years, operating in the partnership with Max McQuiggan. Owing to ill health, the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Miller retired. However, during the last several months his health had improved and he had become associated with the Cox Cab Company. He was stricken with a fatal heart attack early Thursday afternoon near the intersection of Ross and Wellington streets, while responding to a call for a taxicab.

Mr. Miller had an excellent record of service in the First World War, enlisting and going overseas with 135th Battalion. He served for the duration of the war. He was a member of First United Church, St. Thomas; of Branch No. 41 of the Canadian Legion, and of Springfield Lodge, A.F. & A.M.

Surviving Mr. Miller are his widow, Mrs. Eva May Miller at the residence, 37 Jackson street, St. Thomas; son, Ronald B. Miller, 37 Jackson street; St. Thomas; his mother, Mrs. Rosy Miller, Aylmer; eight sisters, Mrs. A. McElheram, London, Ont.; Mrs. Jack Wettlaufer, Phoenix, Arizona; Mrs. Arthur Parks, Windsor, Ont.; Mrs. Wilfred Bingham and Mrs. Jack Wallin, Detroit; Mrs. Louise White, Niagara Falls, Ont.; Mrs. Kenneth Howe, Port Credit; and Mrs. Robert Harp, Brownsville, Ont.; two brothers, Harold Miller, Redan street, and Kenneth Miller, Maple street, both of St. Thomas; and a number of nieces and nephews.

Resting at the P. R. Williams and Son Funeral Home where the funeral service will be conducted Saturday afternoon, starting at four o’clock, by Rev. R. B. Craig of First United Church. Interment will be made in Elmdale Memorial Park.

John Mills

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John Mills was born on April 16, 1890 at Lakeview in Malahide, the son of Richard Mills (1862-1927) & Eliza Mansion [Manchen] (1871-1952). Richard Mills was born in Langtry, Devon, England, the son of John & Mary Mills, and was a mechanic and blacksmith living in Yarmouth when he was married on July 6, 1889 in Port Stanley to Eliza Mansion, and native and resident of Yarmouth, daughter of William & Elizabeth Mansion.  After living at Lakeview during the 1890’s, they returned to Yarmouth township, living on the Sparta road.  They are buried in Union cemetery.

John Mills was a labourer living in St. Thomas when he was married on December 27, 1910 in St. Thomas to Bessie Kate Nunney (1891-1975), also of St. Thomas, the daughter of Frederick T. Nunney & Clara Birth.

John was living at 14 John Street, St. Thomas and working as a stationery fireman when he enlisted for service on February 16, 1916 in London. He returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on June 4.

John died on December 31, 1957 and he and Bessie are buried in West Avenue Cemetery, St. Thomas.

John’s obituary, accompanied by his photograph,  appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, December 31, 1957:

JOHN MILLS, 67, WAR VETERAN, SUFFERS FATAL HEART ATTACK

John Mills, 67, of 9 Weldon avenue, died at his residence Tuesday morning.  He had been in poor health for several years and suffered a sudden and fatal heart attack this morning. Born in Lakeview on April 16, 1890, he was a retired New York Central stationary fireman. He went to Union from Lakeview when five years of age and to St. Thomas at the age of 21. Serving overseas in the First World War with the Canadian Engineers he was severely gassed.  Mr. Mills was a member of Branch No. 41 Canadian Legion, Oddfellows and The Camp Oddfellows, Woodmen of the World and the Brotherhood of Stationary Fireman and Engineers.  His parents were the late Eliza Manchen and Richard Mills.  His wife was the former Bessie Nunney.  Besides his wife he is survived by one son and one daughter, William at home; Mrs. Thomas W. (Irene) Spendelayh, London, Ont.; two brothers, Ross Mills, 39 St. Anne’s place, and Richard Mills, in England; two sisters, Mrs. Clara Schultz, 57 Kains street, and Mrs. Harold D. Galloway, 43 Alexandria avenue; three grandchildren, Tommy and Irene Spencelayh and Violet Ann Mills; also several nieces and nephews. At rest at the L. B. Sifton funeral home and the funeral will take place from there on Thursday at 3:30 o’clock. Rev. R. W. Lane of St. John’s Anglican Church, will have charge of the service. Interment will be in St. Thomas cemetery.

John Dugald Mills

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John Mills was born on January 17, 1892 in Springfield, the son of Dugald Alexander Mills (born 1864) & Ella Bryce (born 1866). Dugald was born in Springfield, the son of John B. & Jane Mills and was a merchant there when he was married on February 18, 1890 in Springfield to Ella Bryce, also of Springfield, the daughter of James & Eliza Bryce. They later moved to St. Justine Station, Vaudrieul, Quebec.

John was a medical student when he enlisted for service on March 27, 1915 in Kingston.  He named his next of kin as his father, of the above address in Quebec.

Following the war, John graduated as a physician and was living at 1218 Davenport Road in Toronto when he was married on August 16, 1922 in Braeside, Renfrew County to Mary Belle McKinnon, a nurse, of Braeside, the daughter of Archibald McKinnon & Isabella Carmichael.

No further information is known.

Clarence Robinson Miners

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Clarence Miners was born on June 4, 1895 in Aylmer, the son of Frederick Miners (1863-1925) & Mary Robinson (1865-1921).  Frederick was born in Dereham Township, Oxford County, the son of George & Mary Miners.  He was a teamster living in Aylmer when he was married there on December 13, 1893 to Mary Robinson, a native of Wawanosh Township, Huron County, living in Brownsville, the daughter of James & Catherine Robinson.  The family moved from Aylmer to Dereham township, where they are found on the 1901 and 1911 census.

Clarence was living at 20 Cartwright Street, London, employed as a railroad freight clerk, when he enlisted for service on November 1, 1915 in London.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Cathleen.  Clarence returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on January 18.

Clarence’s first wife was Kathleen May Gardiner. He was remarried in London on November 7, 1932 to Edith Weaver (1897-1976), a native of England, daughter of John Weaver & Mary E. Limbrick.  Clarence was living at 656 Lorne Ave., London, employed as a railway clerk.

He died on January 3, 1958 and is buried with Edith in Woodland Cemetery, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, January 4, 1958:

MINERS – Suddenly on Friday, January 3, 1958, Clarence Robinson Miners, of 37 Linwood street, beloved husband of Edith (Weaver) in his 63rd year. Resting at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, Wortley road at Elmwood avenue, where funeral service will be held in the chapel on Monday, January 6 at 3:30 p.m. Interment in Woodland Cemetery. Masonic memorial service in charge of Union Lodge No. 380 A.F. & A.M., Sunday evening at 8:30 o’clock.

 

Harry Verne Mitchell

123484  Verne Mitchell

Verne Mitchell was born on August 4, 1892 in Aylmer, the son of John Franklin Mitchell (1858-1914) & Clara S. Light (1868-1946).  John was born in Sparta,  the son of David & Sarah Mitchell, and was employed as a marble cutter in Aylmer when he was married there on November 7, 1888 to Clara Light, also of Aylmer, daughter of William & Elizabeth Light.  John died in 1914 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. Clara is also buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Verne was a printer living in Aylmer when he was married there on November 27, 1912 to Laura Jean L. Wisson, daughter of William G. & Margaret Wisson. Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 5, 1912:

A couple of our popular young people were quietly married last Wednesday evening at the Baptist parsonage by the Rev. Mr. Welch, viz: Miss Laura G. Wisson and Mr. H. Verne Mitchell, son of Mr and Mrs Jno. Mitchell, of John St. South. They have a host of friends who will wish them God speed o’er the rocky paths of life, and hope that happiness and good luck will attend them throughout. They will reside in Aylmer in the home lately purchased by the groom on John St. South.

Verne enlisted for service on September 14, 1915 in Aylmer.  He had belonged to the 30th Battery for one year. He enlisted with the 91st Battalion but was transferred to the 70th Battalion on November 6, 1915.

A photo of Verne with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Pte. H. V. Mitchell was born and raised in Aylmer and at the time of enlisting was employed at the Aylmer Express. He has worked at the printing business for a number of years and was well known to residents of Aylmer. His wife and three children reside on John street south. He is now attached to the 21st Batt.”

A letter from Verne was printed in the Aylmer Express, July 27, 1916:

91ST BATTALION IS WELL LOCATED IN ENGLAND

Had Most Enjoyable Trip, and Were Used Like Kings, Writes Corporal H. V. Mitchell,

a Former Member of the Express Staff, Now With the 91st O.S. Battalion
Can Hear the Big Guns in France at Their Camp at Westenhanger

Messrs. Barnecott & Monteith:

Dear Sirs:
Gave you my word when I left that I would write you a letter of my trip when I arrived in England; so I will try and give you the most of it, and hope if may prove interesting to you.

We left St. Thomas on Sunday evening at 5:30, in two sections, over the M.C.R., and had a good fast ride as far as Hagersville, where our section had two large engines hooked on, and these took us over the G.T.R. to Hamilton. We had a good view of the beautiful scenery around the mountain, and arrived at Hamilton at 8:25 p.m., as it was just getting dark. Leaving Hamilton we sped on until at 9:40 we reached Toronto, which at that time was pretty quiet. We then went to bed on our seats and bunks, and work up about 4 a.m., at which time we were at Belleville.

There was nothing of importance until we arrived at St. Henri, where we detrained and had a half hour route march to straighten out our limbs; and we were all ready for it. At 9:15 we left Montreal and passed over the Victoria Bridge, across the St. Lawrence. The bridge as 25 spans. Passed under Mount Royal at 10:40, and the next place of interest was Pointe St. Charles, about eight miles from the quaint old city of Quebec. We were very sorry we did not go right into Quebec, but hope to be able to visit it when we come back again.

On Tuesday we were still on the train, and were speeding down the line as before, passing such places as Campbelton, where we changed engines again; Potter, N.B., where there is a large college, 350 feet long, five storeys high, and 100 feet wide. We went on then until we came to Monckton, N.B., and stopped for an hour for a route march through the city. This is an old city all right, and looks very funny beside our up-to-date ones. But the people here seem to be good and healthy, so they must do some business.  Nearly all the buildings at Monckton are of the frame type.

At 5:30 we passed through Amherst, where there is a large internment camp for Germans and Austrians, and they gave us a very pleasant look. This little city has chiefly woollen and piano factories.

Wednesday, 28th, saw us at Halifax, and we were up and out of the train at 5:30 a.m. We marched to the boat and embarked at 12 o’clock noon, on one of the finest ships afloat. She was certainly a beauty, and carried on this trip nearly 7,000 troops. We were assigned to our compartments for sleeping, and then we started on a hunt for our dining room. Bert Richardson, P. Crawford, and myself made a party, and you can talk al you like about New York, Detroit, or any of the other cities being easy to get lost in, but that ship had them all beaten forty ways. We were down one stairway and up the other, and through corridors and in to hallways, but not a find could we make. We gave it up finally, and asked a steward where we were and told him where we wanted to go. He directed us, and we were just standing around a corner from the place we wanted to find.

We waited patiently all day for the boat to pull out, but she never left until early morning of the next day (Thursday), and then just pulled out into midstream and dropped anchor. Well, it meant more wait for us, and we bore it patiently. About eight o’clock at night we saw some signs of life from the ship, and away we went, with a destroyer in front. Talk about speed on the water – why, those destroyers make Barney Oldfield look as if he was going slow.  Had a good sleep that night in our hammocks, being up bright and early next morning to see if we could get a fast glimpse of Canada. We went out on deck and scanned the sky for a long time, but Old Canada was out of sight. We must have made great speed that night. We noticed also that the destroyer had gone.

Saturday was a very foggy day, and the fog whistle was blowing every thirty seconds.  Sunday, 2nd, we were running with increased speed, and we were living like kings. Good meals!  Good night, we had everything that was going – stewed rabbit! What do you know about that for Aylmer boys!  It rained a little today, but not enough to keep us inside. Monday, 3rd, was a fine day, but we must have been up near the North Pole, as it was bitterly cold, and we had our overcoats on. Tuesday, July 4th – a fine day, but very cold. On the lookout for suspicious craft.  Wednesday, July 5th – we got up at 3:30 and got a glimpse of the north and east coast of Ireland. This was a beautiful sight, the sun shining on the green fields, with the white cottages, looked as fine a picture as anyone could wish to see. Next view was the Isle of Man. This is a large island, and is an equal distance from England, Ireland and Scotland. The people on this island speak their own language, called Manx. They also have their own government, but are protected by Britain.  The land then almost faded from sight when we got into the Irish Sea, and we saw nothing else until we were pulling into the harbour at Liverpool.

We arrived at this beautiful city at 3:25 p.m., and disembarked at 4:15 here, and we enjoyed it, too. We left Liverpool at 6:10 and such little, small engines and coaches made us laugh. But they have our railroads beaten a mile for system. They have men on these trains, who are called guards, who do not bother with your tickets, which are collected on leaving the station at which you wish to disembark, or at the station previous to your destination. The guards just look after the train.  On the freight trains the brakemen, or shunters, as they are called, are at every station, and when a car has to be taken off, he is on the job with a pole with a spiral hook on the end, with which he uncouples the cars. That method saves lots of accidents. Their road bed in like glass, and they can go like the dickens.

We passed through some very beautiful scenery on the way to London. Ran through the Metropolis at night, so did not have much chance of viewing the city. We landed at Westenhanger at 2 a.m. on Thursday, July 5th – just exactly ten days from the time we left St. Thomas. Well, we went right to our camp and are now settled quite comfortably. The English Channel is visible from here, and we have a nice breeze all the time. We were inspected by the “big push” over here, and pronounced all right, I guess, because we haven’t been allowed to get out of camp since.

Well, this is all I can say for now, only that I took part in a ball game, in which we beat the 89th by 7-6 in a hard-fought game – yours truly bringing in the winning run in the ninth, with two out. Oh, they can’t beat those Elgin boys, and when it comes to a pinch, why, we will show Mr. Fritz about that game he is playing. We can hear the big guns over here quite plain.

Will close for now with best regards to you all.  I remain,

Corp. H. V. Mitchell, No. 123484, A. Coy. 91st O.S. Batt., C.E.F. Army Post Office, London, Eng 

A letter from Verne appeared in the East Elgin Tribune, October 19, 1916:

Somewhere in France, September 20th
L. Anger, Aylmer, Ont –
Dear Jim – Hope this letter will find you well as it is now about three months since I left the old home town. I do not know much that is going on there, as I have not yet received any papers from the old town. Suppose everything is going smooth at the “Tribune”, and you are doing lots of work. Well, Jim, I will endeavor to give you a few of the facts about the training we receive in this country. We left England on the twentieth of August and arrived in this country without any serious mishaps, except some of the boys were a little seasick coming over as it was much rougher than our trip across the ocean. However, we landed right side up and disembarked and had a march of about seven miles to our camp, where we were equipped with, first the Ross rifle, and afterwards, the short Lee-Enfield. The first impression this country gave us was, “Why it is just like Canada, and much different than England”. The next day we were inspected by the officer commanding and then started our final training under officers and N.C.O.’s of the British Army, mostly of the Guards division, Coldstream, Grenadier, Irish, etc., who have all seen service in the field. These instructors can teach you more about the art of warfare than all the rest we have ever had. They have “played the game” and they know. They have all great praise for the Canadians you know, fight side by side and the two are some combination. They can whip their weight in big iron. Well the first day we went through the gas and were told all about it and we soon found out that our helmets were proof against the deadliest forms of this dirty way of trying to kill men. The tear gas was next and you had to walk through a narrow trench and keep your head down too, for if you didn’t they had a beam placed across it, covered with a blanket and you soon bumped your noodle. The next day we had a small sham battle to teach us what it was like to capture a trench. Then we had bombing and were taught how to throw these little “Hun killers” and they certainly are well made in every detail. Then comes bayonet fighting which is very interesting as you go through numerous trenches with dummy Germans in them and stab away at will and it makes you imagine you are in the real game. Then last came our musketry and a little shooting combined with it to try out our rifles and our training was finished. This is quite hard training but it is so interesting that one does not mind it at all, and when one goes to bed at night one can sleep like a top. This is a large camp and all Canadian troops pass through here on their way to the firing line. We get fair meals here and there seems to be plenty for all. Harold Haggan is in the tent with me, and also Wilfrid Howse, and it is nice to have some of your own town boys with you, I can tell you. There is not much more to tell you but hope that all the Aylmer boys may come back safe to see the “old town”.

I see the London Free Press every two weeks. It is sent here in bundles and I don’t see much news about Elgin County. Would you please send me a few copies of your paper and I will see that they are distributed among the boys. Hoping you are all well, I am, yours truly,

Corp. H. V. Mitchell

Another letter from Verne was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 23, 1916:

PTE. VERNE MITCHELL IS ON THE FIRING LINE

First Time in Trenches is ‘Some Experience’

Mr. C. B. Monteith, of the Aylmer Express, has received the following interesting letter from Pte. Mitchell, a former member of the 91st Battalion, a former employee of the Express.

France, October 30, 1916

Dear Claude –

A few lines to let you know that I am perfectly O.K., and to tell you some of my experiences.  There are five of us in this billet where I am tonight, and we have some billet here I can tell you. We have been in the line and it is a great experience, believe me. Old Fritz has got everything to throw at us that they have on the maps; whiz-bangs, good night, I’ll bet it you ever heard one you would duck just like I did! They go something like this and I do believe are the fastest thing known to earth.  You hear a report, then whizz-bang, just like that. Speed, why lightning is slow. Then for desert he may throw over a trench mortar. These are very delicious and would make you run a mile to get out of sight. Then there are in Fritz’s repertoire, coal boxes, rum jars, fish tails, and a few more that I can’t mention just now.  I happened to be on a tower guard the other night over a railroad, back of our front line about 40 yards. We had sand bags built up and some sheets of heavy iron on top, with a little peek hole to see down the track. The dirty Hun at night fixes his machine guns and rifles back over our front line and into the supports in the hope that he may hit some on in the dark. We had a fellow on the guard who was short, fat and stuttered a little also. I can tell you he was a fine little fellow and we all like him very much. He was out from under the sheet iron and was looking over the top of the sand bags, which he could just reach by standing on this tip-toes.  Just then up went one of Fritz’s flares, which are awful bright, and Shorter was commenting on it when bur-r-r went a machine gun. Well funny, the boys are laughing about it yet. He went under that roof just like a flash and said to me, ‘Di-di-di-did you hear th-th-that?’  I sure did laugh to myself then, but after getting off guard I had a good one.

The Germans do not have everything their own way now because when he opens up with his battery, ours reply, five to every one. Our aeroplanes can sail over his lines any old time they choose and nobody disputes them. They do bring down one now and again with shrapnel, but that is just a lucky shot.  I had the pleasure of watching a 12-inch Howitzer battery in action since coming over here, and it is also very interesting. Standing behind the gun and watching at a point above you can see the shell for a long distance going through the air. You will not believe that, but it is the truth nevertheless.  Since being over here I saw one of the greatest bombardments ever known in the history of this old world. Something fearful and how anything can live in such an inferno I do not know. There is not much more to tell you tonight and as I am tired I will close for this time.  Hoping to hear from you again soon,

Pte. H. V. Mitchell, No. 123484, D. Coy, 21st Can. Batt., B.E.F.

P.S. Douglas Dunnett is right around here where I am somewhere, but I haven’t seen him yet.

Another letter to James Anger was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916:

PTE. H. V. MITCHELL WRITES HOME

France, Dec. 11th, 1916

Jas. L. Anger, Aylmer West, Ont.

Dear Jim – Received your letter O.K. and was certainly glad that you are well and that your business is going along the same as usual. You certainly wrote a very interesting letter and it caused quite a laugh, when I read it to my comrades here, especially the first part. Well Jim, I can say that I am quite well and getting along pretty well so far. The front line is a great experience and also very exciting at times. Wish you could be here or your partner, because I am sure you could write some great articles on this country. I can imagine a woman wheeling a barrow full of bread up the main street, also women helping to load empty barrels in carts. Another feature I have seen is the way the people stick together over here. They are more cordial than our people in Canada. When they meet on the street you hear the customary “bon jour” (good day) from nearly all of them. The Canadian boys also get used just the same. When you are on duty as I was the other night, a French lady came out and gave me a nice big bowl of hot coffee. And how nice it tasted, more so possibly, because it was given to me by a perfect stranger and in a strange land. Wish I could have a nice big bowl of that milk you used to peddle. Haven’t had a drink of milk since I left England. We had a bath this morning and I must tell you how we go about it. We parade by platoons up tot he Brigade baths. This is a building fitted up in some town back of the firing line. They made about one hundred showers in this building and have an abundance of good hot water and soap. You have your shower and go to a sort of counter and receive all clean underclothing and top shirt, also a pair of socks. We have one of these baths whenever it is possible, sometimes it is twelve days and sometimes eighteen. I know Jim, that my wife would think that awful, but it is the best we can possibly hope to do. I am glad my wife and kiddies are well and hope they may continue the same, because a Canadian soldier has enough on his mind out here and it would certainly make it much worse if there were something wrong at home.

The weather here just at present is ideal, not too cold for comfort as yet. Well Jim we all hope and pray that the war will soon be over and we can once again return to our loved ones in “Dear Old Canada”. They can have all their European countries, who want them, but just give me that little spot on John street south, and I will be contented for the next fifty years. How are the recruits coming? Are they thinking of compulsion over there? For my own part, I hope the men will see the need and come on over here and help us put the finishing touches on “Old Fritz”. All he needs now is a little extra push and over he goes.

Wish I could write you more, but as I have to go out pretty soon, I will have to bring this letter to a close. Putting all things in the hat, Jim, and tossing them around and are now on the winning side and we must stick her out until the finish. Hoping you and Mrs. Anger and the children are well, I remain, Your old friend, H. V. Mitchell.

A letter from Verne to his pastor was printed in the Aylmer Express, February 15, 1917:

WORLD WILL BE A LOT BETTER AFTER THIS WAR

Letter From Pte. H. V. Mitchell

Men Are Changed After They Have Been Face to Face With Death

Private H. V. Mitchell, formerly of the Express staff, some weeks ago wrote the following letter to his pastor here, Rev. T. Mitchell. Like so many other letters coming from the battle front, it shows that our brave and manly fellows have a different viewpoint of life and the hereafter, since facing death for the honor of their country. It reads:

Dear Pastor –

Your most welcome letter received, and although it was a long time reaching me, it came at a most appropriate time. We were on the line at the time, and as everything seemed to be going backwards, it made a fellow feel a little blue. But your letter and the splendid words you pointed out for me to read out of the dear old testament (which has been my friend many a time), I was cheered up a whole lot, and now that we are back in billets, I certainly must answer your letter first of all.  I am also very thankful that you look in and see my good wife and children occasionally. It makes me feel much better to know that somebody will see that they are well and getting along nicely.

Well, do you remember the text which you preached to our boys when we at your church in Aylmer, ‘Watch ye, stand fast in the faith; quit ye like me, be strong.’  You may rest assured that I willl follow that text wherever it may lead me, and will never flinch from my duty to God, to King, and to Country.

Don’t stint at all, in your letters to me about Christianity. I cannot read or hear too much of God’s word, and the more help I get will help me to keep on in the path which I am determined to follow. These words often ring in my ears when standing on the fire-step, ‘I will never leave thee nor forsake thee: I am the Redeemer, I will care for thee’. Splendid words, don’t you think?  I never fear about reading my testament, and you would be so surprised at the change that comes over our boys after they have been face to face with death. They never laugh at, nor make fun of God’s book or name when it is produced or mentioned. This will be a lot better world after this war is over.  Men are beginning to realize there is a God, and many are looking to Him every day. Sometimes I think that possibly I did wrong in leaving my wife, mother and children to come over here, but at other times, and more so now, something tells me even though I forfeit my life, that I am doing right.  It is no doubt hard for those at home, but still God knows best, and ‘His will be done’. Somebody had to do it, and why not I?  He died to save me, and my work over here is to try and save someone else from that crazy monarch’s clutches.

Hoping you may have a spare moment to write again soon, I will close.  Pray for us all and I know God will hear. From one whom you are helping on the narrow path,

V. Mitchell, (123484), 21st Batt., B.E.F., France

Another letter from Verne was published in the Aylmer Express, March 22, 1917:

THINKS ISSUE OF RUM IS NECESSARY

Given Strictly For Medicinal Purposes Pte. H. V. Mitchell Explains Why It is Needed

Many More Men Needed to Fill the Gaps
Strong Appeal for the Boys to Come Over and Help Finish the War

The Express has received the following letter from Pte. H. V. Mitchell, a former employee:

France, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 1917

Messrs. Barnecott & Monteith:

Dear Friends –

Not hearing from you for some time and having a few spare moments to my credit, I would like to write you a short letter, which I think may help some who are thinking of enlisting and coming over here to do their bit. I saw in a Canadian paper where a man who had been over here, doing his bit, was invalided home and after getting better was employed at a munition factory. He thought he would ask some of his fellow workers who had not enlisted to enlist, so he broached the subject to them. This is the answer he received, ‘Well they passed total prohibition in Ontario and took away our liberty, and as we are fighting for our liberty, and they take our beer away from us, whey we won’t fight’.  Those are not the exact words but they mean the same. Well I can’t believe that man was a true British subject. He is certainly an enemy and anyway to say, because he can’t get beer, and he calls booze liberty. God grant that his eyes may be opened and soon at that. If that is the liberty that these men are fighting and giving their lives, arms, legs, eyes, etc., for, why we had better be off for home and leave Germany with the baron. Of course some say, ‘Oh the soldiers get rum at the front and that is enough for them. They don’t care whether they get beer or not’. Let me explain what the rum is issued for. The first place for a medicine wholly and solely. That is one reason and that is reason enough. Sometimes we go through mud and water up to our knees and no place to dry our shoes and socks. Other times we are so tired we can hardly pull one foot in front of the other, but we have to go on with the work just the same. Then you hear a remark that hot coffee would serve the same purpose. I have tried both and as I am leading and have led a Christian life for some months, I can find no reason at all why rum should not be issued. Also coffee does not keep away sickness, and another thing, too much coffee is harmful. I wrote my mother, one of the best Christian women in your town, to the effect if she thought it was wrong to take rum. She said she was in no position to judge me and I would have to take it to God in prayer. I did and cannot yet feel that my conscience tells me to stop taking the rum. We are not fighting here for booze but for our homes, the business men and those who cannot come out here to help us here.

But there are lots of men in Canada today who should be here. We have an army of possibly 375,000 men. An expert figures one-tenth of the population of a country for a fighting force. Canada has a population of eight million, so one-tenth of that you can figure 800,000 men. That is what we should have now. Oh Canada has done well, but must do better. We must be kept up to strength at all times. We have casualties and the gaps have got to be filled up. Come on boys, all of you, and put the last touch on this war and let us all get back home. There are no exceptions now only those who are physically unfit.  All are needed and are needed now. I got word that your revival held in Aylmer by Hanley and Fisher was a decided success and many sought the Savior, and what is best of all, found His wonderful words to be true. ‘Come unto me all ye who are weary and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest’. In the past people have been getting too far away from God and the church and I believe one thing this war will bring about will be closer communion with God. When you get face to face with death like we are every day, you think of your past and present in a flash. ‘Be ready’ is the best motto. Time waits for no man when God calls. I hope and pray that ll who have taken the step to stand by God and the right will continue to do so no matter what may happen. Then we will have a better and purer town, province and country. Hope I have not taken up too much space in the good old Express, and hoping to hear from you soon, I remain,

Pte. H. V. Mitchell, No. 123484, Communication Ser., 21st Batt.

A letter from Verne to David Marshall, M.P., was printed in the Aylmer Express, August 9, 1917:

PRIVATE H. V. MITCHELL

In a Letter to D. Marshall, M.P., Tells of the Great Need for Reinforcements

Thinks Conscription the Only Way to Get Them

Through the courtesy of David Marshall, M.P., we are permitted to publish the following letter he recently received from Private H. V. Mitchell, who resigned his position on the Express staff to serve his country. It will give our readers an idea of how the boys in the trenches look upon the attitude some are taking in not advocating that reinforcements be sent to their aid.

France, July 4, 1917

Mr. David Marshall, M.P.

Dear Sir –
Your welcome letter on June 9th received and was pleased to hear from you. Yes, the Canadians are doing their share I guess, and will continue to do so as long as we have the men, but we must be kept up to full strength. Conscription seems to be the only way out of the difficulty. I often wonder if some of the young, single men of my own community ever stop to consider what this war means to us all. Do they know that it means “our liberty”, our right to live on an equal basis, and that the boys who are here would some day like to come back, if “they” would only just come and give us the lift. Do they realize that we have to undergo hardships and suffering, facing death many times, while the hearts of our loved ones at home ache with the thought that their husband, father, brother or sweetheart may never return to them again. But some may say, “Oh well, he was a fool for signing up. He knew he would have to go through it”. Yes, but if the homes of those same people were on fire, they would look to our volunteer fire department to put it out. Supposing the firemen would say “We are not going to risk our lives to save their property, let it burn”. There would be a great holler then, don’t you think? Elgin County, especially our own riding, I know has done well in the matter of recruiting, but they must do more. We have got to win, that’s all there is to it, or else go through life with not only the yoke of a Hun on our neck, but everlasting shame. And Quebec has certainly not done their duty, but should be brought to it. But they seem to think more of politics than they do of God or country. Sir Robert Borden is doing the right thing and I for one will stand by him if it comes to a vote. If I thought he was doing wrong I wouldn’t. He is the man of the hour for Canada. May God bless and help him to go on fulfilling his duty faithfully, all for Canada. With regards to Mrs. Marshall and yourself, I am,

Pte. H. V. Mitchell, Nov. 123484, Co. Sec. 21st Batt., Can’s. 

Another letter from Verne was printed in the Aylmer Express, February 14, 1918:

‘SOME GREAT SHOWS IN FRANCE’ WRITES PTE. H. V. MITCHELL

Mr. W. H. Starr, of this place, has received the following lines from Pte. Mitchell, who has been many months on the firing line.

France, Jan. 11th, 1918
Mr. W. Starr, Aylmer West, Ontario, Canada

Dear Will –
Your welcome letter of December 9th received and was very glad to hear from you again, and that you and Eva are well. I am looking anxiously for that parcel, Bill, because I know it will be a good one.  I am glad to know that George Ellis and Jack Parker are home safe. Saw George just once in France that I can remember. That was in October 1916, and his battalion was billeted in a little village, which we passed through.  Some accident at Halifax, all right, wasn’t it?

Say you should see some of the shows being put on over here. It would make you laugh, but considering there is a war on they do splendid work. The fad with these shows is the female impersonator. Of course the crowd is all men, so it takes the house, get me? They never go bust either, Bill, like the Guy Bros.

Yes, I will be glad when the great day comes and we ran “partee toute suite”. Some French comprhe. Will try and send you a little souvenir or two soon Bill. Thanking you for the parcels, and hoping to hear from you again soon. I am, your friend, Mitch.

Regards to Eva, please. Your kindness does help so much.  Pte. H. V. Mitchell, 123484, Comm. Sec. 21st Canadians, B.E.F., France.

Correspondence from Vern was referred to in the Aylmer Express, September 12, 1918:

Mrs. H. V. Mitchell has received a letter from her husband Corporal Mitchell, written from England, where he is enjoying a well-earned rest of a couple of weeks. He has been through the severe fighting of the past few weeks and has escaped un-wounded, although in need of a rest. He regrets the loss of the colonel of his regiment, who was shot through the lungs and died soon after. On account of his splendid services recently, he has been recommended for a commission.

Verne returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on February 2. His return from overseas was reported in the Aylmer Express, February 6, 1919, with a photograph and the following caption:

“Cadet H. Verne Mitchell, who arrived home Tuesday night after more than thirty months service. He reached St. John’s, N.B. on the Grampian last Sunday and arrived in London Tuesday. Cadet Mitchell has been on constant duty in France for many months as a runner, a most dangerous post, and came through it all without a scratch. Shortly before the armistice was signed he was recommended for a commission and was sent to England to study for his Lieutenancy, where he has been since, waiting to come home. He was a former member of the Express staff and enlisted with the 91st Battalion.”

Mr & Mrs Mitchell’s 50th anniversary was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 5, 1962:

COUPLE WED FIFTY YEARS

Mr and Mrs Harvey Verne Mitchell, 69 Railway Street, Woodstock, were married 50 years on Nov. 27.  They are former residents of Aylmer where they were married Nov. 27, 1912 at the Baptist Parsonage by the Rev. F. Welch.  Mrs. Mitchell is the former Laura Jean Wisson, daughter of Mr and Mrs William G. Wisson. Mr. Mitchell’s parents were Mr and Mrs J. F. Mitchell, who lived here.

After their marriage, Mr and Mrs Mitchell made their home here where Mr. Mitchell was employed at the Aylmer Express until 1921, when he moved to Woodstock and was employed by the Daily Sentinel Review until his retirement Jan. 28 this year.  Mr and Mrs Mitchell have four children; eight grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. On Sunday, Mr and Mrs Mitchell with their children were entertained at dinner at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Lawrence Wheatley, 234 Riddell Street. Mrs. Helen Watson, another daughter, assisted at the reception.  Many cards were received, also telegrams from the Prime Minister, Wallace Nesbitt, M.P., and Gordon Innes, M.P.P. for Oxford.

Verne died on July 15, 1982 in his 90th year.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 22, 1982:

VERNE MITCHELL

The funeral was held in Woodstock of Verne Mitchell of that city who died July 15 in his 90th year. He was born in Aylmer and was a veteran of the First Great War. He was one of the last survivors of the 91st Regiment and attended a reunion of that unit in St. Thomas this year. He was a brother of the late Mrs. Percy Crawford, the former Arlie Mitchell. He is survived by a daughter, Helen Desayette and a nephew, Morden Crawford, San Antonio, Texas.  Bev Tilly; Mrs. Peter Robinson (Dorothy Crawford); several great nieces and nephews. The funeral was held July 19 with burial in Memorial Cemetery, Woodstock.

James Arthur Mitchell

3137241

James Mitchell was born at Lyons in South Dorchester on December 30, 1896, the son of James Mitchell (1863-1940) & Elizabeth Ann McRae (1875-1944).  James Mitchell Sr. was born in Bayham, the son of James Mitchell & Marion Smith, and was a farmer in South Dorchester when he was married there on October 28, 1896 to Lizzie McRae, of South Dorchester, the daughter of Alex & Mary McRae.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

James Mitchell was a farmer living with his parents at R.R. #2 Springfield when he enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on September 19.

James died on October 18, 1933 at the age of 36 from diabetes. He was not married. He is buried in Aylmer cemetery, with a military monument marking his resting place with the following inscription:

3137241 Private James A. Mitchell 1st Depot Bat. W.O.  Reg. C.E.F.  18th October 1933

James’ obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 19, 1933:

JAMES ARTHUR MITCHELL DIES SUDDENLY

Popular Young Man of Lyons

James Arthur Mitchell, son of Mr and Mrs James Mitchell, of Lyons, died at the home of his parents, Wednesday morning in his 38th year. He had been ill for some months with diabetes, but the end came very suddenly, just after he had dressed and started to walk out of the house. He died before Dr. McLay, of Aylmer, could reach the house. Deceased was born at Lyons, and lived there all his life, where he was popular and leaves a host of friends. He was a member of Springfield Lodge, 289, A.F. & A.M., London Lodge of Perfection, 14 degrees, and London Rose Croix, 18 degrees; also a member of Hope Lodge, I.O.O.F., Harrietsville, and a veteran of the Great War.

Besides his parents, he is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Charles Moore, Springfield; Mrs. Clarence Dennis, Pontiac, Mich.; and Mrs. Melbourne Ashton, Kingsmill, Ont.  Also four nieces, Marilyn Moore, Springfield; Ilene and Eleanor Dennis, Pontiac; and Greta Ashton, Kingsmill.  At the time of going to press funeral arrangements had not been completed.

Morgan Milton Mitchell

3130121

Morgan Mitchell was born on April 24, 1895 at Calton in Bayham township, the son of Arthur George Mitchell (1859-1930) & Erena Mary Ribble (1864-1941). Arthur was the son of Simeon & Miranda Mitchell and was married on March 8, 1884 in Bayham to Erena Ribble, the daughter of Charles & Mary Ribble. They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Morgan was a farmer living at Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on December 12, 1917 in London. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on July 8.

He was living in Bayham when he was married on December 5, 1923 in Vienna to Ethel Upton Procunier (1888-1969).  Ethel was born in Hamilton, the daughter of John Upton & Annie Ellis, and was the widow of George Procunier. 

Morgan died in 1970 and is buried with his wife in Straffordville cemetery.

 

Mailon Eugene Mitts

3139228

Mailon Mitts was born on January 24, 1896 at Corinth, the son of Peter Davey Mitts (1863-1938) & Cerinda Pearson (1873-1961).  Peter was born in South Dorchester, the son of John & Fanny Mitts, and was a labourer living in Corinth when he was married on August 25, 1891 in Springfield to Cerinda Pearson, of Bayham, the daughter of Thomas & Cerinda Pearson.  They are buried in Richmond West cemetery.

Mailon was a farm labourer living at Corinth when he enlisted for service on June 24, 1918 in London.

He was living in Corinth when he was married on March 8, 1919 in Tillsonburg to Clara Leola Tait (1903-1956), of Walsingham, the daughter of Albert Tait & Nellie Hough.

Mailon died on March 4, 1977 and is buried with his wife in Kinglake Cemetery, Houghton Township. His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, March 4, 1977:

MAILON E. MITTS

Mailon E. Mitts of RR 5 Langton, passed away at Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Friday, March 4, 1977, in his 82nd year.  Born at Corinth, January 24, 1896, he was a son of Peter Mitts and the former Cerinda Pearson.  He was predeceased by his first wife, the former Clara Leota Tait.

Surviving are his second wife, the former Violet Shropshire; four daughters, Mrs. Maurice (Hazel) Dely of RR 2 Port Burwell; Mrs. Ivan (Mildred) Rohrer of Nestleton; Mrs. Wilfred (Helen) Graham of RR 1 Thedford; and Mrs. William (Ruby) Weston of Hampton; two sons, George Mitts of RR 5 Langton, and Stanley Mitts of RR 6 Tillsonburg; one brother, Russell Mitts of Corinth; and several grandchildren and great grandchildren.  He was predeceased by two sisters and one brother.

Resting at the H. A. Ostrander and Son Funeral Home where service will be held Monday, March 7 at 2 p.m. conducted by Rev. John Sider of Houghton Brethren in Christ Community Church, assisted by Rev. Edward Gilmore of Wainfleet.  Interment in Kinglake Cemetery. Memorial donations tot he Houghton Brethren in Christ Community Church would be appreciated by the family.

Charles Ingram Moe

210612 / 3025016

Charles Moe was born on April 22, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of James H. Moe (1860-1939) & Minerva House (1864-1943).  James was born in Bayham, the son of Henry & Sarah Moe, but was farming in Malahide when he was married there on December 24, 1884 to Minerva House, a resident and native of Malahide, and daughter of Mary House.  James & Minerva are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Charles was a farmer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 2, 1915 in Welland.  He had belonged to the 44th Regiment for three months.  This attestation paper gives his service number as 210612. 

Charles re-enlisted on June 4, 1917 in St. Catharines, while employed as a painter in Silver Creek, New York.  This attestation paper bears the service number 3025016.

While in England, Charles was married to Rosa M. Bateman in 1919 in Greater London. Charles returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 1.  His wife Rosa sailed a few months later from Southampton, England and arrived in Halifax on September 10.

They settled in Aylmer where a daughter was born in 1922.

There is a Charles Moe buried in Park Lawn Cemetery, Cambridge, who died on March 29, 1975.

(Henry) Harry Douglas Moe

164406

Harry Moe was born on May 22, 1894 in Aylmer,  the son of James H. Moe (1860-1939) & Minerva House (1864-1943).  James was born in Bayham, the son of Henry & Sarah Moe, but was farming in Malahide when he was married there on December 24, 1884 to Minerva House, a resident and native of Malahide, and daughter of Mary House.  James & Minerva are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Harry was a farmer, and enlisted for service on September 25, 1915 in Niagara. He names his next of kin as his mother, Minerva, of Aylmer.

Harry was married Laura Ward.  He died on September 29, 1954, and is buried in Mountview Cemetery, Cambridge (Galt).

William Thomas Moorcraft

3137271

William Moorcraft was born on October 18, 1895 in Liverpool, England, the son of William Moorcraft & Mary Quirk (1870-1933). They are found on the 1901 census in Liverpool, living at 7 Herbert Street, where William Sr. is a plumber’s labourer. They emigrated to Canada in 1906, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Norseman, and arriving in Halifax on May 25. They settled in Malahide where they appear on the 1911 census.  A daughter Elizabeth Ethel was born to them in Elgin County on June 19, 1906.  It appears that William & Mary returned to England.  

When William enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London, he lists his next of kin as Mrs. Mary Moorcraft, 70 Mill Road, Liverpool.  William was a farmer living at Corinth.  No record of William Moorcraft Sr.’s death can be found in Ontario records, so if they did return to England, Mary returned to Canada after 1918.  A marriage record was found for her on May 21, 1921 in Aylmer to John Anderson, a widower living in Aylmer, but a native of Liverpool. Mary was also a widow, living in Aylmer, the daughter of James Quirk & Joanne Phillips.  John Anderson & Mary are buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin.

William Moorcraft died on September 16, 1923 in Victoria Hospital, London from a hemorrhage following a gunshot wound in the chest. He is buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin but his name is not found on his mother and step-father’s monument.

Kenneth Harold Moore

189773

Kenneth Moore was born on October 25, 1898 on the South Dorchester- Dereham Township townline, the son of James Lewis Moore (1886-1946) & Mabel Ethel Newell (1869-1966).  They were married on January 1, 1886 in Malahide.  James Lewis Moore  was the son of William Allan Moore & Ellen Nesbitt.  Mabel Newell was the daughter of Andrew Newell & Eliza Hastings.  James & Mabel and several of their children are buried in Springfield cemetery.

Kenneth’s brother, Gordon Earl Moore, was killed in action on May 4, 1917.

Kenneth was a butcher living in Springfield when he enlisted for service on January 3, 1916 in St. Thomas with the 91st Battalion.  His attestation paper has a notation that he was invalided to Canada for further medical treatment. He served with the 38th Battalion in France and was wounded at the Somme.

An article about Kenneth and his brother Gordon being wounded appeared in the St. Thomas Daily Times, December 18, 1916:

TWO BROTHERS ARE WOUNDED IN FRANCE

Gordon and Kenneth Moore In Casualty List

Springfield, Dec. 12: Miss Maude Moore received a letter yesterday from her brother Gordon who was wounded Nov. 28, dated Nov. 21, informing her that while he was assisting to carry a wounded officer into the hospital his brother Kenneth was brought in on a stretcher suffering from a bullet wound in the thigh. He also stated that after his wound was dressed, he was taken to England. The family had had no intimation of the accident till the letter arrived. Kenneth was little more than a boy, and as a pupil of the school was a general favorite. Mr and Mrs Moore and family have the sympathy of all in their trouble. A cable was sent Saturday to ascertain the exact condition of Gordon Moore but as yet no reply has come.

Kenneth was not married, and died on January 20, 1966.  He is buried in Springfield cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 26, 1966:

KENNETH MOORE

Springfield – Service was held here Saturday afternoon at the Ross Shaw Funeral Home for Kenneth Moore of Springfield who died Thursday night at his home. The Rev. H. C. Macdougall of St. John’s United Church officiated. Interment was in Springfield cemetery. Pallbearers were Fred Shively, Harold Vincent, Harold Burgess, Fred Schultz, Frank Walker and Jack Hodgson.  The floral tributes were carried by Clifford Summerhayes, Al White, Arthur Jones, Bert Sims, Bert Killough, William Putnam and George Lewis. Friends and relatives attended from Detroit, Windsor, London, Wingham, Toronto, Aylmer, Springfield and community.  Mr. Moore, who died suddenly, was 67.  He was the son of Mrs. Mabel (Newell) Moore and the late James L. Moore.  He was born at the Dereham-South Dorchester town line.  He was postmaster in Springfield for 17 years and a member of the Springfield Lodge No. 259 A.F. and A.M., Col. Talbot Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion, Aylmer, and an adherent of St. John’s United Church, Springfield. Surviving besides his mother are two sisters, Mrs. Clara Ferris, Springfield; and Mrs. Annie Wilcox, Union; two brothers Newell Moore of Springfield, and Burnice, of Windsor.

 

Samuel Camden Moore

3134418

Samuel Moore was born on September 5, 1890 at Corinth in Bayham, the son of Edward Moore (1856-1906) & Mary Malissa Teal (1864-1944).  Edward was born in Bayham, the son of Alexander & Elizabeth Moore, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on May 8, 1881 in Fenwick, Pelham Twsp., Welland County to Mary Teal, a native of Crowland, daughter of Joseph & Mary S. Teal.  Edward died while living in Bayham, and his widow returned to Welland County.

Samuel Moore was a farmer living at R.R. #4 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 15, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mary, of Welland.

Samuel was a mechanic living in Port Burwell when he was married there on March 13, 1922 to Vida McKibbin, a native of Langton also living in Port Burwell, daughter of Alvin McKibbin & Junie Marshall.

No further information is known.

 

Walter Albert Moore

2627422

Walter Moore was born on May 21, 1882 in Bayham, the son of Edward Moore (1856-1906) & Mary Malissa Teal (1864-1944).  Edward was born in Bayham, the son of Alexander & Elizabeth Moore, and was farming there when he was married on May 8, 1881 in Fenwick, Pelham Township, to Mary Teal, of Crowland Township, the daughter of Joseph & Mary S. Teal. Edward died while living in Bayham, and his widow returned to Welland County. 

Walter was living at 49 Victoria Road, Walkerville in Sandwich Township, Essex County, working as a draftsman when he enlisted for service on August 21, 1918 in London. He enlisted with the Canadian Engineers.

Walter emigrated to the United States where he is found on the 1930 census in Passaic, New Jersey, employed as a mechanical engineer for a rubber company.  He was married in Welland on August 27, 1930 to Marie Elizabeth Dair, of Welland, daughter of David Dair. Walter returned to Passaic, New Jersey with his wife. He died in 1932.

Charles Smith Morin

189137 / 123532

The name “Charles S. Morrin” appears in a list of men who enlisted at Aylmer, printed in the Aylmer Sun, June 1, 1916. It states he enlisted with the 91st Battalion.

An attestation paper was found for Charles Smith Morin, #189137 [this regimental number crossed out and replaced with # 123532].  He was born on April 30, 1894 in Gillane, Scotland and was a conductor.  He was single, and names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Jane Morin, of Gillane, Haddingtonshire, Scotland.  He enlisted in Aylmer on September 18, 1915.

Passenger lists to Canada show Charles and his family returning to Canada on May 25, 1929, arriving in Montreal from Greenock, Scotland.  The record indicates that Charles had lived at Belmont between 1915 and 1926.  Accompanying him is his wife Agnes, who also resided at Belmont between 1919 and 1926; and children Edith J., Joyce H., Charles P., and Violet F.  Edith and Violet were born in Glasgow, but Joyce and Charles were born in Wales.  From this record, it would appear that Charles returned to Canada in 1919 with his bride, but returned to Scotland in 1926.

The above passenger list gives Charles’ occupation as a professional golfer, and his destination is his employer,  Dunlop Sports Company in Montreal.  His nearest relative in the country from which he came is his mother, Mrs. J. Morrin, of 24 Middleshot Road, Gullane, East Lothian, Scotland. No further information is known.

Roy Mahlon Morris

3134267Roy Morri

Roy Mahlon Morris was born on April 22, 1895 in Yarmouth Township, the son of Minnard Morris (1850-1920) & Sarah Ann Boughner (1851-1914).  Minnard was born in Oxford County, the son of David & Maria Morris, and was a labourer living in Yarmouth when he was married there on December 7, 1881 to Sarah Boughner, of Yarmouth, the daughter of Mahlon Boughner & Susannah Johnson.  Minnard later worked as a marble cutter, and the family is found on the 1911 census in Aylmer.  Following Sarah’s death in 1915, Minnard moved to Lydden, Saskatchewan about 1915. He died in 1920 in Tisdale, Saskatchewan.   Minnard & Sarah are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Roy’s address was Box 28, Ridgetown, Ontario when he enlisted for service on May 31, 1918 in London. He was a druggist, and was not married.  He names his next of kin as his father, Minnard, of Lydden, Saskatchewan.

Roy returned from overseas in 1919, sailing from Hong Kong and arriving in Vancouver on May 30.  He resumed his occupation as a druggist, and was living in Tisdale, Saskatchewan when he was married on January 1, 1920 in Aylmer to Virginia May Stevenson (Feb. 21, 1895-Mar. 20, 1987), a native of Preston, Minnesota, living in Aylmer employed as a telegraph operator, daughter of William Stevenson & Clara Hagan. 

Roy died on November 9, 1982 and is buried with his wife and parents in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, November 9, 1982:

ROY MORRIS

Roy Morris, of 13 St. George Street, Aylmer, passed away at the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1982 in his 87th year.  Mr. Morris was the son of Mr and Mrs Mahlon Morris and was a druggist who lived most of his life in Aylmer and worked at Caughell and Company for many years before operating his own drug store and telegraph office. He was a member of St. Paul’s United Church where he taught Sunday School for many years. He is also the oldest living member of the Col. Talbot Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Aylmer and a member of Malahide Masonic Lodge No. 140 A.F. and A.M.

He is survived by his wife, Virginia (Stevenson); one son, Dr. R. W. Morris of London; a daughter, Mrs. Stuart (Barbara) Busby of London; seven grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. A brother, Fred, passed away previously.

Mr. Morris is resting at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home where visitation will be held Wednesday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., and where a private family service will be conducted Thursday at 2 p.m., with Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church officiating. Interment will be in Aylmer Cemetery.

The Aylmer Express of November 10, 1982 also carried this obituary:

ROY MORRIS WAS LAST LOCAL LEGION CHARTER MEMBER

Roy Morris, 86, of 13 St. George Street, Aylmer, a retired druggist and the last charter member of Col. Talbot Branch 81 Royal Canadian Legion, died Tuesday, November 9, 1982 in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital.  He lived most of his life in Aylmer. At one time he worked for the former Caughell and Company for many years and then operated Morris Drug Store and the telegraph office in Aylmer.

Mr. Morris was a member of St. Paul’s United Church where he taught Sunday School for many years. He was also a member of Malahide Masonic Lodge No. 140 A.F. & A.M.

He is survived by his wife, the former Virginia Stevenson, a daughter Mrs. Stuart (Barbara) Busby and a son Dr. R. W. Morris, both of London, seven grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.  He was predeceased by a brother Fred.

A private funeral will be conducted from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home by the Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church on Thursday, November 11 at 2 p.m. Burial will be in Aylmer Cemetery. Six Legion members will be pallbearers. Visitation is today, Wednesday, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Gordon Bruce Morse

190081  Bruce Morse

Bruce Morse was born on September 7, 1896 at Richmond, the son of Hiram K. Morse (1873-1941) & Eliza Kennedy (1873-1915).  Hiram was born in Drummondville, the son of William & Eliza Jane Morse, and was a painter living in Richmond when he was married on December 25, 1874 in Vienna to Eliza Kennedy, of Bayham, the daughter of William & Martha Ann Kennedy.  They are buried in Richmond West cemetery.

Bruce was a painter living in Bayham when he enlisted for service on March 8, 1916 in St. Thomas.

A poem written by Bruce was printed in the Aylmer Express, July 12, 1917:

WHY I ENLISTED

The following was composed by Pte. Bruce Morse, of the 91st Battalion, now Somewhere in France, and sent to a friend in Richmond, Ont. Pte. Morse is a nephew of the Misses Morse, of Aylmer:

You ask me why I enlisted, and why did I go to the war?

Just listen – I’ll tell you a story, perhaps you have heard it before.

I ain’t no bloomin’ hero, and don’t want any thanks

I’m just a paltry private, doing my bit in the ranks.

I was just a country bumpkin, making my way on the land,

And when the war was started, I decided to lend a hand.

I heard of the German in Belgium, and the horrible deeds he had done,

My blood ran cold with horror, at what he called great fun.

The way he treated the mothers, and the little children, too,

Made me join the colors, determined to see it through.

For it’s up to all us Britons, no matter where we may be, 

To stand up shoulder to shoulder, until little Belgium is free.

There are lads who have crossed the ocean, from Australia and Canada, too.

To fight beside the Tommies, determined to see it all through –

Till victory comes to our army, and the Union Jack is unfurled,

Till the Kaiser learns he is beaten, and finds he cannot rule the world.

Then I pull of my khaki, and return to my home o’er the sea;

I’ll consider my duty accomplished, and know that my conscience is free.

But if I should fall in battle, and never more cross o’er the foam

I’ll still thank God I enlisted, and helped to protect my old home.

Bruce was awarded the Military Medal as reported in a newspaper clipping dated January 31, 1918: “Pte. B. G. Morse, son of H. K. Morse, of Richmond, Ont., who went overseas with the 90th [sic – should be 91st] has been awarded the Military Medal for his good work in France. He was admitted to the Canadian Hospital, Woodcote Park, Epsom, England, on Nov. 24, 1917, suffering from the effects of being gassed caused by the explosion of a shell. He was awarded the medal on recommendation of his lieutenant in France. He will go to England to be decorated before the King”.

Bruce returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on January 25. He was married on October 28, 1919 in Aylmer to Ida Evelina Cartwright (1894-1985), of Bayham, the daughter of George Warren Cartwright & Susan Willson.

Bruce died on January 17, 1986, and is buried with wife in Richmond West cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 22, 1986:

BRUCE MORSE

Bruce Morse, 89, died at Elgin Manor on Friday, January 17, 1986.  He was born in Bayham Township on September 7, 1896, son of the late Hiram and Eliza (Kennedy) Morse. He was a veteran of the First Great War.

Mr. Morse had been a painter and lived most of his life in Richmond. He was a member of Richmond United Church.  He was predeceased by his wife Ida (Cartwright) Morse.

He is survived by sons Leo of Aylmer, and Eugene (Jiggs) of RR 3 Tillsonburg, daughters Mrs. Madeline (Joe) Dreher of RR 3 Delhi, and Mrs. Olive (Charles) Grass of RR 1 Aylmer; brother John Morse of Richmond; 12 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren.

Pastor Norman Hare of Richmond United Church conducted the funeral service from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer, on Monday, January 20, 1986. Mr. Morse’s burial followed in Richmond Cemetery.

Frederick Mortimer

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Frederick Mortimer was born on March 23, 1889 in Bethnal Green, London, England, the son of George Mortimer & Elizabeth Treleaven.  The family is found on the 1901 England census living at 23 Coventry Street, Bethnal Green, London. George & Elizabeth are living with her parents, Richard & Eliza Treleaven.  Other children in the family besides Frederick were: Elizabeth, 10; John, 6; Florence, 3, and Ada, 3 months.

Frederick emigrated to Canada with a party from Dr. Barnardo’s Home.  The “Home Children” immigration records show an F. Mortimer, age 12, leaving Liverpool on July 21, 1904 on the ship Southwark, arriving in Quebec on July 31, 1904. He is found on the 1911 census in South Dorchester, living with Jesse & Etta Shively. 

Frederick was farming in Springfield when he enlisted for service on January 7, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his father, George Mortimer of 45 Bethnal Green, London, England.

Frederick was married on March 23, 1929 to Rosa Moore (1887-1965) of Springfield.

He died on October 12, 1958 in his 74th year and is buried with his wife in Springfield cemetery.

Frederick’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 16, 1958:

MORTIMER FUNERAL HELD

Springfield – Well known throughout the Springfield area, Frederick Mortimer died Sunday, Oct. 12 in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital in his 70th [sic] year. He had been ill for some time. Rev. George Shields of St. John’s United Church, Springfield, conducted the service Tuesday afternoon in the Ross Shaw Funeral Home. Fred Shively sang “Breathe on Me Breath of God”, accompanied by Mrs. Clifford Hiepleh.  Pallbearers were Harold Strong, Fred Schultz, Morgan Shively, Oswald Allen, Robert Charlton, Jack Wray, and the floral tributes were borne by James Barker, Byron McClintock, R. B. McKenney, Edward Rule.  Interment was made in the Springfield Cemetery.

Mr. Mortimer was born in London, England and as a boy of 15 years came to the Springfield area to work on the farm of the late Jesse Shively.  He came out under the auspices of the Bernardo Home.  Later he became an employee of the New York Central Railroad track and maintenance division for some 29 years.  He was a member of St. John’s United Church, Springfield. Surviving are his wife, the former Rosa Moore of St. Thomas.

George Livingstone Mortin

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George Mortin was born on April 7, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of Evans Mortin (1873-1963) & Elizabeth Harriet Livingstone (1875-1956), who were married in June 1896. Evans was born in Orwell, the son of George Mortin & Hannah Swindells.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Duncan Livingstone & Mary Clark.  Evans operated a bakery in Aylmer.  By 1901, they had moved to Plympton Township where they farmed.  They then moved to Saskatchewan about 1905, and are found on the 1911 census in Strassburg.  Evans & Elizabeth both died in Regina, Saskatchewan.

George was a clerk living in Dilke, Saskatchewan when he enlisted for service on January 25, 1917 in Regina.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Elizabeth, also of Dilke.

George was a teacher living in Dilke, Saskatchewan when he was married in St. Thomas on August 3, 1921 to Evelyn Stephens (1900-1993), daughter of John T. Stephens & Mary Rose.

They lived in St. Thomas and later in Dutton.

He died on January 24, 1973 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and is buried with his wife in Fairview Cemetery, Dutton. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, January 25, 1973:

MORTIN – At the Broward Community Hospital, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Wednesday, January 24, 1973, George L. Mortin, formerly of Dutton, in his 78th year; husband of the former Evelyn Stephens; father of George Jr., Jack and Donald, all of Toronto; and Murray, of Miami; brother of Ernest of Bethune, Saskatchewan; Jack and Donald of Regina; Kenneth of Detroit; and Mrs. Evelyn Miller of Manson, Washington. Resting at the Cyril J. Beill Funeral Home, Dutton, after 12 noon Friday, January 26. Funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, Dutton, Saturday, January 27 at 2 p.m., with Rev. Alexander Clements officiating. Interment in Fairvew Cemetery.

Wallace Hanley Moss

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Wallace Moss was born on July 18, 1896 in Nissouri Township, Middlesex County, the son of William P. Moss & Emeline Switzer.  William was the son of Henry & Mary Moss, and was living in Nissouri Township when he was married on February 5, 1891 in Woodham, Perth County to Emeline Switzer, of Blanshard Township, Perth County, daughter of Henry A. & Emma Switzer.  William & Emeline are buried in St. Marys Cemetery, St. Marys, Ontario.

Wallace was a farmer working with J. M. Gillott at R. R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 18, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his father, William Moss, of Thorndale.

Wallace became a Methodist minister and moved to Alberta. He died about 1988 at the age of 92.  His obituary, from an undated newspaper clipping, follows:

UNITED CHURCH PASTOR SERVED ALBERTANS WELL

A pastor who pioneered many United Church congregations in Alberta died recently at the age of 92. Rev. Wallace H. Moss was born on the family farm near London, Ont., and graduated from Victoria College in Toronto in 1922 with a masters of arts and bachelor of divinity degrees.  He was ordained in the Methodist church in 1922 and served two charges in Ontario before moving west in 1926 to serve with the newly established United Church of Canada.  He served charges in Burdett, Hythe, Westlock, Drumheller, Olds, Nanton, and two charges in Edmonton, Westminster-Chalmers and St. Andrews. He spent the Depression years in the Peace River country, often holding service in log churches and schools, community halls and homes. At the 50th anniversary of his ordination, he recalled his gratitude for the “eternal gospel, as expressed through people and Jesus Christ”.  While it has been challenged and sometimes manipulated, “the darkness has never put out the light”, he said.  He is survived by Marjorie, his wife of 66 years, and daughter, Aileen Eno of Drumheller; two sons, Harold of Tottenham, Ont., and Cedric of St. Albert; eight grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. 

Clifford William Mossey

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Clifford Mossey was born on January 11, 1892 in North Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, the son of William John Mossey (1865-1943) & Sarah Ann Godby (1866-1937).  William was born at Luton, the son of George & Ann Mossey and was a farmer in Walsingham when he was married on March 19, 1890 in Malahide to Sarah Godby, of Walsingham, the daughter of Robert & Sarah A. Godby.  They later lived at Kingsmill and are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Clifford was a school teacher living at Kingsmill when he enlisted for service on April 29, 1916 in Guelph.  He belonged to the 25th Regiment in Elgin County. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 18.

Clifford moved to Pontiac, Michigan about 1921 where he is found on the 1930 census with his wife Wave Mossey (1894-1972).  He was employed as a stock keeper in an auto plant.  His date of death cannot be found.

Richard Percy Moyes

1039313  Percy Moyes

The name “Percy Moyer” appears on a Springfield Honour Roll. There are three attestation papers bearing the name “Percy Moyer”, but none have an Elgin county connection.  It is possible that the above name on the Springfield Roll of Honor is in error and actually refers to Richard Percy Moyes.

Richard Percy Moyes was born on November 16, 1887 in Norwich, Norfolk, England, the son of George Moyes (1851-1894) & Emily Spooner.  

Percy emigrated to Canada about 1900 and first settled in the Canadian West where he is found on the 1901 census in Moffat, East Assiniboia, “North West Territories” (later part of Saskatchewan). The census gives his name as “Richard Moyes”, born Nov. 12, 1887 in England, and an emigration year of 1900.  He is working as a farm labourer. His brother George Richard Moyes (1885-1959, buried in Springfield cemetery) also emigrated to Canada about 1904. They both later moved to the Springfield area.

Richard Percy Moyes cannot be found on the 1911 census, but by 1916 had moved to Springfield. He was a labourer giving his address as Box 514 Springfield, Ontario when he enlisted for service on August 7, 1916 in London. He joined the 239th Battalion C.E.F., Railway Construction Corps.  He names his next of kin as his brother George of Springfield. He served with the 3rd Battalion Canadian Railway Troops in France.  He was discharged in March 1919.

He returned from overseas on March 1, 1919, arriving in Halifax. Mention is made of his return in the Aylmer Express, March 13, 1919 under the headline “Another Royal Welcome to Springfield Heroes” – “A very enjoyable evening was spent on Monday at the Baptist church, in honor of one of its returning heroes, Pte. Moyer. A light lunch was served, after which speeches were made by returned men and others”. Despite his surname being given as “Moyer” in the newspaper, a passenger list records him as “Spr. R. P. Moyes” with the service number 1039313.

Percy Moyes returned to England, probably in 1920, and was married that year to Iva (Ivy)Wright (1896-1964), a native of Norwich, Norfolk, England.  They sailed back to Canada on the Empress of France, and arrived in Quebec on October 27, 1920. 

He died on November 30, 1955 and is buried with his wife in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, November 30, 1955:

PERCY MOYES ILL 4 MONTHS

The death of a well known New York Central employee, Richard Percy Moyes, of 17 Jonas Street, occurred on Wednesday morning, at the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital. Mr. Moyes had been ill four months.

Mr. Moyes was a son of the late Mr and Mrs George Richard Moyes and was born in Norwich, England on Nov. 16, 1887. He came to Canada 57 years ago and settled first in the Canadian West, coming to St. Thomas in 1920 after three years’ service in France with the Canadian Army Railway troops in World War I.  Mr. Moyes was a member of St. John’s Anglican Church.

Surviving are Mr. Moyes’ wife, the former Ivy Wright; two daughters, Mrs. Marvin (Kathleen) House, Fingal, and Mrs. James (Eleanor) Miller, RR 4 St. Thomas; a brother George Moyes, 2 Verna Street; two brothers and two sisters in England. Steven House of Fingal is a grandson. Richard Spooner, Barnes Street, and Robert Spooner, Forest avenue, are cousins. There are also a number of nieces and nephews.

The remains are resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home, where the funeral service on Friday at two p.m. will be conducted by Rev. R. W. Lane, of St. John’s Anglican Church. Interment will be made in Elmdale Memorial Park. 

Arthur Muller

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Arthur Muller was born on March 23, 1883 in New York State.  Very little information can be found on him, but when he enlisted for service on July 8, 1918 in London, he gives his address as Corinth where he was a farmer.  He names his next of kin as Nelson Anger, a friend, of Corinth.

No further information is known.

 

Archibald Gladstone Naismith

107355 / 107719 / 2475

Archibald Naismith was born on May 19, 1882 in Exeter, Ontario, the son of Dr. Archibald David Naismith (1852-1944) & Janet Lamond (1860-1935).  Archibald was born in Glasgow, Scotland, the son of Archibald & Mary Naismith, and was a school teacher living in Hibbert Township, Perth County when he was married on September 3, 1878 in Exeter to Janet Lamond, of Hibbert, the daughter of Malcolm & Sarah Lamond.  Archibald became a medical doctor and moved to Milverton, Ontario where the family appears on the 1901 census.  They later moved to Bayham Township, where Dr. Naismith and his wife appear on the 1911 census.  Dr. & Mrs. Naismith are buried in Straffordville Cemetery.

Archibald Gladstone Naismith also became a medical doctor, and enlisted for service in Vancouver on December 4, 1914 with the 2nd Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles.  He belonged to the 28th Perth Infantry.  The three service numbers given above all appear on his attestation paper, with the first two being crossed out.

Dr. Naismith is mentioned in The British Medical Journal, August 4, 1917, listing honors: “Temporary Captain Archibald Gladstone Naismith, M.B., R.A.M.C., when supervising the erection of an A.D.S., he was knocked down and stunned by a shell which wounded most of his party. On recovery, he at once attended to the wounded, and remained until this was completed”.

Following the war, Dr. Naismith moved to British Columbia, where he died on November 17, 1971 in Nanaimo.

Earl Aubrey Howland Neff

Earl Neff was born on August 11, 1886 in Springfield, the son of  John Alexander Neff (1859-1935) & Martha McKenney(1861-1949).  John Neff was born in South Dorchester, the son of Peter James Neff & Elisabeth Trowbridge, and was a public school teacher in South Dorchester when he was married there on February 24, 1881 to Martha McKenney, also of South Dorchester, the daughter of Featherstone & Jane McKenney.  John Neff later became a medical doctor, practicing in Springfield and Ingersoll before moving to Edmonton and Vancouver. John & Martha died in Victoria, B.C., and are buried in Royal Oak Cemetery.

Earl also became a physician and enlisted for service on September 23, 1914 at Valcartier.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Martha Neff, of Suite 2, Empire Block, Edmonton.  He was made a Lieutenant, and had served in the A.M.C. in Toronto.

Dr. Earl Neff died on October 22, 1942 in Nicosia, Cyprus.

Er Neff

3131313

Er Neff was born on March 29, 1895 at Corinth, the son of Jacob William Neff (1868-1917) & Susan Jane Noel (1874-1948).  Jacob was born in South Dorchester, the son of Cornelius Neff & Catherine Best, and was a farmer living in Bayham when he was married on December 23, 1890 in Springfield to Susan Noel, of South Dorchester, daughter of John Noel & Caroline Neff.  They are buried in Springfield cemetery.

Er was a farmer living at Corinth when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1918 in London.

He was married on December 24, 1919 in Corinth to Flossie May Pearson (1896-1979), a native of Springfield living in Ostrander, the daughter of Christopher Pearson & Nancy Williams. Er & Flossie were divorced in 1943, and she was remarried to Floyd Elgin Orr. Flossie is buried in Richmond West Cemetery.

Er Neff was remarried to Edna Scott Smith (1899-1965).  He died on December 17, 1975 and is buried in Strathroy Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Strathroy Age Dispatch, December 23, 1975:

ER NEFF

Er Neff died following a lengthy illness at Victoria Hospital in London on Wednesday, December 17, 1975. He lived at 230 Victoria Street, London, and was 80 years of age.

He was the husband of the late Edna Scott, and the son of the late Jacob and Susan (Knoles) Neff.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Floyd (Gladys) Livingstone, R.R. 1 Delhi; and Mrs. Lorne (Irene) Grenier, of Richmond Hill; five grandchildren, three great grandchildren, and three sisters, Mrs. Merritt (Eva) Howey; Mrs. George (Olive) Rice, both of Tillsonburg; and Mrs. Harry (Ethel) Breeze of Stoney Creek. He was predeceased by two brothers, Orr Neff, and Ova Neff, and two sisters, Mrs. Dave Millard and Miss Minnie Neff.

Funeral services were held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Friday, December 19 at 2:00 p.m. under the direction of Reverend John Barrett. Pallbearers were Jim and Ted Pearson, Ron Neff, Arthur Breeze, Ron Hope and Gerald Pearson. 

Interment was in Strathroy Cemetery.

 

William Robert Nelson

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William R. Nelson was born on November 2, 1886 in Keppel Township, Grey County, near Owen Sound, the son of Robert Nelson & Martha Belford.

He was employed as a chair maker and was living in Chesley, Ontario when he enlisted for service with the 160th Battalion in Chesley.  He names his next of kin as his father, Robert Nelson of 563 14th Street West, Owen Sound.

It is not known if William ever lived in the Aylmer area, but he is buried in Aylmer cemetery beside his sister, Elizabeth Levina (1890-1953) and her husband Sloan Beresford McConnell (1890-1956), with a military marker bearing the following inscription:

 “William R. Nelson Private 47th Battn C.E.F.  3 Feb 1959 age 72″

William’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, February 12, 1959:

KIN OF AYLMER MEN IS BURIED

William Robert Nelson, who died in Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto Tuesday morning of last week, was laid to rest in the family plot in Aylmer Cemetery, Thursday. Service was held in the Hughson Funeral Home and was conducted by the Rev. Ronald Matthewman, rector of Trinity Anglican Church and padre of Colonel Talbot Branch 81 of the Canadian Legion.

Pallbearers were nephews, Jack McConnell, Nelson McConnell, Sloan McConnell, Wallace McConnell and John McDonald.

Mr. Nelson was born in Owen Sound 72 years ago, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Robert Nelson. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and served in the armed forces overseas during World War 1.

Surviving are a sister, Mrs. Willard of Utica, Mich., and several nieces and nephews.

William Arthur Nevill

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William Nevill was born on June 10, 1888 in Straffordville, the son of John Nevill (1852-1920) & Alvira Hodgkin (1862-1956).  John was born in Bayham, the son of Silas & Ann Nevill and was living there when he was married on March 24, 1877 to Alvira Hodgkin, also of Bayham, the daughter of Eli & Lucy Ann Hodgkin.  They are buried in Straffordville Cemetery.

William was a farmer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on May 10, 1918 in London.  He had served three years in the Norfolk Rifles militia.

William died on February 16, 1969 and is buried in Straffordville Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, February 19, 1969:

WILLIAM NEVILL

William Nevill, of 123 St. Andrew’s Street, Aylmer, died Sunday at his home after a lengthy illness.  He was 80.  Mr. Nevill was born in Straffordville and lived in Aylmer for the past 40 years.  He was a member of the Jehovah Witnesses Church.  He was the son of the late Mr and Mrs John Nevill.

Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Camby (Clara) Kennedy and Mrs. Jack (Alice) Silverthorn, both of 123 St. Andrew’s Street; several nieces and nephews.

Mr. Albert Crooker of the Jehovah Witnesses conducted the service Tuesday afternoon at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home.  Mrs. James Wright played the piano.

The pallbearers were Clifford Brandow, Stanley Moore, Harold Moore, Donald Hetherington, Kenneth Lampman and Alfred Nevill.  Interment was in Straffordville Cemetery.   Relatives and friends attended from Belgrave, Parkhill, London, Creemore, Straffordville, Eden, Linwood, Aylmer and district.

Norman Scanlan Neville

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Norman Neville was born on September 4, 1886 in Bayham, the son of Thomas James Neville (1849-1922) & Charlotte Scanlan (1859-1929).  Thomas was born in Stamford Township, the son of Thomas J. & Mary M. Neville, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on March 27, 1878 in Aylmer to Charlotte Scanlan, also of Bayham, the daughter of William & Mary Scanlan.  They are buried in Dobbie Cemetery, Bayham.

Norman was a working as a baker when he enlisted for service on December 9, 1914 in Toronto.  He names his next of kin as T. J. Neville, of Dorchester.  He enlisted with the 2nd Field Battery.

Following the war, he was married to Mary A. Hadden (1878-1965), and moved to London. He died on January 16, 1953 and is buried with his wife in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, January 17, 1953:

NEVILLE – At his late residence, 558 Colborne street, on Friday, January 16, 1953, Norman S., beloved husband of Mary Hadden Neville, in his 67th year. Dear father of Mrs. Dominic Sherlock (Hilda), Cleveland, Ohio, and Wendell Smith, of St Thomas; grandfather of Lorraine Mulcahy, Toledo, Ohio; and Audrey Smith, St. Thomas. Dear brother of Mrs. Cora Kerr, Strahtburg, Alta; Mrs. Arthur Little (Hildred), Embro; and Mrs. Norman Elwin (Lorraine), this city.  Funeral service in George E. Logan and Sons Funeral Chapel on Monday, January 19 at 2:30 p.m. Interment in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

Percy New

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Percy New was born on June 23, 1888 in Edmonton, Middlesex, (London), England, the son of George New & Mary Foster. The family is found on the 1891 England census at 12 Claremont Street, Edmonton, Middlesex.  George is not listed with them, but a George J. New, age 45, is enumerated as a patient in the Tottenham, Middlesex hospital, born in Portsmouth, Hampshire. A George James New & Mary Foster were married in 1871 in Portsea Island District, Hampshire.

By the 1901 census, Percy New is found living at St. Joseph & St. Anne Orphanage in Farnborough, Kent, age 11.   There is record of a Percy New, age 12, emigrating to Canada with a party of Dr. Barnardo’s “boys”, leaving Liverpool on March 21, 1901 on the ship Tunisian.  

Percy New is also found on the 1901 census in Malahide, born June 23, 1888 in England, a farm helper living with Robert & Lizzie Andrews.  On the 1911 Malahide township census, he is a labourer, born June 1888 in England, emigrated 1901, living with Edward & Mary Caven.

Percy moved to Detroit where he was living at 53 Spring Street, and working as a machinist when he enlisted for service with the 63rd Battery on March 30, 1917 in Amherstburg.  He names his next of kin as a sister, Mrs. S. Proud, of 87 Boscomb Place, Bournemouth, England.

Gunner Percy New returned from overseas on May 9, 1919, landing in Halifax.  His destination was “returning to sister, Springfield”.

Percy continued his trade as a machinist and moved to Walkerville, Essex County, where he was living when he was married on October 17, 1921 in Windsor to Muriel Beatrice Bowman, a native of St. Thomas living in Windsor, the daughter of George Bowman & Lottie Warner. Their marriage , which was reported in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, February 22, 1921, described Percy as a former Springfield man and a war veteran.  Following their marriage, they lived at 615 Langlois avenue, Windsor.

Percy died in Windsor on January 20, 1954, and is buried in Victoria Memorial Park Cemetery, Windsor.  His obituary appeared in the Windsor Star, January 21, 1954:

PERCY NEW

Funeral services for Percy New, customs officer, who was killed yesterday at the Ambassador Bridge compound, will be held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock. Services will be at the James H. Sutton Funeral Home, 937 Ouelette. Rev. Gordon W. Butt officiating. Burial will be in Victoria Memorial Park.

Special I.O.O.F. services under the auspices of Centennial Lodge No. 463 will be held this evening at 7:30. At eight o’clock tonight, Canadian Legion Branch 94 will hold services at the funeral home.

John Newell

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John Newell was born on December 31, 1889 in Malahide, the son of John Newell (1843-1912) & Elizabeth Plant (1850-1890).  John Newell Sr. was born in Malahide, the son of James Newell & Jane Lindsay.  He was a blacksmith and lived east of Aylmer near Walker Road. He and Elizabeth are buried in Seville Cemetery, Malahide.

In his father’s obituary in 1912, John was living in Alberta, but he returned to London, where he

was employed as a conductor and  where he was married on September 22, 1914 to Elizabeth (Lizzie) Verena Brown, also of London. She was born about 1887 in Gloucestershire, England, the daughter of John Brown & Ann Cooper.

He enlisted for service on Dec. 8, 1915 in London, having served for 10 months  in the 7th Fusiliers.  He was living at 330 Salisbury Street, London, at the time, and was a street car conductor.  He served for one year in the 135th O.S. Battalion, but was apparently discharged for medical reasons.  He re-enlisted on February 24, 1917 in London, this time giving his occupation as “motorman”. 

John died on December 30, 1938, and is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London with a military monument bearing the following inscription: 

“Pte. John Newell, 135 Battn. C.E.F., 30 December 1938″

His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, December 31, 1938:

JOHN NEWELL, VETERAN OF GREAT WAR, DIES

John Newell, 330 Salisbury street, a veteran of the war who had been ill for many months in Westminster Hospital, died there yesterday.

Mr. Newell was born near Aylmer but had spent most of his life in London. Prior to the war, he was a motorman on the L.S.R. He enlisted in the 135th Battalion C.E.F. and had not been in good health since his war service.  He was a member of King Solomon’s Lodge No. 378, A.F. & A.M., also of the Orange Order and the I.O.O.F. Surviving are his wife and two brothers, Herbert and Ernest Newell, both of Malahide Township.

The funeral service was conducted at the W.A. Hunt Funeral Home this afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. Interment was in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. The pallbearers were W. J. Marks, Archie Lilico, W.H. Slade, Vincent Gray, V. Browne, Joseph Newell. The services were in charge of Rev. T. J. Finlay, of St. Paul’s Cathedral.

David Lorne Newton

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The name “Lorne Newton” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Aylmer.

Although no attestation paper can be found for a man by this name, the Book of Remembrance gives the above service number, and describes him as a “cadet”.  He enlisted in September 1918 and served in the Royal Air Force.  He was discharged in February 1919.

David Lorne Newton  was born on January 20, 1899 at lot 13, concession 12, South Dorchester township, the son of David F. Newton (1860-1941) & Jeanetta Martin (1869-1917).  The family is found on the 1901 and 1911 census in South Dorchester.  David was the son of Thomas Newton & Ellen Young, and was farming in South Dorchester when he was married on August 14, 1888 in Aylmer to Jeanetta Martin, a native of Scotland, living in South Dorchester, the daughter of Robert & Christina Martin.  David & Jeanetta are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Lorne Newton was married on June 20, 1925 to Mary Laura Aileen Jones. They lived in Niagara Falls. Lorne died in 1983 and is buried with his wife in All Saints Anglican Church cemetery, Stamford Township, Welland County.

Edward Clifton Norman

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Edward Clifton Norman was born on January 11, 1902 in Eden, the son of Charles Norman (1876-1918) & Myrtle Viola Doan.  Charles was born in Malahide, the son of Joseph Edwards Norman & Eliza Wonnacott, and was farming in Yarmouth when he was married there on November 24, 1898 to Myrtle Doan, of Yarmouth, daughter of J. J. & Catherine Doan.  They later moved to Detroit.

He was a labourer living with his parents at 656 Lathrop Ave., Detroit when he enlisted for service on October 27, 1917 in Windsor.  He enlisted underage, giving his date of birth as January 11, 1900.

Following the war, Clifton returned to Detroit where he is found on the 1930 census in Detroit, employed as a public accountant.  He was married about 1925 to his wife Ethel, a native of Ohio, and they had three children: Jacqueline, 3, born in Michigan; Shirley A., 2, born in Ohio, and Charles F., 1, born in Ohio.

No further information is known.

 

George Phillips Oakes

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George Oakes was born on July 24, 1892 in Malahide, the son of Chauncey Oakes & Lucy Phillips (1860-1901).  Chauncey Oakes was born in Port Burwell, the son of Charles & Mary Oakes, and was farming in Malahide when he was married at Grovesend on November 6, 1889 to Lucy Phillips, of Malahide, the daughter of George & Mary.  Lucy died in 1901 and is buried in the Grovesend Cemetery.

George moved to the United States in 1912, and was living at 78 High Street West, Detroit, when he enlisted for service on June 3, 1917.  His occupation is given as motor cyclist, and he names his next of kin as his sister, Miss Mary Oakes of 561 Belleville Place, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

George returned to Canada in April 1919 from Detroit, and lived in Toronto where he was employed as a chauffeur when he was married on December 8, 1920 in Ottawa to Ruby Muriel Grace Wight, a resident of Ottawa, but native of London, England, the daughter of Arthur Wight & Sophia Beyes.  

In 1927 George & Ruby moved to Dearborn, Michigan where he worked in the auto industry.  They are found there on the 1930 census with two children, George L., born about 1923, and Gordon N., born about 1925.

George Oakes died on July 23, 1972 at the age of 79 in Zephyrhills, Pasco County, Florida.

Frank Oatman

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Frank Oatman was born on May 21, 1895 in South Norwich Township, Oxford County, the son of Angus Oatman & Alfretta Carroll.

Frank was farming with his parents at RR #2 Tillsonburg when he enlisted for service on May 31, 1918 in London.

He was a soldier training in London when he was married on July 17, 1918 at Dunboyne to Edna May Benner (1898-1979), of Dunboyne, the daughter of Wesley Benner & Ella Pressey.

Frank died on May 5, 1962 and is buried with his wife in Union cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, May 7, 1962:

FRANK OATMAN DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS SATURDAY EVENING

Frank Oatman, 166 Myrtle Street, died after a long illness at the Memorial Hospital on Saturday evening. He was 66. Mr. Oatman had been a resident of St. Thomas for 47 years, coming here from Tillsonburg district and working for the Pere Marquette as a trainman from that time until 1936 when he was injured in a railroad accident on the east end of the New York Central Canada Southern division and was forced to retire as a result.

Mr. Oatman was born near Tillsonburg and was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Angus Oatman, who farmed in that district. He was a member of Grace United Church and of Unity Lodge No. 47, B. of R.T.

He leaves his wife, Edna, and one daughter, Mrs. Charles (Bernice) Dunn, at home; four sisters, Mrs. George (Hazel) Bolton, Mrs. Gordon (Chelsea) Hannet and Mrs. Jessie Anderson, all of London, Ont., and Mrs. Maxwell (Cecelia) Palmer, Tillsonburg; one brother, Fred Oatman, Bayham Township; one grandson and one great grandson.

Rev. L. J. Coates, of Grace United Church, will conduct the funeral service at the P. R. Williams and Son Funeral Home at two p.m. Tuesday, and members of Unity Lodge will take part in the service. Interment will be made in Union cemetery.

Maxwell Clyde O’Bryan

3137395  Maxwell O'Bryan

Clyde O’Bryan was born on January 7, 1897 in Yarmouth Township, the son of Thomas O’Bryan (1864-1930) & Anna Catherine Donaldson (1866-1933).   Thomas was born in Nissouri Twsp., Oxford County, the son of Morris O’Bryan & Eliza Flake.  Catherine Donaldson was born in Rockford, Norfolk Co., the daughter of John Donaldson.  They farmed in the Luton district, and are buried in Luton cemetery.

Clyde was a thresher, railroad fireman and farmer living at R. R. #1 Dunboyne when he enlisted for service in London on May 30, 1918.

Clyde was married on February 18, 1928 to Ethel Marie Bodkin, daughter of Victor Bodkin, of Dexter, and continued to farm in the Luton district,. He was later married to Mattie Roberts.  Cylde died on July 28, 1964, and is buried in Luton cemetery.

Clyde’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 29, 1964:

CLYDE O’BRYAN

A lifelong resident of the district, Maxwell Clyde O’Bryan, 67, of 24 Sydenham Street West, died last evening in St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital. He had been ill for two weeks.  Mr. O’Bryan, a laborer, was born in South Yarmouth on Jan. 7, 1897, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Thomas O’Bryan.  He was an adherent of the United Church.

Surviving are his wife, the former Mattie Roberts; one son, Richard M., in Ottawa; one daughter, Mrs. James (Patricia Marie) Hallan in Burlington; one brother, Gordon, Aylmer; one sister, Mrs. Jessie Wardle, Belmont; seven grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.

The Rev. Allan Logan of St. Paul’s United Church will conduct the service on Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Hughson Funeral Home. Burial in Luton cemetery.

An account of his funeral was printed in the August 5, 1964 edition:

CLYDE O’BRYAN

Service for Maxwell Clyde O’Bryan, a lifelong resident of Aylmer and a veteran of World War 1, was held Thursday afternoon at the Hughson Funeral Home. The Rev. Allan Logan of St. Paul’s United Church conducted the service with Mrs. James Wright at the organ.

Pallbearers were Verne Welter, Russell Nelson, Bruce Marr, Russell Boughner, James Brackenbury and Harvey Marr.  Burial was in the family plot in Luton cemetery. Friends and relatives attended from St. Thomas, Belmont, Aylmer and district.

Dr. Frederick Russell Orris

The name “Russell Oriss” is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.  Fred Orris

This man is believed to be Frederick Russell Orris, who was born on March 30, 1892 in South Dorchester, the son of Frederick Henry Orris (1855-1922) & Matilda Laur (1858-1931).  Frederick was born in Markham, the son of William Orris & Mary Heard, and was farming in South Dorchester when he was married there on February 12, 1884 to Matilda Laur, of South Dorchester, the daughter of John C. & Sarah Laur. Frederick & Matilda lived at lot 8, concession 10, South Dorchester.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

An attestation paper cannot be found for Frederick R. Orris, but according to his obituary, he served with the Royal Flying Corps. This may indicate he enlisted in England. The Book of Remembrance indicates that he served with the Royal Air Force, and had enlisted in June 1917.  In a list of British Medal recipients, there is a Pte. Fred R. Orris, of the 24th London Regiment, who received a medal during service in France on October 10, 1915.

Dr. Orris moved to the United States and practiced in Saginaw, Michigan.  He died in Dearborn Heights on September 26, 1988 at the age of 96.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 14, 1988:

Dr. Frederick R. Orris

Dr. Frederick R. Orris, D.D.S., 96, of Saginaw, Michigan died at Dearborn Heights Health Centre on September 26, 1988.  He was born on March 31, 1892 in Springfield, son of the late Fred and Matilda (Laur) Orris. He was a veteran of the First Great War, having served with the Royal Flying Corps.  He was graduated from the University of Iowa with a degree in dentistry, and practiced in Saginaw for many years with his brother Edward.  Dr. Orris was an avid golfer, and played on district courses when visiting the Aylmer area two or three times a year.  He used to rent a cottage in Port Bruce during the summers.  He was a member of the Canadian Legion and the Masons.  Dr. Orris is survived by his wife Grace (Dorwood) Orris; son Fred Orris Jr., of Dearborn; daughter Margaret Galbraith of Ann Arbor; four grandchildren; one great grandson.  He was predeceased by four brothers and one sister.  The funeral was held Wednesday, September 28 at W. L. Case & Company Funeral Chapel in Saginaw.

George Clarke Orton

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George Orton was born on December 24, 1898 in Aylmer,  the son of James Whitfield Orton (1854-1940) & Mary Elizabeth Hopkins (1856-1900).  They were married in Aylmer on August 24, 1878.  James was born in Bayham, the son of William N. Orton & Roxana Baker. Mary Hopkins was in Aylmer, the daughter of Edwin & Harriet Hopkins.  James & Mary are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  George’s brother, Claude Elmer Orton, died in service on August 10, 1918.

George was a barber living at 319 Talbot Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on January 7, 1917 in St. Thomas.  He had served with the 30th Battery C.F.A. in Aylmer, and enlisted with the 241st Overseas Battalion, C.E.F. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on June 6.

Following the war, George returned to Aylmer where he was again working as a barber when he was married on September 24, 1920 in St. Thomas to Marjorie Kenn, a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, the daughter of John & Helen Kenn.  Marjorie was also living in Aylmer at the time.

George and Marjorie moved to the United States in 1924, settling in Lorain County, Ohio. They appear there on the 1930 census in Amherst village, where George is employed as an electrician in a steel mill.  They had one daughter at the time, Helen, born 1927 in Ohio.  Also living with them is George’s brother James.

George died in Lorain County, Ohio on September 17, 1980.  His wife Marjorie died on July 9, 1970 in Lorain, Ohio.

James Whitfield Orton

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James Whitfield Orton was born on September 2, 1896 in Aylmer, the son of James Whitfield Orton (1854-1940) & Mary Elizabeth Hopkins (1856-1900).  They were married in Aylmer on August 24, 1878.  James was born in Bayham, the son of William N. Orton & Roxana Baker. Mary Hopkins was in Aylmer, the daughter of Edwin & Harriet Hopkins.  James & Mary are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  James’s brother, Claude Elmer Orton, died in service on August 10, 1918.

James was living in Aylmer working as a packer in the Condensed Milk Factory when he enlisted for service on April 22, 1916 in Guelph.  He had served in the 30th Battery, C.F.A. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on July 12.

Following the war, he moved to Lorain County, Ohio where he was working as an electrician in a steel mill.  He was living with his brother George and family on the 1930 census in Amherst Village, Lorain Co., Ohio.

James died in Lorain, Ohio on December 29, 1982.

 

Frank Leslie Ostrander

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Frank Ostrander was born on January 12, 1894 in Malahide, the son of Frank Ostrander (1870-1949) & Christena Barnes (1870-1940).  Frank Ostrander Sr. was a native of Aylmer, the son of Isaac & Sarah Ann, and was a farmer.  He was married at New Sarum on March 4, 1891 to Christina Barnes, of New Sarum, the daughter of John Barnes & Annie Brower.  They are buried in Orwell Cemetery.

Frank was a farmer living at Orwell when he enlisted for service on March 14, 1918 in London.

He was a farmer living in Aylmer when he was married in Brantford on June 12, 1918 to Mabel Evans (1896-1933), of Brantford, daughter of Arthur Evans & Carrie J. Matthews.

Frank died on July 24, 1965 and is buried with his wife in Orwell cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 28, 1965:

FRANK OSTRANDER

Frank Ostrander of Orwell, died suddenly Saturday morning at the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. He was 71.  Born in Malahide Township, he was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Frank Ostrander. A retired farmer and carpenter, Mr. Ostrander lived his entire life in Malahide and Yarmouth Townships. He was an adherent of the Baptist Church.

Survivors include four sons, Donald Ostrander, Orwell; Arthur Ostrander, Fingal; Robert Ostrander, Cowal, and Clifford Ostrander, Scotland, Ontario; two daughters, Mrs. Donald (Gertrude) Ashton, Aylmer; and Mrs. Gordon (Vivian) Stanley, Shedden; one brother Charles Ostrander, RR 1 Corinth; and one sister Mrs. Hazel Huffman, New Sarum.

Service was held at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Tuesday afternoon, the Rev. Fred Ward officiating. Burial was in the Orwell Cemetery.  The pallbearers were Donald McFarlane, Charles McCutcheon, Thomas Bates, George Judd, Joseph Harkes and Hugh Couse.  The beautiful floral tributes were carried by Clifford Ashton, William Ostrander, Norman Ostrander, Wayne Ostrander and David Stanley.  Friends and relatives attended from Sarnia, Chatham, Cowal, Shedden, St. Thomas, Fingal, Springfield, Scotland, Aylmer and district.

John R. Ostrander

83147

John Ostrander’s name is found in an Roll of Honor of men who enlisted, printed in the East Elgin Tribune, March 2, 1916.  He is described as of “Aylmer”.

John was born on January 10, 1880 in Tillsonburg, the son of Albert Ostrander (1858-1916) & Janet Dickie (1854-1911).  John’s middle name on his birth registration is given as “Richard”, while on his attestation paper he states it is “Robert”.

Albert Ostrander was the son of Ebenezer & Elizabeth Ostrander, and was living in Aylmer when he was married on September 20, 1874 in Norwich to Janet Dickie, of Tillsonburg, the daughter of Robert & Rachel Dickie.   Albert & Janet are found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Aylmer. Janet is buried in Dobbie Cemetery, Bayham Township. Albert moved to Rosefeld, Manitoba where he died in 1916.

John was a mechanic and not married when he enlisted for service on February 26, 1915 in Toronto. He names his next of kin as his father Albert, of Aylmer.

He returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 30.  The passenger list states his destination is Toronto. No further information can be found.

 

Jack Wollstein Owen

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Jack Owen was born on September 8, 1898 in Wellington, Shropshire, England, the son of John Warden Owen & Mary Elizabeth Wollstein, who were married in Shropshire in 1894.  The family is found in the 1901 England census living on King Street, in Wellington, Shropshire, where John is a merchant tailor.

Jack emigrated to Canada and was a farmer living at Corinth when he enlisted for service on November 23, 1915 in Tillsonburg. He names as his next of kin his mother, Mary E. Owen, of No. 1 Mill Bank, Wellington, Shropshire.

Following the war, Jack was living in Tillsonburg employed as a steelworker when he was married there on November 11, 1920 to Mabel Oatman, of Tillsonburg, the daughter of Lyman Oatman & Annie Eliza Cole.

No further information can be found.

Arthur Pace

Arthur Pace’s name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna.  This man cannot positively be identified, but it is possible that he is the same man as Dr. Arthur Pace, son of Calvin Pace (1828-1908) and Rachel Skinner (1840-1943), who are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.  

Arthur Albert Pace was born on November 22, 1869 in Sparta, and went to the United States between 1889 and 1896.  He was married on October 26, 1897 to Daisy A. Wareham, and they are found on the 1900 census in Chelsea, Iowa.  By 1920, they were living in Toledo, Ohio and had one daughter Phyllis, age 5, born in Iowa.

Dr. Pace died on August 8, 1956 in Toledo, Ohio, and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery there.

No record can be found of Dr. Pace serving with a Canadian Regiment.  His name does not appear in American military records.

Andrew Eric Paddon

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The name “Andrew Paddon”  is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Andrew Eric Paddon was born on March 3, 1896 in Yarmouth, the son of William Paddon (1859-1936) & Alice Ann Westlake (1862-1936).  William was born in Southwold, the son of William & Mary Paddon, and was farming in Yarmouth when he was married there on February 14, 1883 to Alice Westlake, also of Yarmouth, the daughter of George & Mary Westlake.  The family is found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Yarmouth.  William & Alice are buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Ave.

Andrew was farming with his parents at R.R. #8 St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on April 23, 1918 in London.

Andrew was married in 1927 to Bertha May Wadland (1891-1978). He died on August 16, 1987, and is buried with his wife in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Ave. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, August 17, 1987:

ANDREW PADDON

Andrew E. Paddon, of Valleyview Home for the Aged, St. Thomas, and formerly of RR 8 St. Thomas, secretary-treasurer for many years of the former Yarmouth Rural Telephone Company, passed away at Valleyview on Sunday, Aug. 16, 1987. He was 91.

Mr. Paddon was born in North Yarmouth Township on March 3, 1896, to the late William and Alice (Westlake) Paddon. He lived at RR 8 St. Thomas for most of his life, farming there until five years ago. He was a member of Yarmouth Centre United Church.

His wife, Berdie (Wadland) Paddon, died Jan. 26, 1978. Mr. Paddon is survived by a son, William E. Paddon, of 12 Dunkirk Drive, St. Thomas; two grandchildren, David W. Paddon and Dr. Robert C. Paddon, both of Toronto; and several nieces and nephews, including Mary A. Paddon, of RR 8 St. Thomas. He was the last of his own family. A sister, Myrtle M. Paddon, and a brother, Mervyn W. Paddon, died in 1970.

Resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, St. Thomas, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday, for services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday with Rev. Roger Landell of Yarmouth Centre United Church officiating. Interment in family plot of St. Thomas Cemetery. Remembrances to Yarmouth Centre United Church or charity.

John Cyril Page

189401

John Page’s name is found in a list of recruits for the 91st Battalion, printed in the Aylmer Express, December 2, 1915.  He is described as a farmer, single, of Belmont. 

John was born on March 21, 1895 in London, England.  His parents died when he was an infant, and he was placed in Dr. Barnardo’s Home for orphans.  He is found on the 1901 England census living in the home of Eliza Mills, on Thornham Road, Mellis, Suffolk, England. He is 6 years of age, and the census indicates he is from Dr. Barnardo’s home.  He emigrated to Canada at the age of 16, leaving Liverpool on March 31, 1911 on the ship Virginian, and arriving in Halifax on April 7, 1911.

He is found on the 1911 census in South Dorchester, living with James & Lucy Jenkins.

He enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on November 20, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He gives his address as “care of F. Barons, Belmont”.  He names his next of kin as his uncle, Alfred Page, of London, England. 

A passenger list of returning soldiers shows a  J. C. Page, residence St. Thomas, arriving in Quebec on September 25, 1917.  An article found in the St. Thomas Daily Times, October 15, 1917 tells of John’s return to Canada:

TWO MORE ST. THOMAS MEN RETURN HOME

Two St. Thomas men returned from England, during the weekend, one of them a former 91st Battalion man and another a former member of the 33rd Battalion. The men have little to say concerning their experiences.  Pte. J. C. Page, a former 33rd Battalion man was injured at the battle of Courcelette, and is now suffering from shell shock.  Pte. J. Teddy of the 91st Battalion was invalided from England as unfit for further service. The men were met in London by prominent citizens and the members of the Soldiers Aid Commission and on their arrival here, were welcomed by members of the local association.

A marriage record was found for a John Page, soldier, of London, born in London, England in 1895, to Lucy Elizabeth Haycock, also of London, but a native of St. Thomas.  They were married in London on September 18, 1918. On the record, John states that his parents died when he was an infant.

John “Jack” Page died on September 1, 1957, and is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London, with his wife Lucy E. (Born 1895). His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, September 2, 1957:

PAGE – At Westminster Hospital on Sunday, September 1, 1957, Jack C. Page, beloved husband of Lucy E. Haycock, 466 Dorinda street, and dear father of Mrs. George (Olive) Johnston and Jack V. Page, both residing in London. Resting at James M. Carrothers and Son Funeral Home, 843 Dundas St., where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday, September 3 at 2 p.m.  Interment in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

James Edward Paget

603152  James Paget

James Paget was born on February 4, 1897 at Devizes,  Wiltshire, England, the son of Joseph Paget (1865-1953) & Ada E. Bryant (1875-1962).  The family is found on the 1901 census living at #4 Clayhole, Roundway, Devizes, Wiltshire.  James emigrated with his parents and siblings in 1913, leaving Liverpool on the ship Tunisian, and arriving in Quebec on May 26.  Joseph & Ada are buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin.

James was a farmer living with his parents at R.R. #2 Belmont when he enlisted for service in London on August 30, 1915.  While in England, his duties involved guarding a building which is believed to have housed ammunition, and as a result of sleeping on the wet ground, he became ill with spinal meningitis.  He was the only soldier in his battalion that survived the infection, but he developed a heart murmur due to the illness and was later discharged. 

Following the war, James returned to the Springfield area and was a farmer when he was married on August 20, 1919 in Springfield to  Beatrice Corless (1899-1972), of South Dorchester, the daughter of William Corless & Hulda Manning.  

James died on March 20, 1984 and is buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin with his wife.

His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, March 20, 1984:

JAMES EDWARD PAGET

James Edward Paget, 87, of RR 4 Aylmer, passed away at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital today, Tuesday, March 20, 1984.  Born at Devizes, Wiltshire, England, on February 4, 1897, the son of the late Joseph and Ada (Bryant) Paget, Mr. Paget came to Canada in 1913.  A retired farmer, he lived most of his life at Glencolin, Ont.

He was a member of St. John’s United Church, Springfield, and chairman of the Trinity Cemetery Board for many years.  He was a veteran of the First World War.

His wife, the former Beatrice Corless, died 12 years ago.  Surviving are son, Mac Paget of Dresden, Ont.; daughters Mrs. Melvin (Marion) Sloan, Kitchener, Ont., and Mrs. Ray (Arlene) Martin, of St. Thomas; sisters Mrs. Hilda King, in England; Mrs. Stella Parsons, of Aylmer; Mrs. Lillian Jefferson, of St. Thomas, and eight grandchildren.  Funeral arrangements were incomplete.  H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home in charge.

Alva Leroy Parker

3138867

Alva Leroy Parker was born on November 29, 1893 in the Luton area of  Malahide, the son of Alva Wellington Parker (1855-1925) & Mary Davis (1855-1938). Alva was born in Yarmouth, the son of Nelson & Ruth Parker, and was living in Yarmouth when he was married on October 3, 1878 in St. Thomas to Mary Davis, also a native and resident of Yarmouth, the daughter of William A. & Matilda Davis.  They farmed in the Luton area, but at the time of his death, Alva W. Parker was living in Welwyn, Saskatchewan.

Alva Leroy (Roy) Parker was a farmer living at R. R. #1 Dunboyne when he enlisted for service on June 6, 1918.  An article in the Aylmer Express in April 1943 reported the marriage of Roy Parker, son of the late A. W., of Aylmer, to Mrs. Louise Hallum in Compton, California. The article states that “Mr. Parker is one of Compton’s best known real estate men, having been in business there for the past 18 years”

Roy died in 1964.

Clarence Leo Parker

3133073

Clarence Leo Parker was born on February 15, 1893 in Aylmer, the son of Leman Jerome Parker (1860-1946) & Enid Elizabeth Monteith (1862-1910).  Leman was born in Romeo, Michigan, the son of Alanson J. & Polly Parker.  He was a carriage painter living in Aylmer when he was married there on July 27, 1887 to Enid Monteith, of Aylmer, daughter of William & Elizabeth Monteith.  Leman & Enid are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Clarence was living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 5, 1918 in London.

He died on February 10,  1971 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, February 17, 1971:

CLARENCE L. PARKER

Service for Clarence Leo Parker of Pine Street East who died February 10, 1971 in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital was held at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Saturday, Feb. 13, 1971. Harry V. Faulkner of The Church of Christ Scientist, St. Thomas, conducted the service during which Mrs. James Wright presided at the organ.  Interment was in Aylmer cemetery. Relatives and friends attended from St. Thomas, Aylmer and district.  Mr. Parker was in his 78th year.

He was a son of the late Leman Parker and the former Enid Monteith and was born in Aylmer where he had lived most of his life. He was a member of the Church of Christ Scientists, St. Thomas and Boston. In recent years, he was a dealer in antiques and a music teacher. A graduate of the London Conservatory of Music, he played for silent movies in London and for a number of years was organist and choir leader at Trinity Anglican Church in Aylmer and Springfield United Church. He served in the medical corps during World War I and was a member of Col. Talbot Br. 81, Royal Canadian Legion, Aylmer.

Surviving are his two cousins, Mrs. Lena Brown and Mrs. Violet Monteith, both of Aylmer.

Isaac Clayton Parker

3353679

Clayton Parker was born on October 8, 1895 in Malahide near Luton, the son of Alva Wellington Parker (1855-1925) & Mary A. Davis (1855-1938).  Alva was born in Yarmouth, the son of Nelson & Ruth Parker, and was married on October 3, 1878 in St. Thomas to Mary Davis, also of Yarmouth, the daughter of William A. & Matilda Davis.  They farmed in the Luton area, but at the time of his death, Alva W. Parker was living in Welwyn, Saskatchewan.

Clayton was employed as a hired man by Willard Bowen, where he appears on the 1911 Malahide census.  He and his parents moved to Welwyn, Saskatchewan where he was farming when he enlisted for service on June 27, 1918 in Regina.

Clayton was married to Pearl Bowey.  He died on May 15, 1980.

John Leslie Parker

84172  John Parker

John Leslie Parker was born on June 24, 1873 in Malahide, the son of Sidney John Parker (1841-1913) & Rosilla (Rosa) Shamiel (1845-1913).  Sidney was born in Yarmouth township, the son of William Parker & Mary (Ann) Sensabaugh, and was married on December 18, 1862 to Rosilla Shamiel, a native of Buffalo, New York living in Yarmouth, daughter of Nicholas & Rosilla Shamiel.  Sidney & his wife Rosa died one day apart, at Dexter in Yarmouth township.

On his attestation paper, John states he was born in Malahide township, while his obituary gives his place of birth as Dexter, in Yarmouth township. His birth registration confirms that he was born in Malahide.

John was a painter living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 13, 1914 in London.  He belonged to the 30th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery, and is included in a list of recruits in the Aylmer Express, November 19, 1914.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Mrs. W. H. Finch, of Aylmer.

He was wounded in 1916, and the following articles were published in the Aylmer Express, May 11, 1916, telling of his injuries:

DRIVER JACK L. PARKER SERIOUSLY WOUNDED

His sister here, Mrs. W. H. Finch, has this week received the following letters from the Canadian Red Cross Commissioner and Captain A. M. Howe, of the 16th Battery, C.F.A., informing her of her brother’s serious injuries. This will be sad news for Jack’s many friends here.

16th Battery, 4th C.F.A. Bde.

2nd Canadian Div., B.E.F.

April 19, 1916

Dear Madam:
It is with deep regret that I write to inform you of the wounding of your brother, Driver Parker, on Monday afternoon, the 17th.  He said that you were not to be written to for some time until he sent word, but as notice of this will come to you through official channels, I think it better to write you now.  He had been my groom for five months past, so that I am personally interested in his welfare, and was very much grieved when he got wounded. He had been out with me all morning, and we had returned a little time after the usual dinner hour. He was sitting cooking his dinner over the fire in one end of the stable, when a shell came over and he was caught by some of the splinters. We were able to get him to the Field Ambulance without much delay, and he received all the attention that can be got at these advanced dressing stations.  I saw him off in an ambulance about an hour after the accident, and he would receive every attention at the Hospital, which he would reach half an hour afterwards. He received several wounds in both legs, shoulder, and face, but stood it all wonderfully well, and I did not hear him complain at his ill-luck.  He came out here to fight, he said, and must take what was coming without grumbling.  I am sorry to lose him, as he was a good groom, and always took a great interest in my horses.  I have not heard of him since he left, but I hop he will receive good attention and make a good recovery.  His friend Jack Wallis, who is my batman, took charge of his personal things, and gave me what money he had in his pockets, and I shall keep this until I find out what he wishes done with it.  

Yours truly, A. M. Howe, Captain

Information Department, Canadian Red Cross Society

14-16 Cockspur Street, London, S.W. April 22, 1916

Dear Madam
I beg to inform you that Driver J. L. Parker, No. 84172, C.F.A., who is now at No. 13 Stationary Hospital, B.E.F., France, was visited a day or two ago by our authorized visitor.  We have just now received her report, and we very much regret to say that she informs us that he is dangerously wounded, and that his condition is very serious.  Everything possible will be done for his care and comfort by the hospital and by the Red Cross Society, and I most sincerely trust that we may soon be able to write to you that he is out of danger and making progress.

Yours truly, M. S. Watters, Canadian Red Cross Commissioner

A report on Driver Parker’s condition was printed in the June 1, 1916 issue of the Aylmer Express:

DRIVER JACK PARKER ON WAY TO RECOVERY

Expects to Come Home as Soon as Able

Will Carry Receipt That He Has Been Where They Kill Them, and Think Nothing Of It.

Mrs. W. H. Finch, of this place, has received a letter from her brother, Driver Jack Parker, of the 16th Battery, who was so seriously injured from an exploding shell last April.  Jack’s many friends will hope for a speedy recovery.

London, Eng., May 15, 1916.

Dear Sister:
Just a few lines to let you know how I am.  I suppose you will think me dead, as you have not heard from me in so long. Well, I am no better than a dead one at present. I was wounded on the 17th of April, and I can tell you I was hit good and hard. Poor Jack Wallace, when he came to where I was wounded, felt so bad he cried good and hard, and I told him not to do that as it did not make things any better. They took me to the first dressing station, and Jack stuck to me till my wounds were dressed. When they took me to the hospital in France, I remained there till the 3rd of May, then I was put on the hospital ship for England. All this time I have been as helpless as a babe. I can’t move off my back, and I will be that way for some time to come. I do not know if the worse is over or not, but I sure hope it is, as I have suffered much dreadful pain. I am just beginning to use my left hand, so I can manage to write a little. I will bring home a receipt that I will carry for life to show I have been where they kill them and think nothing of it.  Old Fritz trimmed me a good one, but he did not break my heart, as I have a good strong one yet.

The boys that have been wounded and have recovered are going back every day to the firing line to give Fritz another whirl, but as for me, I only wish I could go back and give the Old Hun another round; but I am disabled, so I cannot go back on the firing line again.  You sure will not know me when I come home, if I live to get there. It will be a long time before I am well, and then my next trip will be my homecoming, back to good old Canada, and in the land of the living. I had Mrs. Simpson, wife of the major of our battery, to see me today.  She brought me a lot of nice flowers and a nice lot of dainties to eat. She asked me for your address, and I gave it to her, so you may expect a letter from her. She is in Folkestone, England. She is awfully nice, and she sure thinks a lot of the boys of the 16th Battery. Tell Charlie to keep my rifle shining, and when I come home we will go for a squirrel hunt.

Give my best regards to all my friends. I must stop till tomorrow, as I am tired out. I do not know if you can read this scribbling or not, as it is the best I can do. This is my first letter since I was wounded.

Best wishes till we meet again, and may that be soon. Your loving brother, Jack.

Hello again – Well this is another day, and I am feeling very good. I have just had my wounds dressed, and I feel very good, so I thought it a good time to finish your letter.  The 16th Battery is getting hit good and hard, but they have got the staying qualities and they are going to it; and they sure do get the Huns right and left.  Did Harry Richardson come home?  He left the Battery at Christmas time. I have not heard of him since.  I suppose young Wooster arrived home safe. I had Billy Bates to see me several times. As soon as I am well I think I will be on my homeward journey, but it will be a long time yet before I am well; but trust it will be a hasty recovery.  I sure will do my part to get well, and a little more.  I will close with loving thoughts of you all.

Jack

Driver J. L. Parker, 16th Battery C.F.A., 1st Gen. Hospital, London, Eng., Camberwell, S.E.

Mrs. Simpson’s letter to Mrs. Finch was printed in the Aylmer Express, June 8, 1916:

DRIVER JACK PARKER’S CONDUCT SPLENDID AFTER BEING WOUNDED

Loses an Eye, Possibly One Leg and the Use of One Arm

Result of Exploding Shell

Mrs. W. H. Finch, of this place, has received the following interesting letter from Mrs. (Major) Simpson, concerning Driver Jack Parker, which shows how seriously he was been injured, and his wonderful cheerfulness.  It is interesting to note that in his letter published in the Express last week, he never even mentioned the seriousness of his injuries, and was so optimistic and bright.

London, E.C., May 18, 1916:

Dear Mrs. Finch:

As soon as I was informed of your brother’s arrival in England, I went up to London to see him, and I feel I must write and tell you what a brick he is. I found him writing to you, and doing it under difficulties.  It is so fortunate he is able to use his left hand so much.

It is a lovely hospital, No. 1, London General, and I am enclosing you the card to let you see how splendidly our Canadian Red Cross do their work.  I spoke to the nurse, and she said, “We all love him, as he is so bright and cheerful”.  I spoke about his left leg, and I am afraid I have nothing encouraging to say to you about it. They are trying to save it, but as a large piece of bone is gone, they are very much afraid; but I would request you do not mention this to him. You know that his right eye is gone, but our eye hospital here in Folkestone is turning out such splendid matches in glass eyes that it will be hardly noticeable. His right arm is suffering from shell shock, but the electric treatment he will get may restore same. The wonder to me is that he is alive and he is very much so, and I am so proud of him. He is certainly a splendid example of our good old 16th Battery. They have had it very badly lately, and the only original officer left is Capt. Brown. My husband, the Major, is at the base in France, suffering with neuritis, and I am hoping he will be sent over to me in England very soon.

I hope to see your brother very often, as I frequently run up to town. I am waiting on word of Lieut. Drew’s removal to England, he has been badly wounded in the arm.  If there is anything I can do for you, please do not hesitate to ask. I always have my letters come to my bank address, and they are forwarded to me at once. Do not worry over your brother needlessly; he is in splendid hands and getting the best of care. We cannot get away with his good spirits, but I find this is nearly always the case with our boys – they bear pain marvelously.

With best regards, in which my husband joins – Believe me.

Sincerely yours, Margaret Y. Simpson

A letter from Jack to his sister was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, September 28, 1916:

CHATTY LETTER FROM JOHN PARKER

Telling of His Wounds

London, England, Sept. 7th, 1916

Mrs. W. H. Finch, Aylmer

Dear Sister and Brother – Just a few lines to let you know that I received your welcome letters of June 22 and Aug. 21. I was pleased to hear that you are all well. This leaves me improving slowly. Of course under such circumstances it is impossible for me to make a speedy recovery, although I am doing wonderfully well.

In regard to the nature of my wounds the letters you have received from me did not give any idea how bad they were. No doubt you have heard many different versions of the way I was wounded. But I thought it would be better to keep as many of my troubles packed in my old kit bag as possible, and smile, smile, smile. I can assure you I have smiled many a time, when it would almost take my life, just to cheer my comrade lying next to me. It sure would give you the horrors to see what I have seen in the hospital, not to mention the horrors on the firing line.

While in the hospital in France I was as helpless as a babe and as I lay there I could see comrades dying all about, not knowing but that I should be the next. At that time death would have been a pleasure to me as I was in so much pain.

Now dear sister I will give you the details of my misfortune. It was on the 17th of April when I received my wounds. My left leg was shattered about three inches below the knee. I should judge that about three inches of the bone was blown away. The leaders of my right leg are completely gone and a large piece of flesh gone from just above the heel. My right arm had a hole through the muscle at the shoulder as large as a walnut with the shuck on, but no bone was broken there. On the point of my left shoulder is a wound four inches long right to the bone. There is still a piece of shell in my left shoulder. They could not remove it as it is bedded in the bone. There is also a wound on the back of my neck two inches long and I have lost my right eye which I miss very much. I have had five operations and three X-rays and I do not want any more operations though I may have to have one on my left leg which does not improve very rapidly. I have received many nice letters from Aylmer which I am sorry to say I have not got answered. I especially enjoyed Mr. W. H. Barnum’s and in fact all others. I think I have received all mail which has been posted to me since I have been wounded, also the paper which James Anger is sending me. (Many thanks James for the same). It is useless for me to try and give you any details of what is going on in the trenches, as it would never get through. All I can say is that it is FIERCE, so I will leave the rest for you to imagine. I again thank each and every one and say that I appreciated every letter and card that I received. Trusting that this finds you all enjoying the best of health in our land of freedom, in GOOD OLD CANADA. That is why I came here to help hold what we have. I still remain your loving brother,

L. Parker, 84172 Brondesbury Park Hospital, London, England.

A letter from Jack to Harold Barnum was printed in the Aylmer Express, January 4, 1917:

AN INTERESTING LETTER FROM DRIVER JACK PARKER

Although He Has Suffered Great Pain Writes W. Harold Barnum in His Usual Bright Style

Hopes the Doctors May Save His Leg – Sends Sure Cure for German Measles

Brondesbury Park Military Hospital, London N.W., Eng.

Dec. 17, 1916

Dear Harold –
Your most welcome and appreciated letter to hand of long ago, dated June 3, and in reply would say I am very sorry I have not answered it before this. Although I trust you will pardon me of being late with reply. No doubt you quite remember the old saying “better late than never”. Although it is better never late. Well, Harold, I think it is a very poor rule that does not work both ways.  You see if I had been late in arriving back to where the shell dropped it sure would have missed me, but being always on time and on the job while at the front. Oh yes, they say we early birds get the worm. Well, I was early and I sure got the worm. Some worm, eh?  I sure got badly bent trying to carry it away, but I got away with it. But am still badly bent. It almost broke me all up; the only thing it could not break was my heart, because I had a barbed wire entanglement around that, so you see Harold, that was ‘shell proof’. I am sure it is useless for me to try and give you the details of this great struggle. All I can say, it is simply Hell on earth and wholesale slaughter. Words can’t tell.

No doubt there have been all sorts of reports of my injury. No doubt you have heard the true nature of my wounds as I have given a correct account of them to Henry and no doubt they were published. Regarding my wounds at time of writing, they are all healed except my left leg.  I was down and had my leg x-rayed for the fourth time. Do not know the outcome yet. There has been no improvement in it for the last four months. I sure have suffered everything but death, especially at night, the pain is fierce. From what I could gather from the doctors’ conversation, they are going to graft a piece of bone in, so you see if I have to go through that I sure will be here till midsummer before I am fit to travel homeward. I hope and trust that nothing sets in. If so, I am likely to lose my leg above the knee, but knee joint is good, and has full movement in it. You wanted to know if I was wounded where Harry Richardson thought I was. No, we had moved several times since Harry left us. I was wounded in Dickiebush, near Ridgewood.  Harry will know I think. He was with us the second place we went into action. Only stopped there a short time and came out again; the time we were 11 ½ hours in the saddle. Some torture, eh?

I have not had opportunity to see Billy Bates since the last time I saw him. We were on the frontier of France shortly after I was wounded. I have a picture of Alfred Benson beating it when that shell came near enough for him to hear the tune they hum, ‘gathering in the sheaves’, ha! ha!  I can tell you Harold, the air is full of romantic and also rheumatic. In regards to the reports of the North Sea scrap, which was in our favor, the Germans ran away. They can’t stick it at any stage of the game. They are dirty fighters, and no two ways about it. I had Thomas Light to see me here, and Will Dunning and Dick Wright, and I gave them a few good pointers, if they only follow them they will profit by them, as I know because I have been through the mill from hopper to bag, and I am still in the bag. But the string will soon break as I am improving and soon will be delivered. I also had Bateman to see me at Camberwell. Will close trusting you have had a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Give my regards to all and tell Henry and sister I am O.K.  

P.S. Your prescription for German Measles as promised in Mr. Youell’s letter. With kindest regards, Jack

“A Certain Cure for German Measles – Mix some Woolwich powder with tincture of iron or essence of lead, then administer in pills (or shells). Have ready a little British army for a little goes a long way. Some Brussels sprouts and French mustard; then add a very little of Canadian cheese with Australian lamb, Italian macaroni, Indian curry. Set on a Kitchener and keep stirring until quite hot. If this does not make the patient perspire freely, then rub the best of Russian bear’s grease on the chest and wrap in Berlin wool. This is the private and exclusive prescription of Dr. Cannon. The patient on no account must have any peace – soup until the swelling in the head has quite disappeared – J. L. Parker”

John returned from overseas in December 1917, and his photograph with the following caption appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 20, 1917:

“Driver John Parker, who returned home last week from England, after three years spent in service for his country. Driver Parker left Canada with the 16th Battery under Col. Brown. After training in England he went to France with his battery along with some 12 other Aylmer men. He was billeted in a barm and on returning on the evening of April 17, 1916, to his billet, after a sixty mile ride in the saddle, he was standing by a fire, he and his chum had made, when a German shell made almost a direct hit on the building. He was blown into the air and when they got him to a hospital he was found to have suffered eleven serious wounds. Driver Parker has been in the hospitals in England for more than a year and a half, and although he has had to undergo several operations, has lost one eye, and may het lose the use of one leg, he is nevertheless cheerful and happy that he was not killed instantly. He is not discharged yet and has to report to Guelph soon. He is visiting his sister, Mrs. W. H. Finch in the meantime, and fully expects to get his discharge.”

John remained in Aylmer and was married on July 8, 1926 to Elizabeth Finch, a widow living in Aylmer, the daughter of John Silverthorn & Mary Bowden. On their marriage record John states he was born in Port Bruce, and is a widower. Record of his first marriage cannot be found.

John died on November 21, 1958 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, November 22, 1958: [note his first name and middle initial are incorrect in the headline]

JAMES J. PARKER, 85, WAS DEXTER NATIVE

Aylmer – James L. Parker, a resident of Aylmer the last 50 years, passed away suddenly on Friday at his home on Fourth Avenue in his 85th year. He had been in ill health for the last two years.

The son of the late Sydney Parker and Rosella Shamiel, Mr. Parker was born at Dexter. He was a veteran of World War I and served with the Royal Canadian Artillery.

He is survived by one sister, Gladys, of Key West, Florida, and one brother, William John Parker, of Dexter.  The remains are resting here at the James H. Barnum Funeral Home where the service will be conducted at three p.m. Monday by Rev. Fred M. Ward, of the Aylmer Baptist Church. Burial will be made in Aylmer cemetery.

 

Arthur Ewart Learn Parkes

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Arthur Parkes was born on July 2, 1898 at Kingsmill in Yarmouth Township, the son of Solomon L. Parkes (1856-1942) & Victoria Pearce (1867-1944).  Solomon was born in Malahide, the son of Solomon & Elsie Ann Parkes and was a farmer there when he was married on October 7, 1891 in South Norwich Township, Oxford Co., to Victoria Pearce, of South Norwich, daughter of Thomas & Maria Pearce.  They later lived at Kingsmill and are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Arthur was farmer living at Kingsmill when he enlisted for service on June 4, 1918 in London. He returned from overseas on September 29, 1919, arriving in Halifax.

He was living in Yarmouth township when he was married on November 15, 1922 at Kingsmill to Leah Beatrice Miller (1904-1977), of Yarmouth, daughter of Henry Miller & Rose Pound. 

Arthur died on November 5, 1954 in Windsor, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, November 5, 1954:

BURIAL IN AYLMER FOR A. E. L. PARKES

AYLMER  – Arthur Ewart Learn Parkes, 223 Campbell Avenue, Windsor, died Friday morning in Metropolitan Hospital, Windsor in his 57th year.

Born at Kingsmill, he was a New York Central conductor on the Windsor division, and had resided for the past 30 years in Windsor.  He was a member of Calvary United Church, Windsor, and Springfield Masonic Lodge, 259.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Leah Beatrice (Miller) Parkers; on son, Harold Ewart Parkes, of Ancaster; a daughter, Mrs. Martin (Marjorie Dorothy) Young, of Windsor; three sisters, Mrs. William Sanders of London, Ont.; Mrs. George Jenkins, of Belmont; and Mrs. William LePage, of London, Ont.; as well as four grandchildren.

Resting at the Morris Windsor Chapel until Saturday, for service at 7:30 p.m., then to the Hughson Funeral Home, Sunday morning for service at 2:30 p.m. Monday. Rev. J. C. Wood, of Windsor, will officiate. Interment will be in Aylmer Cemetery.

Frank Lewis Parr

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Frank Parr was born on October 16, 1892 in Chadderton, Oldham, Lancashire, England, the son of Louis & Ellen Parr.  The family is found on the 1901 England census living at 14 Windsor Road, Oldham, Lancashire.

Frank emigrated to Canada about 1911 and settled in Bayham township, where he is found on the 1911 census living with Beecher & Ella Nolls, as a labourer. Passenger lists show a Frank Parr, age 18, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Hesperian, arriving at Halifax on March 4, 1911.  His intended occupation in Canada is a farm labourer.

Frank was farming in Richmond when he enlisted for service on March 7, 1916 in St. Thomas. He names his next of kin as his mother, Ellen Parr, of 1 Marmaduke, Oldham, Lancs, England.

Passenger lists show a Frank Parr returning to Canada in 1920, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Corsican, and arriving in Quebec on July 12.  The record indicates that he originally emigrated to Canada in 1911 and had lived in Bayham.

No further information can be found.

Arthur Edwin Parry

Arthur Parry’s name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna.  In all probability, this is Arthur Edwin Parry, who was a farmer living in Bayham when he was married on December 11, 1923 in Vienna to Lydia Pope, (1886-1976), a native of Wales, the daughter of Edwin Pope & Mary J. Durnell.  Arthur was also a native of Wales, and was the son of Edwin Parry & Emma E. Price.

It appears that Arthur’s service in the war was not in a Canadian regiment.  British records show an Arthur Edwin Parry, service number 1185, serving with the 1st Welsh Brigade, R.F.A.  He enlisted on February 1, 1915 and was discharged on April 14, 1916 due to sickness.  Arthur’s marker in Forest Lawn cemetery states he was a Sergeant in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

Canadian passenger lists record an Arthur Parry, age 39, a native of Wales, emigrating to Canada and arriving on March 24, 1920 at St. John, New Brunswick.  He was a farmer and his destination was Ontario.  A notation beside his name states “Imperial Army Man”.  The record also states that he had been in Canada in 1906.  A further search of the passenger lists revealed an entry for Arthur E. Parry, age 20, a railway clerk, emigrating from Monmouth, arriving on May 12, 1902 at Montreal. His destination was Toronto. It appears he returned to his home where he enlisted.

He and his family are found on the 1901 census in Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England, living at the Railway Station house.  His father, Edwin, was the railway station master, and was a native of Panteg, Monmouth, Wales.  His wife Emma E., was born in Stanton on Wye, Hereford.  Son Arthur E. was born at Treverthen, Monmouth.  Another son William was born in Usk, Monmouth.

Arthur died on October 24, 1968 at the age of 83.  He and his wife Lydia are buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens, London.  His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, October 25, 1968:

PARRY – At Westminster Hospital on Thursday, October 24, 1968, Arthur Edwin Parry, of 20 Norian Ave., in his 84th year.  Beloved husband of Lydia (Pope) and dear father of Mrs. W. Donald (Elsie) Nickles, London; and dear grandfather of Barry. Resting at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James St. at Richmond, where the funeral service will be conducted on Saturday, October 26 at 10:30 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.

 

William David Parsons

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The name “Wm. David Parsons” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Aylmer

William David Parsons was born on April 15, 1895 in London, England, the son of William David Parsons & Bertha Elizabeth Ash, who were married in London in 1891.

William David Parsons was living in Ingersoll, employed as a munitions inspector when he was married on May 22, 1916 to Annabel Roberts (1893-1921), of Copenhagen, the daughter of Frederick Ernest Roberts & Emma Cecelia Jones.

He was a machinist living at 80 Charles Street, Ingersoll, when he enlisted for service on June 2, 1917 in London.  He had served two years in the Essex Yeomanry (in England).  He names his wife Annabel as his next of kin.

Annabel is buried in Aylmer cemetery with her parents. Her obituary states that she and her husband moved to Bowmanville in 1919, but due to ill health she moved back to Aylmer.  She was survived by her husband and two children, Harold and Joan.

No further information is known.

William James Partlow

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William Partlow was born on September 14, 1876 in Vienna, the son of James J. Partlow (1830-1898) & Margaret Ann Scanlan (1837-1917). James is buried in Light Cemetery (no marker), and Margaret died at lot 8, concession 6, Dereham Township, and  is buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna. She was the daughter of James Scanlan & Susan Starkweather.

William and his wife Ida May were living at Mount Elgin where he was a carpenter when he enlisted for service on February 5, 1916 in Tillsonburg.

William died on September 26, 1945 and is buried with his wife Ida May (1878-1955) in Light Cemetery, Bayham Township.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 26, 1945:

WILLIAM J. PARTLO REMOVED BY DEATH

Tillsonburg Loses One of its Prominent Citizens

TILLSONBURG, Sept. 26 – William James Partlo, a well-known and respected resident of Tillsonburg for 32 years and for many years in the general contracting business, died on Wednesday morning, in his 70th year. Mr. Partlo was widely known throughout the Tillsonburg district.

Surviving are his wife; three daughters, Mrs. Harry Woods, Tillsonburg; Mrs. Harvey Cornell, London, Ont.; and Mrs. Arthur Cornell, Niagara Falls, Ont.; five sons, James, Ernest, William Jr., and Mack Partlo, all of Tillsonburg; and Don Partlo of London, Ont.; and three sisters, Mrs. Bud Johnson, Port Burwell, and Mrs. Ronson Weeks and Mrs. Olive Byse, Tillsonburg.

The funeral service is being held at the H. A. Ostrander and Son Funeral Home, Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Rev. Mr. Emmons will conduct the service. Interment in the Light Cemetery.

Clarence Partridge

Clarence Partridge appears in a photograph in the Aylmer Express, November 22, 1972, honoring veterans at the Aylmer Legion.  It is not known if he had lived in Aylmer at one time.  He died on July 2, 1988 in St. Thomas and is buried in Elmdale Cemetery.  His obituary was found in the files at the Elgin Military Museum:

CLARENCE E. PARTRIDGE

Clarence E. Partridge, of 209 Erie Street, St. Thomas, passed away Saturday, July 2, 1988 at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. He was 89. Born Sept. 1, 1898, in Suffolk, England, son of the late Francis and Maude (Mattock) Partridge, Mr. Partridge was a retired maintenance employee of Merlin Motors in the city having moved to St. Thomas from England about 1955.

He was an adherent of St. Luke’s Anglican Church. He was a life member of the Royal Order of Buffalos in England who served in the First World War with the British Army and in the Second World War with the Civil Defense.

Husband of the late Alice (Parnell) Partridge (Sept. 24, 1972), Mr. Partridge is survived by a daughter Patricia Mauer and her husband Emil, of 330 Wellington Street, St. Thomas, and a son Capt. Tony E. (Tom) Partridge and his wife Helen, in New Zealand.  Mr. Partridge was the last surviving member of his own immediate family.  Also survived by six grandchildren, Geoffrey, Halina, Wendy Jean, Philip, Lesley and Craig, and three great grandchildren Jaye, Troy and Justin. He was predeceased by a great granddaughter Melissa.

Resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, St. Thomas for funeral services Tuesday at 11 a.m., with Rev. James Broadfoot officiating. Visitation today, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Following cremation, burial at Elmdale Memorial Park. Remembrances to the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Foundation.

Samuel Clarke Paupst

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Clarke Paupst was born on January 14, 1898 in Aylmer, the son of Charles Paupst (1860-1906) & Mary Emeline Pero (1864-1933).  Charles was the son of Benjamin Paupst & Martha Ault, and was a tailor living in Aylmer when he was married there on January 6, 1887 to Mary Emeline Pero, also of Aylmer, the daughter of Nicholas Pero & Mary Wismer.  After Charles’ death, Mary was married in 1908 to Frederick F. Garner.  Charles & Mary are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Clarke was a farmer living at R. R. #1 Kingsmill when he enlisted for service on April 10, 1916 in London. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on June 13.

Following the war, he was living in Lindsay, Ontario employed as a baker when he was married there on June 28, 1922 to Laura Ann Barker (1903-1982), also of Lindsay, the daughter of Abraham Barker & Ellen Black.

Clarke & Laura had at least three children: Velma (born 1923 at Bexley, Victoria County), Marvin (1924) and Kenneth (1927).

When his mother died in 1933, Clarke was living in Niagara Falls, New York.

Clarke died on October 31, 1969 in Ontario.

 

Frederick Paupst

Frederick Paupst was born on March 22, 1893, the son of Charles Paupst (1860-1906) & Mary Emeline Pero (1864-1933).  Charles was the son of Benjamin Paupst & Martha Ault, and was a tailor living in Aylmer when he was married there on January 6, 1887 to Mary Emeline Pero, also of Aylmer, the daughter of Nicholas Pero & Mary Wismer.Fred Paupst  After Charles’ death, Mary was married in 1908 to Frederick F. Garner.  Charles & Mary are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Frederick was a baker, and had served in the 25th Regiment in St. Thomas.  His attestation paper bears no service number or date of enlistment, but he passed his medical exam on April 7, 1915 in Toronto.

A letter from Fred was printed in the Aylmer Express, December 14, 1916:

EVERYTHING O.K. ON THE WESTERN FRONT

Fred Paupst, in a letter to his mother, Mrs. Fred Garner, thanks her for parcels sent by herself and the Mother’s Union.

France, Nov. 24th, 1916

Dear Mother –
Just a few lines to let you know everything is all O.K. on the western front. I won’t have any time for a short while as we expect to be moving soon.  I received both of the parcels and everything was in good shape, especially that corn cob, which was the best of the bunch, and I see Jack had his name written on it.

We are having very cold weather just at present, but don’t think it will last long, or we will be short of water.  I am sorry to say that I won’t be home this Christmas, but if all goes well, I will be there in a couple of years. But save me the leg of the turkey and a couple of spare ribs.  Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,

I remain as ever, Fred.

Following the war, he continued his trade as a baker and was living in Milton, Ontario when he married on March 23, 1920 in Drumbo, Ontario to Emma McTague, of Milton, the daughter of James McTague & Mary Jane Trimbles. 

When his mother died in 1933, Frederick was living in Midland, Ontario.

Lloyd Edward Paupst

The name Lloyd Paupst is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.  Lloyd Paupst

Lloyd Edward Paupst was born on November 13, 1895 in Malahide, the son of Frank Paupst (1865-1925) & Jennie Carter (1867-1939).  Frank was born in Blenheim, the son of Benjamin & Martha Paupst, and was a tailor living in St. Thomas when he was married there on January 15, 1887 to Jennie Carter, a native of Aylmer living in St. Thomas, the daughter of Walter & Caroline Carter.  The family is found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Malahide.  Frank & Jennie later moved to Windsor and Amherstburg, but are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Lloyd moved to Michigan about 1912 where he was living at 86 Ferris, Highland Park, when he signed a US Draft Registration Card for the war. He was employed at the Ford Motor Co. in Highland Park as a tool and die maker.  His date of birth matches Ontario records, yet he states he was born in Texas.  This is obviously an error.

Lloyd’s return from overseas was reported in the Aylmer Express, February 6, 1919, with a photograph and the following caption:

“Sergt. Lloyd Paupst, son of Mr and Mrs Frank Paupst, of this place, who arrived home on Tuesday, direct from France. Sergt. Paupst enlisted in the American Army and was attached to the 97th aero squadron. He is the inventor of an improved attachment for the machine guns used on aeroplanes, which was adopted by the United States government. He has been engaged in France in instructing gunners in the use of the new attachment.”

Following the war, Lloyd returned to Aylmer, where he was employed as a machinist when he was married at New Sarum on April 26, 1923 to Jessie E. Howse, a native of Malahide, living in Yarmouth, the daughter of Frank Howse & Florence Arthur.

Following their marriage, Lloyd & Jessie lived on Woodward Avenue, Detroit. They are found on the 1930 census in Royal Oak, Michigan, with one daughter, Lois, age 3. When his mother died in 1939, Lloyd was living in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Lloyd died on April 4, 1966 in Belleville, Wayne County, Michigan in his 71st year.  His wife Jessie (born November 20, 1895) died in Ann Arbor in April 1984.

Lloyd’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 6, 1966:

LLOYD PAUPST

Lloyd Paupst of Belleville, Mich., died in hospital in Ann Arbor on Monday morning, April 4th, in his 71st year.  A brother of Harry Paupst of R.R. 1, Aylmer, he was born on a farm just east of Aylmer and attended High School here.  He was a retired fifty-year employee of the Ford firm in Detroit and also a 32nd degree Mason.  He is survived by his wife, the former Jessie Howse; one daughter, Mrs. Robert Dyer; and six grandchildren. The funeral was held this afternoon from the Gree Funeral Home in Ypsilanti.

James Payne

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James Payne was born on November 23, 1898 in Bristol, England, the son of James Payne.  He emigrated to Canada with Dr. Barnardo’s party as a “Home Child”, at the age of 11, leaving Liverpool on July 28, 1910 on the ship Tunisian, and arriving in Quebec on August 5, 1910. He went to live with Gable & Frances Winters in South Dorchester, where he appears with them on the 1911 census.

James was a farmer living at Springfield when he enlisted for service on April 10, 1917 in London.  He lists his next of kin as his grandmother, Mrs. Janet Payne, of 12 Crescent Ave., Bristol, England.

Following the war, James was employed as a machine hand in St. Thomas when he was married there on September 3, 1919 to Alice Viola Roloson (1901-1926), a native of Brownsville living in St. Thomas, the daughter of William Roloson & May Webber.  They were living at 41 Locust Street, St. Thomas in the 1920’s. They lost an infant son William (1925-1926), and Viola also died at a young age in 1926. They are both buried in Springfield cemetery. James was later married to Ruth Haviland.

James died on June 14, 1966 at the age of 67 and is also buried in Springfield cemetery.  A military monument with the following inscription marks his resting place:

“F. James Payne  Private 529112  C. A. M. C.  14 June 1966  aged 67″ 

His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 15, 1966:

J. PAYNE DIES IN HOSPITAL

The death of F. James Payne, of R.R. 6 Wallaceburg, and formerly of St. Thomas, occurred at Westminster Hospital, London, Ont., on Tuesday morning, following a lengthy illness. He was 67.

Born in England, he came to Canada at an early age and resided in Springfield for many years, prior to coming to St. Thomas. He went to Detroit as a tool and die maker and upon his retirement moved to the Wallaceburg district. He was a veteran of World War 1, and saw service in England and France.  Mr. Payne was a member of the Wallaceburg Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion. 

Surviving are his wife, the former Ruth Haviland, of R.R. 6 Wallaceburg; two daughters, Mrs. Glen (Virginia) Dean, Roseville, Mich.; and Mrs. Fred (Alice) Cowie, St. Thomas; one son, Ralph Payne, St. Thomas.  He was predeceased by a son, William Payne; his father-in-law, William Roloson, St. Thomas; his mother-in-law, Mrs. Reita Haviland, Wallaceburg; eight grandchildren and one great grandchild. 

At rest at the William Funeral Home and the funeral will take place from there on Thursday afternoon at two o’clock. Interment will be in Springfield cemetery.

Delmer Pearson

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Delmer Pearson was born on September 5, 1897 in Corinth, the son of John Hubbard Pearson (1872-1958) & Irene Thompson (1875-1938). John was born in Bayham, the son of Thomas & Serinda Pearson, and was a farmer there when he was married on October 22, 1894 in Tillsonburg to Irene (Alena) Thompson, also of Bayham, daughter of Seth & Laura Thompson.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Delmer was a farmer living at Corinth when he enlisted for service on June 5, 1918 in London.

Delmer was married to Rebecca I. Brinn (1904-1980).  He died in 1990 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.

Mahlon Penhale

335449  Mahlon Penhale

Mahlon Penhale was born on March 5, 1898 at Mapleton in Yarmouth, the son of Thomas Penhale & Minnie Ella McLarty (1868-1948).  Minnie was the daughter of Archie & Catherine McLarty.

Mahlon was a student living at 82 Gladstone Ave., St. Thomas with his mother when he enlisted for service on May 28, 1918 in Guelph.

He was married in 1935 to Annie Helen Field, daughter of J. G. Field, of Tavistock. Following their marriage, they lived at 8 Scott Street, St. Thomas.

Mahlon died on March 12, 1965 and is buried in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, accompanied by a photograph:

MAHLON PENHALE, RETIRED SHOE MERCHANT, PASSES

Mahlon Penhale, a well-known retired shoe merchant, of 32 Southwick Street, died Friday morning in the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital after a long illness. He had been retired since 1950.

Born in Mapleton, Mr. Penhale was a son of the late Thomas and Minnie Penhale, residents of North Yarmouth Township. He came to St. Thomas as a child and had lived most of his life here. For many years he operated shoe stores in St. Thomas and Aylmer in partnership with his brother, the late Frank Penhale. Their store in the city was located at 559 Talbot Street.

During World War I, Mr. Penhale saw active service with the 64th Battery of the Canadian Field Artillery.  A past master of St. David’s Masonic Lodge, No. 302 A.F. and A.M., he was also a member of Knox Presbyterian Church where he was a member of the board of managers for several years and a member of the Session. He was a member of the boards of both the Memorial Hospital and the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, serving as president of the former board in 1947-48.

Survivors include his wife, the former Helen Field; sister, Miss Melva Penhale, 82 Gladstone Avenue; brother Dr. Thomas Penhale, Detroit, Mich.; a niece, Mrs. Graham (Joan) Redfearn, Burlington, and a nephew, Thomas Penhale, Toronto.

Resting at the P. R. Williams and Son Funeral Home where service, conducted by Rev. Dr. H. S. Rodney, of Knox Presbyterian Church, will be held Monday at 2 p.m. Interment will be made in Elmdale Memorial Park Cemetery. 

Alfred Percival

Alfred Percival’s name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna.  The only record of a man by this name serving in the war was born in Devonshire, England on January 2, 1882.  His service number was 5994.  He was a teamster living in Hamilton when he enlisted for service on September 27, 1914 at Valcartier.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Mrs. A. Percival, of 32 Balmoral Ave., Shedoke Mountain, Hamilton.  

He is found on the 1911 census in Hamilton, with his wife Emily, also a native of England, who emigrated in 1908.

His connection to Bayham Township cannot be determined.

Henry Sylvanus Percy

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Henry Percy was born on February 13, 1895 at Copenhagen in Malahide, the son of Albert Edward Percy (1868-1956) & Palma Ann Reynolds (1876-1959).  Albert was born in Malahide, the son of Henry Percy & Mary Jane Backhouse, and was married on August 15, 1894 in St. Thomas to Palma Reynolds, also a native of Malahide, daughter of Sylvanus Reynolds & Nancy Gloin.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Henry was married on April 26, 1918 in London to Aleen Gunn (1897-1987) of Sparta, daughter of Eugene Gunn & Jane Foster.

Henry was a farmer living at Copenhagen when he enlisted for service on June 10, 1918 in London.

He died on June 23, 1975 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 25, 1975:

Henry S. Percy

Henry S. Percy of 60 Spruce Street, Aylmer died at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Monday, June 23rd.  He was 80 years of age.  Born at Copenhagen (Malahide Township) on February 13, 1895, he was a son of the late Albert Percy and Palma Reynolds. He lived in the Aylmer area all his life.

He operated a garage at Dunboyne for 11 years, then owned a farm implement dealership in Aylmer until he retired.  Mr. Percy had also farmed and was employed by the Township of Malahide as road superintendent for a few years.

He was a member of East Elgin Sportsmen’s Association since its formation in 1954 and was also a charter member of Sunny Side Hunt Club, founded in 1938. He was a member of Malahide United Church.

He is survived by his wife, the former Aleen Dunn; two daughters, Mrs. Hazel Liddle of RR 6 Aylmer, and Mrs. C. E. (Beatrice) Connor of RR 3 St. Thomas; four grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Funeral was held at H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home at 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 25th (today) conducted by Mr. Alfred Bowden of Malahide United Church. Burial was in Aylmer Cemetery.

Owen Orville Percy

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Owen Orville Percy was born on April 16, 1895 at Copenhagen in Malahide, the son of Frank Bertrand Percy (1865-1939) & Mary Jane Reynolds (1867-1928). Frank Percy was the son of Henry Percy & Mary Jane Backhouse, and his wife Mary was the daughter of Sylvenus & Nancy Reynolds.  They farmed on lot 15 & 16, concession 2 Malahide before moving to the Belmont area about 1908. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Owen was a farmer in South Dorchester when he was married on November 28, 1917 in Malahide to Lila Glyde Welter (1897-1974), of Malahide, the daughter of John Welter & Mary Drysdale.

Owen’s address was R. R. #1 Belmont when he enlisted for service on June 10, 1918.

Owen & Glyde had three children: Mary Edith (1918-1925); Helen May (1921) and Donald Drysdale (1931). There may also have been two other infant children, Owen (died 1923) and Margie (died 1932), who are buried with Owen in Aylmer cemetery.  Owen & Glyde  moved to Commanda in Northern Ontario in the early 1920’s.  Owen returned to South Dorchester where he was living at lot 15, concession 8 in the 1940’s.  

Owen died at St. Thomas Elgin-General Hospital on June 12, 1980 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in  the Aylmer Express, June 18, 1980:

Owen Orville Percy

Owen Orville Percy, 85, of R.R. #1 Belmont died Thursday, June 12 at St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital.  Mr. Percy was born in Malahide Township on April 16, 1895. He farmed in South Dorchester Township for most of his life.  He was an avid hunter and fisherman.  Surviving are son, Donald of Aylmer, and daughter, Mrs. Harold (Helen) Parker of Erieau;sisters, Mrs. Versa Taylor of Aylmer and Mrs. Jennie Walter of St. Thomas; six grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.  The funeral was held Saturday, June 14 from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home with Rev. Elgin Rintoul of Belmont officiating.  Burial was made in Aylmer cemetery.  The pallbearers were John Drabick, James Wilson, Lewis Helkaa, Raymond Lucas, Stan Drabick and Bill Shackelton.

Marshall Harry Perry

3137831  Harry Perry

Marshall Harry Perry was born on March 12, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of William James Perry (1871-1943) & Ruth Berdan (1874-1945).  William was the son of James Perry of Jaffa.  Ruth was the daughter of Jacob Berdan & Lucinda Hunter, of Malahide.

He was a farmer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 10, 1918 in London.

An article about Harry appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 18, 1918:

PRESENTATION TO PTE. HARRY PERRY

Last Friday evening about one hundred of the friends and neighbors of Pte. Harry Perry met at the home of his parents, Mr and Mrs Wm. Perry, to bid him farewell ‘ere he leaves for overseas with a draft from London.  On behalf of those present, Mr. E. Witty presented Pte. Perry with a substantial purse as a slight token of the esteem in which the young man is held. Pte. Perry made a neat and feeling reply stating that he was pleased to serve his country in this national crisis.

Addresses were made by E. Witty, Chas. Stokes, of Jaffa, a returned soldier, Chas. Gunstone and A. L. Caverly. A dainty lunch was served by the ladies. After singing the national anthem and wishing Pte. Perry good luck and a safe return, the gathering dispersed.

Harry returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on September 19. He was married on December 24, 1921 at Yarmouth Centre to Irene Tompkins (1904-1974), of Yarmouth, daughter of Lawrence Tompkins & Eva Lee.

Marshall Harry Perry died on August 27, 1958 in St. Thomas,  and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, August 28, 1958:

MARSHALL H. PERRY, 61, DIES SUDDENLY

Marshall H. Perry, 61, of 13 Yarwood street, passed away at his residence, on Wednesday evening. Although not in the best of health for the past three years his death was the result of a sudden heart attack. Born in Aylmer on March 12, 1897, he was a well-known Wabash Railway fireman who retired due to ill health.  A resident of St. Thomas for the past 17 years, he had resided in Malahide Township and Aylmer previously. Mr. Perry was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers No. 132.

A son of the late Ruth Berdan and William Perry, he is survived by his wife, Mrs. Irene (Tompkins) Perry, of 13 Yarwood street; a son, Elgin Perry, of St. Thomas; a daughter, Mrs. Joseph (Hazel) Zaleski, St. Huberts, Que.; a brother, Harley Perry of RR 4 St. Thomas; two sisters, Mrs. Clarence Garton, of RR 8 St. Thomas; and Mrs. Harry Tribe, of Union; one grandchild, Janice Zaleski, of St. Huberts, Que.

Resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home but other details of the funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Louis Francis Gordon Pettit

2626880

Louis Francis Pettit was born on August 3, 1893 in the Dunboyne district of Malahide, the son of Thomas Pettit & Margaret Catherine Campbell.  Thomas was born about 1848 in Delaware Township, Middlesex Co., the son of Martin & Elizabeth Pettit, and was living in Yarmouth when he was married on February 11, 1869 in Fingal to Margaret Catherine Campbell, born about 1848 in Yarmouth, the daughter of John & Ann Campbell.  She was living in Yarmouth at the time of her marriage.  Thomas & Margaret moved to Belvedere Township, Montcalm Co., Michigan about 1894 where they farmed (1900 census).  On the 1910 census, Thomas is a house carpenter living in Grand Ledge City, Eaton Co., Michigan.

Louis Francis Gordon Pettit enlisted for service on September 24, 1917 in London.  He was a labourer, not married, and living at 629 West Maple Street, Lansing, Michigan.  He lists his next of kin as his mother, at the name address.

Following the war, he was married on July 26, 1919 in Ledge, Eaton County, Michigan to Hazel Minnie Luce (1901-1991), a native of Fenwick, Ionia County, Michigan.  They had the following children: Marvin Victor, Charlotte Sybil, Weltha Mae, Leland Alfred, Cornelius Thomas and Gerald Lewis Gordon.  Hazel and the children are found on the 1930 census in Lansing, Michigan.  Louis is not enumerated with them.

No further information is known.

Frederick Petty

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Frederick Petty was born on November 6, 1896 in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. He is found on the 1901 England census in Portsmouth as a “pauper” living at the Workhouse Infirmary.  He emigrated to Canada with Dr. Barnardo’s party as a “Home Child”, at the age of 8, leaving Liverpool on August 3, 1906 on the ship Dominion, and arriving in Quebec on August 11, 1906.  He went to live with Lyman & Emma Corless of South Dorchester where he is found with them on the 1911 census.

Frederick was a teamster living at RR #1 Springfield when he enlisted for service on October 12, 1917 in Toronto.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Emily Petty, of 35 High Street, Portsmouth, England.

No further information is known.

Arthur Lewis Phelps

Arthur Phelps was born on April 24, 1900 in Malahide Township, the son of Lewis Lafayette Phelps (1858-1899) & Martha Ann Abell (1861-1941).  Lewis was born in Malahide, the son of Daniel & Emily Phelps, and was farming there when he was married on February 14, 1883 in Malahide to Martha Abell, also of Malahide, the daughter of Robert & Mary Abell.  Lewis & Martha are buried in Burdick Cemetery.

No attestation paper can be found for Arthur.  His name is found in the Book of Remembrance, and it states he was a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force. He enlisted in March 1918, and was discharged in February 1919.  He no doubt enlisted in England.

Following the war, Arthur became a dentist and moved to Grimsby about 1924.  He was living at 57 Main Street West, Grimsby, when he died on March 8, 1929 in his 29th year. He is buried with his parents in Burdick cemetery.

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 14, 1929:

ARTHUR L. PHELPS, GRIMSBY DENTIST, BURIED HERE

Son of Mrs. Martha Phelps, of Seville

Dr. Arthur L. Phelps, popular young dentist of Grimsby, Ont., died on Friday, March 8th, after an illness of only a few days, caused from septic poisoning.  The late Dr. Phelps was born in Elgin County and was in his 29th year. He was a son of Mrs. Martha Phelps of Seville, and attended the Aylmer High School and Woodstock College. From Woodstock College, he enlisted and went overseas with the Royal Air Force. Following the war, Mr. Phelps graduated from the Ontario College of Dental Surgery at Toronto, and went to Grimsby in 1924, taking over the practice of Dr. William Carson. During his five years there he had taken a very active part in all amateur sports, being Past President of Lincoln County Hockey League, coach of the Grimsby High School Rugby Team, and the basketball team; also a member of the badminton club and the Deer Park Golf and Country Club. Up to the time of his death he was an active member of the Hamilton Aero Club. In politics Dr. Phelps was a Conservative and in religion a Baptist.

Surviving are his mother, Mrs. Martha Phelps, Aylmer RR 1; three sisters, Mrs. F. L. Truman, Aylmer; Mrs. (Dr.) C. M. Truman, of Winnipeg; Mrs. George Laidlaw, Aylmer; and one brother, Ward Phelps, also of Aylmer.

The remains were brought to Aylmer and the funeral service was held from the home of his mother on Monday, March 11th, at 2 p.m. Rev. H. E. Allen, pastor of the Baptist church, had charge, and was assisted by Rev. J. C. Dunlop. During the service Mrs. George Orton, of Richmond, sang a solo. The pallbearers were Ward and Arthur Benner, Will Abel, George Laidlaw, F. L. Truman and Fred Rogers. Interment was made in the family plot in the Burdick cemetery.

Victor Brock Phelps

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Victor Phelps was born on June 20, 1898 in Aylmer, the son of Walter John Phelps (1861-1935) & Elsie (Ella) Nevada Learn.  Walter was born in Dereham Township, the son of David & Bessie Phelps, and was a bookkeeper living in Dereham when he was married on June 11, 1889 in Glencolin to Ella Learn, a native of Malahide, daughter of Jacob E. & Sarah Learn.  Walter & Ella later moved to the Montreal area, where they are found on the 1911 census in Westmount, Hochelge, Quebec.

Victor Phelps was a munition worker living with his parents at 9 Lorraine Ave., Westmount, when he enlisted for service on October 14, 1916 in Montreal. He enlisted with the 79th Depot Battery, C.E.F.

When his father died in 1935, Dr. Victor Phelps was living in Montreal.

Walter S. Phelps

The name “Walter S. Phelps” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Aylmer.

Walter Scaling Phelps was born on November 28, 1896  in Aylmer, the son of Walter John Phelps (1861-1935) & Elsie (Ella) Nevada Learn.  Walter Sr. was born in Dereham Township, the son of David & Bessie Phelps, and was a bookkeeper living in Dereham when he was married on June 11, 1889 in Glencolin to Ella Learn, a native of Malahide, daughter of Jacob E. & Sarah Learn.  Walter & Ella later moved to the Montreal area, where they are found on the 1911 census in Westmount, Hochelge, Quebec.

No attestation paper can be found for Walter. He became a doctor, and was married on October 18, 1917 to Clara Constance Irwin.

Passenger lists show a Walter S. Phelps, age 22, returning from overseas on August 9, 1919, arriving in Quebec.  His destination was Montreal.  His occupation is given as student, and the list indicates he is returning as part of the military.

When his father died in 1935, Dr. Walter Phelps was living in Montreal.

Ward Abell Phelps

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The name Ward Phelps is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Ward Abell Phelps was born on October 3, 1895 in Dereham Township, Oxford County, the son of Lewis Lafayette Phelps (1858-1899) & Martha Ann Abell (1861-1941).  Lewis was born in Malahide, the son of Daniel & Emily Phelps, and was farming there when he was married on February 14, 1883 in Malahide to Martha Abell, also of Malahide, the daughter of Robert & Mary Abell.  Lewis & Martha are buried in Burdick Cemetery.

Ward Phelps was farming at R.R. #1 Aylmer with his mother when he enlisted for service on January 4, 1918 in London.

He was married in 1929 to Barbara Kathleen Clarke (1902-1974).  He died on December 19, 1981 at the age of 86, and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.

 His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 23, 1981:

WARD PHELPS

Ward Abel Phelps, 86, of 94 Fourth Ave., Aylmer, a former public school board trustee and a former director of the old Aylmer and Malahide Telephone Company died at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, St. Thomas, Saturday, December 19.

Mr. Phelps was a retired farmer who lived most of his life in Aylmer and Malahide Township. He was a member of Malahide Masonic Lodge Number 140 AF & AM.  He was born in Dereham Township, October 3, 1895.

Mr. Phelps is survived by his sons Thomas of Aylmer and John of St. Thomas, and a granddaughter Catherine Phelps.  He was the last surviving member of his family.

He was predeceased by his parents Lewis and Martha (Abel) Phelps, his wife Barbara (Clarke) Phelps.

A funeral service was conducted from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Monday, December 21 with the Rev. John Bunner of Aylmer Baptist Church.

 

George Willoughby Gordon Philpott

201882  Gordon Philpott

Gordon Philpott was born on January 2, 1885 in Denmead, Hampshire, England, the son of Other Philpott & Eleanor Deverall (1848-1895).  The family is found on the 1891 census at Closewood House, Hambledon, Hampshire.  Other Philpott was born about 1840 in Severn Stoke, Worcester, while his wife Eleanor was born in Cork, Ireland.  By the 1901 census, Other is a widower living with his children at Colehill, Dorset, a retired civil servant.

Gordon emigrated to Canada and settled at lot 19, concession Malahide in the Grovesend area.  He was married in Aylmer on April 22, 1912 to Amy Muriel Bobbett, of Grovesend, the daughter of Stephen James Bobbett & Eliza Brown.

Gordon moved from Grovesend to Toronto in the fall of 1915, and was living at 52 Columbine Ave., Toronto when he enlisted for service on November 3, 1915 in Toronto. 

Gordon returned to his wife in Toronto from the war on February 5, 1919, landing in Halifax. Following the war, Mr & Mrs Philpott returned to the Grovesend area where they spent the remainder of their lives. They celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1962. Gordon died on April 24, 1977, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery

  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 27, 1977:

GORDON PHILPOTT

Gordon Philpott of RR 2 Aylmer, died at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Sunday, April 24, 1977 following a long illness. He was 92 years of age.  Mr. Philpott was born in Closewood, England on January 2, 1885.  After moving to Canada, he lived in Malahide Township for most of his life and was a retired general farmer.  During World War I, Mr. Philpott was s Sergeant in the 95th Battalion.

He is survived by his wife, the former Muriel Bobbett; one son, Simon Philpott of Sarnia; one daughter, Mrs. Jack (Dorothy) Garton of Aylmer; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Eight brothers and sisters died previously.

The funeral service was held at H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Tuesday, April 26, conducted by the Rev. Robert Scott of Malahide United Church. Burial was in Aylmer cemetery.

Charles Henry Picknell

189429  Charles Picknell

Charles Picknell was born on February 9, 1868 in Brighton, Sussex, England, the son of James Picknell & Charlotte Mason. Charles was first married to Fanny Wilson (1870-1898)  in Sussex in 1891 and they had one daughter, Daisy May.  Following Fanny’s death in 1898, Charles was remarried in 1903 to Mabel Flora Duffield (1875-1943) , daughter of Walter Duffield, in Sussex.

Passenger lists show a Charles Picknell, born about 1868, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Virginian arriving in Halifax on April 6, 1912. The record indicates he is married and is a decorator.  It states his destination is Vancouver. No record can be found when his wife joined him in Canada.

Charles & Mabel eventually settled in Aylmer, where he was a house decorator.  He enlisted for service on November 18, 1915 in Aylmer.  He was a member of the 30th Battery C.F.A., and in England had served in the 1st Battery Royal Sussex Regiment; 2nd V.B.R. West Surrey Regiment and the 5th Battery Royal West Surrey Territorial Forces, for which he was awarded a long service medal.

Passenger lists of returning soldiers show a Charles Picknell arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on March 17, 1918.  No service number is given in the record.

Charles died on May 16, 1958 in St. Thomas, and is buried with his wife Mabel in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary, accompanied by a photograph, appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, May 17, 1958:

CHARLES H. PICKNELL DIES, 91ST BATTALION VETERAN

Charles Henry Picknell, veteran member of the 91st Battalion Association, died on Friday evening at Westminster Hospital, London. Mr. Picknell was in his 92nd year.

Mr. Picknell had been in Westminster Hospital for the past seven or eight years, but his death followed a week of illness resulting from a fractured hip.

Born in England, Mr. Picknell began his soldiering career as a young man of 18, long before the Boer War of 1888.  In the Boer War he served as a sergeant musketry instructor. Coming to Canada in 1912, Mr. Picknell went to the Canadian West where he worked as a painter and decorator before coming to Ontario where he settled in Aylmer and operated his own painting and decorating business until retiring and coming to live with his daughter, Mrs. Gordon “Daisy” Frank, of 91 Dunkirk Drive, about 15 years ago.

Mr. Picknell was the oldest member of the 91st Battalion Association and went overseas with it. He was a past president of the Aylmer Branch of the Canadian Legion and a member of Trinity Church, Aylmer.

Mr. Picknell was the son of the late James Picknell and Charlotte Mason, and the husband of the late Mrs. Flora May (Duffield) Picknell, who died many years ago.

He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. Gordon Frank, of Dunkirk drive; a brother in Brighton, England, and seven grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren.

Resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home until Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock when the funeral service will be conducted by Rev. R. W. Lane of St. John’s Anglican church. Interment will be in Aylmer Cemetery. The Canadian Legion will assist in the service.

James Herbert Gillett Pickston

52310  Jim Pickston

James Pickston was born on April 3, 1898 in Altrincham, Cheshire, England, the son James Pickston & Alice Maria Gillett.  The family is found on the 1901 census at 16 Regent Road, Altrincham, Cheshire.

James enlisted under age for service at Ashton-u-Lynne in England on Dec. 7, 1915 and was a Private in the Liverpool Regiment.  He was awarded a Victory Medal for his service.

He emigrated to Canada in 1922 and settled in St. Thomas. Later in life, he moved to Aylmer to live with his daughter.  In 1987 he was presented with a 60-year membership by the Royal Canadian Legion in Aylmer and St. Thomas.

Mr. Pickston was interviewed by the Aylmer Express in 1987, and the article was printed in the November 11th  edition:

FIRST GREAT WAR – 

A WHOLE GENERATION KILLED

“I hope the children of today have nothing to compare with the First World War – I hope there’s not a third”, said Jim Pickston, of Aylmer, who fought with the British Army from 1916 to the Armistice on November 11, 1918.

He was born and raised at Altrincham, England, and enlisted on December 7, 1915 while he was 17 years old.  He was called up to service on his 18th birthday, April 3, 1916 and joined the King’s Liverpool Regiment as a private.

Mr. Pickston said when he enlisted there was a great wave of patriotism sweeping England. Any able man who didn’t join up was an outcast. He added that he wanted to volunteer and not be conscripted.

He trained at Blackpool, England for three months. Training involved physical exercise, leaning how to use a rifle and bayonet to kill, use of hand grenades and general equipment instruction. Mr. Pickston said even at that point, “I had no idea what I was getting into”. He was young at the time, the age of many of today’s senior high school students.

When training was complete, they were shipped to France and Belgium from Southampton. At Etaples, France, Mr. Pickston did his final training. Very shortly he was on his way to the front lines.

At that time the battle was just starting to break at Neuve Eglise, near Ypres, Belgium. Before long the battle was underway in earnest. The living conditions were terrible, and mud was everywhere, he said, adding the stench was bad, and soldiers were plagued by rats and lice.

Mr. Pickston explained that the trenches were just deep enough to allow soldiers to get their heads out of the line of fire. Small shelves were dug into the walls to allow for sleeping quarters, since British soldiers spent four days in the front lines and four days off.  “You just slept in the mud or rain”.  Rations were delivered at night, and usually the quarter-master brought hot soup with him. The rest of the food had to be heated on bunsen burners whenever there was a chance.  Mr. Pickston said the trenches were the front line. Allied soldiers were separated from the German trenches by a “no man’s land”, that was strung with barbed wire to impede advances.

And when the soldiers were ordered out of the trenches in an advance it meant death for most.  Mr. Pickston got his first dose of hand to hand combat just two weeks after arriving at the front lines. Like many other battle experienced war veterans, he was unwilling to speak of this in detail.  His unit was moved to Beaumont-Hamel during the Battle of the Somme.  On November 13, 1916, Mr. Pickston took a bullet in the leg during battle, and was shipped back to England where he spent two months in hospital. He was then sent back to the war. While in hospital, Mr.Pickston heard the zepplins used by the Germans to drop bombs on England.

In 1917, Mr. Pickston returned to Belgium, fighting at Passchendaele, in Flanders, an area known for its mud, and the number of soldiers killed.  Mr. Pickston described being in a battle at Polygon Wood during the attack on Passchendaele by the allies.

It was November, and raining hard.  “As we got up to go over the top (of the trenches) they (Germans) started with machine guns. Oh boy, they just slaughtered us”.  It was just “bodies and mud”, he said. “A human being didn’t have a chance. Human flesh was nothing”, as he  watched the friends he bunked with, chopped down by the German artillery and bullets.

During the fight, Mr. Pickston said he fell in a large shell hole full of water. “Next thing I knew there were my buddies, just bombed to pieces. There wasn’t one left”.  Later he found out six had actually survived, but at the time, he thought he was the only one.  He said he buried himself in the mud.  “I don’t know whether I was scared or what it was. I just kept repeating to myself, ‘O Lord I don’t want to die…I’m too young…I don’t want to die. Save me’.  I just kept repeating it. Eventually everything was quiet”.

He looked around, “I couldn’t see a soul”, then got up and started back towards the British lines. After a while he lay down in a shell hole, looked up into the sun and thought about how he could get back to his unit.  Again he looked around, and this time saw a bunch of German soldiers coming over a crest. “And I though, oh, oh, I’m finished”.  But it turned out that they were prisoners being led back by two British soldiers, so Mr. Pickston joined them.

He said he wondered at the time and even to this day, “How did I ever get out of it”.  Mr. Pickston said the generals treated infantry as cannon fodder.  “The generals didn’t care for us as humans”.  If 200 men were killed, 200 more were put in their place. They would gain ten yards with thousands of lives lost – “it wasn’t worth a hoot”. “A whole generation was wiped out in the first world war”.

The battles were “just a mass of mud, and human beings, and mules and artillery – all stuck in the mud”. The battles were “nothing but dead bodies and stench”.  Many of the dead weren’t killed by the enemy at all, he said. “A lot of the soldiers just fell in shell holes that were full of water, and they’d try and scramble out” But the slick mud made escape impossible and, “they just slithered down and drowned”.  “It seems a shame that all these thousands and thousands and thousands of lives – men were nothing, (slaughtered) just to take a few yards of mud. What good did it do. They’d (Germans) take it back again, maybe in a week and they maybe lost thousands of men over a few yards of mud….and it had no value at all”.

Following Polygon Woods, Mr. Pickston was sent for training on the Lewis gun, a type of light machine gun. He said it would only fire a few rounds before it got too hot, and quit working.  In April 1918, Mr. Pickston was on the front lines at Meteren, also near Ypres. At that time the Germans were making a big push, and pushed the allies back almost to Paris, he said. The trenches at Meteren were makeshift, what Mr. Pickston called “six-foot blobs”.  On April 18, 1918 there were eight men in his crew, all in a six-foot long trench. “I was a number one Lewis gunner then”.  “I looked to the left, and I saw a German jump out of a trench further along our line. He had a pot masher, and a pot masher in the German army was a kind of hand grenade”. The German threw it at Mr. Pickston’s trench, but missed, and was killed by one of the crew.  It wasn’t much longer before the crew knew it wouldn’t get out alive. The eight men talked about their situation, said a prayer together, “and we walked toward the German lines with our hands raised. There was no other choice”. He said they didn’t know if they would be killed on the way over, but they made it.  First the Germans traded boots with the men. He explained that the British had better boots than the Germans. Next his service revolver was taken, and he was interrogated by a German officer. “Then we just milled about until they decided what to do with us”.  Mr. Pickston and his crew were never taken to Germany. They were shipped to Lille, Belgium and put to work. As prisoners of war, the men pulled up railroad tracks, and laid them again, and just cleaned up in general. Mr. Pickston was then asked if he had ever repaired shoes.  “I thought that would be a nice, soft, cushy job, so I told them yes”. He didn’t know how to do it.  He was taken to a building where Germans were repairing shoes. They used wooden plugs to attach soles to the uppers. Mr. Pickston said the Germans got a kick out of him breaking the wooden pegs. “I was the worst workman”, but he eventually learned how to do it.

Rations were slim for both POW’s and Germans, Mr. Pickston said. “I call them slops”.  The prisoners got a quarter loaf of bread a day, and if it wasn’t eaten in the morning, someone would steal it.  One of the Germans in the shoe factory often saved some of his soup and gave it to Mr. Pickston. The prisoners weren’t kept in a camp. They were moved from village to village. Sleeping quarters were usually barns they had to clean out before using. Mr. Pickston said towards the end of the war, blockades of the sea lanes by the allied navies played a big role in the German defeat. He could see the Germans weren’t getting enough to eat, and the “discipline was going”.

On Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the prisoners were just allowed to walk away.  Mr. Pickston walked from Lille to the Dutch Frontier, where he was refused entry because he had no identification papers. So he walked back to Brussels and eventually got back to England with the British troops. After two days in England he was on his own again. There wasn’t much employment, he said, but he was lucky to find a part-time job.

In 1922 he came to Canada, settling in St. Thomas, where he worked with the railway.  Mr. Pickston now lives with his daughter and son-in-law Olive and Ken Williamson in Aylmer. He said up until a few years ago, he marched in every Armistice Day parade. The memories of the First Great War were very private, he said, and he hadn’t talked about his experience much.  But now he would like everyone to know how devastating a war can be, in hopes that the younger generation could prevent it from ever happening again. For that reason he did a video taped interview with the Elgin Military Museum in 1983.  The tape is shown in area schools.

The First Great War was supposed to be the war to end all wars, Mr. Pickston said, but it wasn’t too long until the Second Great War came along. Both of those drew one country after another into the fight, with tremendous loss of lives. And, “every war that comes along, more civilians are killed”.  Mr. Pickston said, “I was lucky. There were thousands and thousands that were unlucky”.  “I hope the children of today don’t have to go through what I did”.

James died on May 14, 1994 and is buried with his wife Doris (1903-1976) in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, May 16, 1994:

PICKSTON

At St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, Saturday, May 14, 1994, James Herbert Gillett Pickson, 48 Warren Street, Aylmer, and formerly of 10 New Street, St. Thomas, in his 97th year. Husband of the late Mrs. Doris (Stacey) Pickston (1976). Father of Mrs. Olive Williamson and her husband Kenneth of Aylmer, and Donald Pickston and his wife Lily of St. Catharines. Also survived by 7 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren.  Mr. Pickston was predeceased by a sister and 4 brothers. Friends will be received at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, St. Thomas, on Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m., and where the funeral and committal service will be conducted Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. Private interment in Elmdale Memorial Park, St. Thomas. A Legion Memorial Service will be conducted at the funeral home on Monday at 7 p.m. by the officers and members of Lord Elgin Branch #41, Royal Canadian Legion, and a Masonic Memorial Service will be conducted at 8:30 p.m. by the officers and members of Talbot Lodge #546 A.F. & A.M. Memorial donations to Shrine Hospitals for Crippled Children or charity of one’s choice gratefully acknowledged.

William Ross Pierce

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William Pierce was born on November 11, 1899, the son of Aquila W. Pierce (1864-1949) & Katharine M. Laur (1866-1961).  Aquila was born at Clear Creek in Houghton Township, the son of William & Mary Pierce, and was a livery stable keeper in Aylmer when he was married on May 26, 1886 in St. Thomas to Katharine Laur, a native of Malahide living in Aylmer, daughter of Levi Laur & Mary Bearss.

William was a student living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on March 9, 1917 in Windsor, with the 241st O.S. Battalion, C.E.F.

Pte. R. Pierce returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 30.

He was married on April 29, 1919 in Salford, Oxford County, to Doris Smith, of Tillsonburg, daughter of John Smith & Mary Schooley.

William Pierce operated a furniture store and undertaking business in Aylmer,  in partnership with Ray C. Clement.  They dissolved their partnership in 1921, and W. R. Pierce continued the business until he sold to E. E. Atkinson in 1926.  

When his mother died in 1961, William Ross Pierce was living in Sudbury, Ontario.

Percival Godfrey Pineo

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Percival Pineo was born on September 30, 1898 in Malahide or Yarmouth, the son of Henry Bradley Pineo (1880-1938) & Alice Maud Bennett Godfrey (1881-1953).  Henry was born in Malahide, the son of George Pineo & Emily Bradley, and was married on April 13, 1897 in Malahide to Alice Bennett Godfrey, a native of England, and daughter of John & Fannie Bennett.  She was raised by William Godfrey and took their surname. Henry & Alice are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Percival was a student living in Melita, Manitoba when he enlisted for service on March 3, 1916 in Melita.  He had served two years in the Aylmer Cadet Corps. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Quebec on June 4.

Percival’s memories of some of his service overseas were printed in the Aylmer Express, November 8, 1978:

VETERAN LOOKS BACK

by P. G. Pinneo, 8th Battalion, 1st Division Signals

I was called into Brigade HQ along with others and we were told that we were moving back to the Ypres sector and we were to go on the advance party to look things over. This sent cold shivers through me as I had been there before and I hated the place. I was at Langemarck in 1915 where we retreated for five days and five nights and were finally relieved by a Scottish Division containing troops of the Black Watch, Gordons, Seaforths, Argyle and Sutherland.

They came right in overland and I’ll never forget a grizzled old Sgt. Major. He said, “We’re here now. We will take care of the Germans”. And they sure did.

We were gone from our unit five days and it was just as grim as I had remembered it, only worse. We turned in our reports and marched out of the billets, which were at Mont St. Eloi. Finally we arrived at a small village, Zupeene, where we stayed for two days and two nights. The second night everyone who was remotely connected with Brigade Headquarters, was there: Signallers and scouts. Most of these men came from different units to make up the communications section.

We got on a train near there and proceeded through the rest of Belgium to Ypres. We arrived about 3 p.m. travelling through Poperinghe, Mt. Cassie Valermtinge to the outskirts of Ypres city on the southeast side where we started to get off the train.

I looked towards the German line to the east. I counted no less that seven or eight German observation balloons. He must have seen the train and it looked to me like he was looking right down our throats. I said to myself, “it won’t be long now”.  I had had some experience with this sort of business before…it was almost immediately the first German shell screamed in. I ran for the ditch.  The first German salvo hit close to the engine and tender tipping it over and scalding the fireman and engineer to death. Talk about confusion; we had it.

He shelled the area for 30 minutes. Casualties in killed and wounded were immense. We should never have been there in the first lace, it was right out in the open – German artillery observers not four miles away. They finally got the brigade together and moved through Ypres city past the famous cloth hall.  The German gunner put a shell right into the company behind me, killing 16 men and wounding about 40. It hit right on the street. The street was paved with small red blocks which shattered on impact.  We went on through the square to the Ypres-Menin gate which was all smashed. We turned to the right here and an old sign said “Grafanstouple Rd to Menin”. That’s another story, the Battle of Menin.

We marched about 200 yards down this road and the guide said, “Halt, this is it, you will fall out and seek your billets”. There were no billets, only shell holes filled with water and ruined buildings, even Australian gunners and New Zealand drivers were asleep on the stairways leading to the cellars. There was no place for us and we were fated to sleep in the open with the wet rain and German gunfire along the canal.

Outside of Ypres was a battery of 15″ howitzers which fired an 1800 lb shell.  The gun fired 20 to 30 minutes and were loaded by means of a derrick. The language was terrible – every time the guns went off the trees went whish, whish, whish for minutes after. This area had been largely residential and there was a graveyard here. The crypts were all smashed up by gunfire and one could see the shrouded dead in their coffins. Not even the dead were allowed to rest in peace. Right up close to the fence there were the graves of five German flying officers and one was the Prince of Battenburg. His flying crew and he died here in 1915.

It was near the last of October and cold. Bill Johnson and I found an old empty dog kennel just beside the graveyard fence. We slept in it and our legs stuck out. We relieved Australian troops the next morning and we attacked Passchendaele Ridge the next morning at 4:10 a.m. which was zero hour for us. Our artillery force had been putting on a barrage since long before midnight and you could read a newspaper by the flaring light of the guns.  We made our way through the ruins of the village to where the church had stood. Now it was a pile of bricks about 40 feet high with a German machine gun pit at the high point with three guns in it. We finally took it but lost a lot of good men doing it. I remember a Sgt. Hardcastle. He said to me “when I charge the gun pit, I’ll fire a red flare and when he is busy with me, you get closer”.

We alternated this idea until finally we got close enough to lob a couple of mills grenades into the pit, killing most of the crew. We rushed the guns and when we got up to the pit one German was crawling around on his hands and knees. Hardcastle kicked him right under the chin and broke his neck. We kept the gun pit. We could see out over the village to the Ridge. The next day our signal line went out, and fellow named Clarence Gordon Moss and I went out to find the break and fix it. As we were getting up out of the shell hole, I heard a German machine gun fire. Sounded like a spandau gun. I saw Moss fall forward on his face and at the same time I felt a terrific smash just above the instep of my right leg. It was numb. I looked down and I could see a fine spray of blood. I crawled over to Moss and turned him over, face up. I tore open his jacket and got his first aid packet out and wound it around and around him as tight as I could. All this time I was sobbing to myself with fear and frustration: fear that the German would fire again and we were just helpless. I stood up and in the distance I saw two men and I waved to them to come over. They were stretcher bearers. The put Moss on a stretcher, helping him. I found myself a gun, put it under my arm and said get going and pointed to the rear. I walked and walked and finally I was crawling. I got near to the old road and the Germans were shelling it but a gun limber with two men on it came along. They loaded me into the limber and drove me to the field dressing station. The Doctor there dressed the wound and had to cut my high boot off in pieces. He poured a solution right into the wound and I thought sure I was on fire then. I was sure I was going to die. I did pass out completely and when I actually came to, I was on a hospital ship in the English Channel and an angel was bending over me and saying, “oh you’re better, just lie quietly please”.  I went to the Prince of Wales Hospital at Reading and three months after that I was back in France again.”

Percival died on September 2, 1988 at the age of 89, and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his parents.  The inscription on his monument reads:

Percival Godfrey Pineo, 1898-1988 Veteran World War 1 1915-1919 After the clangor of battle there comes a moment of rest

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 7, 1988:

PERCIVAL “JACK” PINNEO

Percival Godfrey “Jack” Pinneo, 89, of RR 1 Aylmer, died at Parkwood Hospital, London, on Friday, September 2, 1988.  He was born in Malahide Township on September 30, 1898, son of the late Henry and Alice Pinneo. He was a retired plumber.  Mr. Pinneo was a veteran of the First Great War. He served four years overseas with the signal section of the 44th Battalion, attached to the 10th Brigade.

He is survived by his wife Constance Kemp Pinneo; daughter and son-in-law Anne and Donald Brown of RR 1 Aylmer; daughter Katherine Boley of Harriston; sisters Iris Johnstone of Rochester, New York; Olive Lumley of St. Thomas; seven grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.  He was predeceased by daughter Mary Jane Stephens and sister Francis Pinneo.  A private family service was held at H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Monday, September 3.  Mr. Pinneo was cremated.

Walter Henry Pineo

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Walter Pineo was born on March 18, 1896 in Malahide, the son of George Franklin Pineo (1870-1940) & Anna Jane (Jennie) Ashton (1874-1944).  Frank Pineo was the son of George Pineo & Emily Bradley, and was married on November 14, 1894 in Sparta to Jennie Ashton, daughter of Marwood Ashton & Isabella Tansley.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Walter was farming at Castle Coombe, Saskatchewan when he enlisted for service on May 9, 1918 in Regina.  He served in the Royal Canadian Navy.

Following the war, he lived at Empress, Alberta, but returned to Elgin County where he was married on March 10, 1921 in St. Thomas to Clara May McKellar (1897-1963), of Belmont, the daughter of Hugh McKellar & Mary McLarty.

Walter died on March 25, 1949 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, March 26, 1949:

WALTER H. PINEO, PORT BRUCE, DIES

Member of Prominent Family Stricken With Heart Attack

Aylmer, March 26 – Stricken with a heart attack at his home at Port Bruce, Walter H. Pineo died suddenly about 8:30 Friday evening. He was in his 55th year.  Mr. Pineo, a life-long resident of the Port Bruce district, had not enjoyed good health for about two years, but his death was unexpected. He was born at Port Bruce on March 18, 1895, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Frank Pineo, and with the exception of his years of active service during World War 1 in the Royal Canadian Navy, had farmed in the Port Bruce district.  He was a dairy farmer before he became interested in tobacco, specializing in growing this crop for a number of years past. Mr. Pineo was a member of the Copenhagen United Church. He also belonged to Aylmer Branch 81 of the Canadian Legion and was a member of the Ontario Flue-Cured Tobacco Growers Association.  His wife, who survives, was the former Clara McKellar. Also surviving are a son, Melvin, at home, and a daughter, Mrs. Harry (Connie) Ferguson, Tillsonburg.  Ashton Pineo, Port Bruce, is a brother, and Mrs. George (Isabella) Shaw, Manistique, Mich., a sister. One brother, Louis, predeceased him several years ago. There are a number of nieces and nephews in the district. The remains are resting at the Hughson Funeral Home, Aylmer, the funeral will take place fromthere on Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Interment will be made in Aylmer cemetery.

Frank Pipe

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The name Frank Pipe is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916. 

Frank Pipe was born on October 10, 1891 in Bockhampton, Dorset, England, the son of George William Pipe & Lydia Ellen Rolls (or Barrett).  The family is found on the 1901 census living at Hampton Building, Lytchett Minster, Dorset.

Passenger lists show a Frank Pipe, age 21, a poultry farmer,  arriving in Quebec on May 8, 1913 from England. His destination was Toronto.

Frank enlisted for service on October 31, 1914 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as Ellen Pipe, of Elin Cottage, Lytchett Minster, Dorset.  He was a labourer and was not married.  He had served three years in the Dorset Reserves.

Corporal Frank Pipe returned to Canada on May 22, 1919, arriving in Montreal.  He was with the 21st Battalion.

Frank moved to Windsor where he was employed as a fitter.  He was married there on February 25, 1925 to Alvretta Cowan (1898-1936), a native of Middleton Township, Norfolk County, living in Windsor, the daughter of John Cowan & Axaie Fick.

Frank died in Windsor on September 26, 1961 and is buried with his first wife Alvretta Cowan (1898-1936) in Tillsonburg Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Windsor Star September 26, 1961: 

PIPE – Frank, 69 years, Sept. 26, 1961, at his late residence, 1970 Vimy Ave. Beloved husband of Olive Landon Pipe. Dear father of Mrs. Albert Landry (Doris), Galt, Ont.; Mervin Pipe, Riverside; Mrs. Murray K. McCallum (Barbara), Burlington, Ont. Dear brother of Mrs. Arthur Gould, William Pipe, England; 8 grandchildren. Funeral service in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home, 1969 Wyandotte St. E. at Devonshire Rd., Thursday, Sept. 28, 1961 at 7:30 p.m., thence to Tillsonburg Cemetery for graveside services Friday, Sept. 29 at 1 p.m. Rev. S.R. Henderson officiating.

 

Willard Allen Plato

2010528    Willard Plato

Willard Allen Plato was born on April 18, 1899 in Malahide, the son of Homer E. Plato (1865-1920) & Sarah Viola Moore (1870-1932).  Homer was born in Malahide, the son of Robert & Susan Plato, and was a farmer living in Springfield when he married Viola Moore on March 23, 1892 in St. Thomas.  Viola was also living in Springfield, but was born in Malahide, the daughter of William Allen Moore & Ellen Nesbitt.

Willard was a farmer living in Springfield when he enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London.  Following the war, he married Bessie McIntyre (1900-1965) on February 14, 1923 in Springfield.  She was the daughter of William McIntyre & May Herron.

Willard died on February 16, 1978 and is buried in Springfield cemetery with his wife. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, February 22, 1978:

WILLARD A. PLATO

Mr. Willard Allen Plato of 34 Oak St. Aylmer, died Thursday, Feb. 16 at the home of his daughter in Tillsonburg after a long illness.  He was 78 years old. The son of the late Homer and Viola (Moore) Plato, he was born in Malahide Township and was a retired farmer. He farmed on the 10th Concession of South Dorchester.

He was affiliated with St. John’s United Church, Springfield, and was a member of Ark Lodge 414, Springfield, past noble grand of Ark Lodge I.O.O.F. 404 and a 25-year honorary member; member of the Samaritan Lodge, past member of the Encampment and veteran of World War I.  He was also a member of the Col. Talbot Branch 81, Royal Canadian Legion, Aylmer.

Surviving is daughter Mrs. Jim (Eleanor) Prouse of Tillsonburg; brother Roland of Ridgetown, sister Mrs. Olive Murphy of Stouffville, and four grandchildren.  He was predeceased by his wife Bessie (MacIntyre) who died in 1964.  The funeral was held Saturday, Feb. 18 with Rev. Willy Ziegler of St. John’s United Church officiating.  Burial was in Springfield cemetery. Bearers were Harry Empey, Ken Buchner, John Fenn, Clayton Fulkerson, Charles Purdy and Alvin Jenkin.

Thomas Chandler Plumbridge

273857 / 285645

Thomas Plumbridge was born on November 30, 1890 in Kent, England, the son of George Plumbridge & Emma Elizabeth Baker.  The family is found on the 1901 England census living at 26 Stevens Ave., Hackney Parish, London. The census indicates Thomas was born in Battersea, Surrey.

Thomas emigrated to Canada as a “Home boy” from the Dr. Barnardo home on the ship Dominion, leaving Liverpool on August 3, 1905 and arriving in Quebec on August 12, 1905.

There are two attestation papers for Thomas.  One, dated October 18, 1916 in London, bears the service number 273857, and gives his address as Aylmer. He enlisted with the 216th Battalion. The second one, dated October 23, 1916 in Toronto, assigned him the service number of 285645.  He had moved to Toronto and was living at 30 Balminto Street.  He belonged to the 12th York Rangers, and enlisted with the 220th York Rangers Battalion.  He names his next of kin as his brother, Rev. George Plumbridge of 49 Glenarn Road., Lower Clapton, London, England.

Thomas returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on November 28. He returned to Toronto where he was living at 50 Charles Street West, when he was married there on October 8, 1924 to Edith Margaret West, of Toronto, daughter of Thomas West & Margaret Spaulding.

No further information is known.

Reuben Henry Pope

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Reuben’s name appears in a letter printed in the Aylmer Express, November 26, 1914 from “the Aylmer Boys” while in London awaiting their journey overseas. His name is not included in any previous lists of recruits, nor is his place of residence given on his attestation paper.  It is assumed he was living in the Aylmer area when he enlisted for service on November 18, 1914 in London.  He was born on September 2, 1894 in Vale, Guernsey, Channel Islands, the son of Reuben Pope & Harriet Martel.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Vale, Guernsey, where the father Reuben was a produce grower.  Reuben Jr. emigrated to Canada in 1911, landing in Halifax on April 11.  A passenger list gives his occupation as a clerk, and his intended destination was Glencoe, where he going to be a farm labourer.  He is found on the 1911 census in Appin, Ekfrid Township, Middlesex County, as a labourer living with an Eddie family.

Passenger lists show that Gunner R. H. Pope was invalided home to Canada, arriving in Halifax on September 9, 1917.  His residence is given as Glencoe, and occupation – farmer.

Reuben moved to Toronto where he was married on July 9, 1918 to Eva Miriam Prior, of London, the daughter of Walter Prior & Sarah Miller.  Eva was born in London, England.

No further information is known.

John Portch

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The name “John Portch” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Bayham.

John Portch was born on August 29, 1896 in England.  He emigrated to Canada at the age of 15 as a “Home child”, leaving Liverpool on April 25, 1914 on the ship Megantic, arriving in Quebec on May 4, 1914.  Joseph Portch also came as a “Home child” a few years earlier, in 1908 at the age of 14.  

John was farming at Corinth when he enlisted for service on February 21, 1916 in Tillsonburg.  He states he was born in England, place unknown.  He names his next of kin as his brother, Joe Portch, of Detroit.

No further information is known.

Charles Porter

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Charles Porter was born on July 9, 1874 in Malahide township, the son of John Porter (1824-1911) & Rosanna Disher (1837-1924).  John was born in England, the son of John Porter & Ann Thimblely, and was living in Yarmouth township when he was married on January 1, 1863 to Rosanna Disher, a native of Yarmouth, daughter of Bartholomew Disher & Elizabeth Beemer.  John lived at lot 24, concession 7, Malahide.  He and Rosanna are buried in Burdick cemetery, Malahide.

Charles was a farmer living in Aylmer when he was married on September 5, 1905 in Forest to Elva Flagg (1888-1962), also of Aylmer, the daughter of David Flagg & Sarah Kilmer.

Charles is found on the 1901 Malahide census with his parents in Malahide, and also in Malahide in 1911 with his widowed mother.  His wife Elva is enumerated in Warwick Township, Lambton county, with Emerson Kilmer, a widower with two small children.  Mr. Kilmer is no doubt related to Elva, and she was caring for the children after the death of their mother.

Charles & Elva were living in Tillsonburg when he enlisted for service there on February 23, 1916.  His occupation is given as miller.  He enlisted with the 168th Battalion in Canada; and served in England with the 37th Reserve and 64th Reserve, Eastern Ontario Regimental Depot.  He was discharged in May 1917, and returned from overseas on May 21, 1917, arriving in Halifax.

Charles died on July 20, 1960 at the age of 86, and is buried with his wife in Burdick cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 28, 1960:

CHARLES PORTER

A well-known citizen of the community for many years, Charles Porter, died in St. Thomas on Wednesday evening, July 20. He had been ailing for a year.  Mr. Porter was 86.  Born in Malahide Township on July 9, 1874, a son of the late Mr and Mrs John Porter, he farmed until coming to Aylmer 26 years ago.  He also followed the trade of a painter for some years.  Mr. Porter was a member of St. Paul’s United Church and of Col. Talbot Branch of the Canadian Legion, having served overseas in World War I.  He enlisted with the 168th Battalion at Tillsonburg.

Surviving are his widow, the former Elva Flagg, one son, Arthur, Caverly Road, Aylmer; a sister, Mrs. Louisa Young of Aylmer; a grandson, James Porter, of Aylmer; and a number of nieces and nephews.  The remains rested at the Hughson Funeral Home where service was conducted Saturday afternoon by the Rev. Fred Bayes of St. Paul’s United Church, assisted by the Rev. Ronald Matthewman, padre of the Canadian Legion. Burial was in Burdick cemetery, where a Legion grave side service was conducted.  Mrs. James Wright presided at the organ during the service. Pallbearers were Bert Hemphill, Jack Harvey, Bill Williams, Harry Beech, Bob Aviss and Ike Her, and the many beautiful floral tributes were carried by Roy Hamond, Mike Koleada, Jack Carrrol, Walter Carrol, Henry Faralat, Reg Wellwood. At the grave side service, the Legion members were assisted by the color party of Ron Dickenson and Stan Stanyer.  Alfred Grimes was the bugler.  Friends and relatives attended from Detroit, Windsor, Camp Borden, St. Thomas, Niagara Falls, Aylmer and vicinity.

George Frederick Porter

334518 / 3135317

George Frederick Porter was born on March 9, 1891 in Malahide, the son of Thomas H. Porter (1863-1930) & Harriet Hansley (1868-1946).   Thomas Porter was born in Lincolnshire, England, the son of Frederick & Jane Porter, and was a mechanic living in Aylmer when he married Harriet Hanlsey on February 17, 1888 in Aldborough Township.  Harriet was also born in Lincolnshire, the daughter of Robert & Sarah, and was a resident of Aldborough at the time of their marriage.

Thomas & Harriet moved to the Copenhagen area, where they farmed at lot 14, concession 2.  They are buried in Dunboyne cemetery.

George Frederick Porter first enlisted for service on May 25, 1917 in London.  It appears he served only a short time as another attestation paper exists, dated May 10, 1918, bearing the second service number given above. The second paper states he had served one month in the 63rd Battery.  Both records give his address as R.R. #2 Aylmer and his date of birth as March 9, 1892.

George died on February 13,  1950 and is buried in West Ave Cemetery, St. Thomas.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, February 13, 1950:

PORTER – On Monday, February 13, 1950, at the Memorial Hospital, George Frederick Porter, 51 Hemlock Street, beloved husband of Mrs. Lucy Porter; dear uncle of Mrs. Doris Kirk, Howard and Murray Smithson; cousin of Mrs. Hattie Fife and Mrs. Jack Bogart; after a lengthy illness.  At rest at the P. R. Williams & Son Funeral Home and the funeral will take place from there Thursday afternoon at two-thirty o’clock.  Interment will be made in the St. Thomas Cemetery.

Joseph G. Porter

The name “Joseph G. Porter” (or Portor) appears on the cenotaph in Port Burwell.  Despite an exhaustive search, no record can be found of a man by this name with a connection to the Port Burwell-Bayham area.

Roy Porter

153726

Roy Porter was born on February 23, 1887 in Malahide, the son of Thomas Porter (1857-1921) & Eltah Delphine Lemon.  Thomas was born in Walpole Township, Haldimand Co., the son of Nathaniel Porter & Mary Jane Cole, and was a teacher living in Simcoe when he married Eltah Lemon in Walpole on June 4, 1884.  Eltah was also a native of Walpole, daughter of John J. & Jane Lemon.  They lived for a short time in Malahide, but by 1889 had moved to Dutton.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Ingersoll, where Thomas is a druggist.  By 1911, they had moved to Embro.  They are buried in Ingersoll.

Roy was employed as a bank clerk and was living in Ingersoll on the 1911 census.  He later moved to Manitoba where he was living when he enlisted for service on July 27, 1915 in Winnipeg.  He was a bank clerk, and belonged to the Winnipeg Grenadiers, and had served with the 34th Fort Garry Horse.  He names his next of kin as his father, Thomas, of Embro. He served as a Sergeant with the 43rd Battalion.

Following the war, Roy returned to Ontario where he was married on July 1, 1933 in Woodstock to Marjorie E. Blair.  They moved to Detroit, where he was employed with the National Bank of Detroit.

Lloyd Clifford Potts

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Lloyd Potts was born on April 20, 1896 at Kingsmill, the son of Alfred Franklin Potts (1868-1944) & Bessie (Betsy) Locke (1869-1920).  Alfred was the son of Peter & Eliza Potts and was a cheesemaker at Mapleton when he was married on December 23, 1891 at Belmont to Betsy Locke, of Innerkip, daughter of John & Annie Maria Locke. They later lived at Kingsmill and are buried in Mapleton cemetery.

Lloyd was a painter living at Kingsmill when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1918 in London. While overseas he was married on February 12, 1919 in Cornwall, England to Florence May Bennett (1896-1972). Passenger lists show a Florence May Potts (born 1896) sailing from Southampton on the ship Tunisian arriving at St. John, New Brunswick on December 27, 1919. Her destination is given as “Kingsville”.

Lloyd died on January 11, 1979 at Elgin Manor, and is buried with his wife in Orwell cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 17, 1979:

LLOYD C. POTTS

Lloyd C. Potts, of Elgin Manor and formerly of RR 7 Aylmer, died at Elgin Manor on Thursday, Jan. 11. He was 82 years old. Mr. Potts was born in Kingsmill, Ontario. He resided most of his life in Malahide Township, retiring from the C & O Railroad. He was a member of the Springfield Masonic Lodge, a member of the Colonel Talbot Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion and a World War I veteran. He is the son of the late Alfred and Bessie (Locke) Potts.  He was predeceased by his wife, Flossie May Bennett in 1972. 

Surviving are: son, John of Toronto; daughters, Mrs. Homer (Mary) Smith of RR 1 Belmont and Mrs. Frank (Barbara) Kozma of St. Thomas; and five grandchildren.  He was also predeceased by brothers Gord, Mahlon and William, and sister, Mrs. Viola Wilcox.

The funeral was held Saturday, January 13 with Rev. Canon Robert Mills of Trinity Anglican Church officiating. Burials was made in the Orwell cemetery. Bearers were Douglas Durdle, Frank Kozma Jr., Howard Stover, Don Mossey, Mel Ashton and Dick Hartemink.

Rev. Elijah D. Pound

531794  Elijah Pound

Elijah D. Pound was born on August 16, 1881 in Bayham, the son of John K. Pound (ca 1857-1922) & Rhoda J. Kilmer (ca 1859-1935), who were married in Malahide on March 11, 1879.  John was born in Malahide, the son of Daniel & Lydia Pound.  Rhoda Kilmer was born in Malahide, the daughter of William & Sophronia Kilmer.  

The family is found on the 1901 Malahide census (Div. 2, page 7), where John is a farmer.  In 1909, a sale notice is found in the Aylmer Express for John K. Pound, at lot 8, concession 3, Malahide.  It is believed at this time, John & Rhoda moved to the Canadian West, where they are found on the 1911 census in Edmonton, Alberta.  Rhoda’s address following John’s death is given as 11723, 82nd Street, Edmonton.

Elijah had a brother Orlo Lydia Pound who was killed in action on September 11, 1916

Elijah  accompanied his parents to the west, and is found on the 1911 census in Brandon, Manitoba, a student at a Baptist Bible College.

Elijah was a student minister living at Farm Cottage, M.A.C., Winnipeg when he enlisted for service on May 1, 1916 at St. Vital.  He had served in the C.O.T.C. of Brandon College.  He lists his wife, Mrs. E. D. Pound as his next of kin. He enlisted with No. XI Overseas Field Ambulance.  He returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on February 13.

Elijah died on February 11, 1931 in Winnipeg.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, February 19, 1931:

Mrs. Eliza Stevens and Mrs. Annie L. Chambers received word this week of the death of their nephew, Elijah D. Pound, which occurred in a Winnipeg hospital on Wednesday morning, February 11th. He had been in the hospital for some months.  Deceased was born in Bayham township, a son of Rhoda Pound, of Edmonton, and the late John K. Pound. He served overseas during the Great War. Besides his mother he is survived by his wife and four children.  Many relatives in this district also survive.

The February 19, 1931 issue of the St. Thomas Times-Journal also carried an obituary, with additional details:

REV. ELIJAH D. POUND DEAD

Mrs. A. Chambers and Mrs. S. Stevens received word Tuesday of the death of their nephew, Rev. Elijah D. Pound, son of the late John K and Rhoda Pound, of Winnipeg, who passed away there in the Military Hospital, Wednesday, February 11, after being there since last fall, in his 51st year. He was well known here. He was a Baptist missionary in Manitoba for many years and a returned soldier. He is survived by his wife and four children, Alberta and Ernestine, John Henry and Norman Elijah, all at home. Many township relatives in this district also survive. He was born in Bayham. The funeral service was held in Winnipeg last Saturday, where interment was made.

Harry Earl Powers

123532 / 189136  Harry Powers

Harry Earl Powers was born on April 24, 1900 in Aylmer, the son of Reuben A. Powers (1859-1922) & Susan Wall (1865-1952). They were married in St. Thomas on February 14, 1883.  Reuben was born at Jaffa, the son of William & Eliza Powers.  Susan was the daughter of James & Delilah Wall.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Harry Earl Powers was employed as a cement worker when he enlisted for service on September 18, 1915 in Aylmer.  He had served one year with the 30th Battery in Aylmer.  He enlisted with the 70th Battalion but was transferred to the 91st Battalion on November 6, 1915.  It appears he enlisted underage, as he gives his date of birth as April 24, 1898.

Harry was married to Margaret Maude Ward. He moved to Lansing, Michigan where he died on January 4, 1986.

Herbert Leland Powers

3132876

Herbert Leland Powers was born on April 19, 1896 in Malahide, the son of Willard G. Powers (1861-1949) & Ida I. Vincent (1873-1945).  They first lived in Malahide, but by 1911 were living in Yarmouth township in the New Sarum area. Willard & Ida are buried in Orwell cemetery.

Herbert enlisted for service on April 25, 1918 while living at New Sarum. He was a farmer and was not married at the time.  He was married on October 9, 1918 at Kingsmill to Nina Evelyn Cox, of Kingsmill, the daughter of Mark L. Cox & Sarah Holmes.  

Herbert died on August 20, 1967 and is buried in Orwell cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, August 21, 1967:

HERBERT POWERS FUNERAL TUESDAY

Aylmer – Herbert Powers of RR 5 Aylmer, passed away at the St. Thomas Elgin-General Hospital Sunday, after a lengthy illness.  Born in Jaffa 71 years ago, Mr. Powers was the son of the late Mr and Mrs Willard Powers.  A carpenter by trade, he lived most of his life in the Aylmer area and served overseas during the Great War. He was a member of the Aylmer Baptist Church.  Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Edward (Jean) Jennings of Windsor; a brother Arlo of Chicago, Illinois; and a sister, Mrs. Clarance (Mabel) Thompson of Orwell. Also surviving are a number of grandchildren, nieces and nephews.  Resting at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, 119 Talbot Street East, Aylmer, for service at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday with the Rev. R. Harmer of Centre Street Baptist Church, St. Thomas, officiating. Interment will be in Orwell cemetery.

 

Morley Addison Precoor

2627325  Morley Precoor

Morley Precoor was born on March 21, 1898 at Corinth, the son of Edison Eugene Precoor (1869-1938) & Ida L. Kilmer (1870-1950).  Edison was born in Bolton, the son of William & Eliza Precoor and was a farmer living in Brooke Township, Lambton County when he was married on May 29, 1889 in Alvinston to Ida Kilmer, a native of Port Bruce living in Brooke Township, the daughter of Abram & Jane Kilmer. They are buried in Best Cemetery, Corinth.

Morley was a farmer living at Corinth when he enlisted for service on May 23, 1918 in London. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 10.

He was living in Aylmer when he was married there on May 7, 1921 to Emma Hainsworth, a native of Bingley, Yorkshire living in Aylmer, the daughter of William Hainsworth & Kate Glue.

Morley died on July 3, 1983 and is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Brantford. His obituary appeared in the Brantford Expositor, July 4, 1983:

MORLEY A. PRECOOR

At the Park Lane Nursing Home, Paris, on Sunday, July 3, 1983, Morley Precoor; beloved husband of Emma Precoor (nee Hainesworth); dear father of Mrs. Kathleen Bulizo of St. Catharines; Mrs. Nellie Van Bellegham of Woodstock; Mrs. Margaret Miller of London; Mrs. Dorothy Baris of Georgetown, and the late Mrs. Jean Smith; brother of Harry of Timmins and Frank of California; also survived by sixteen grandchildren and sixteen great grandchildren. Friends will be received at the McCleister Funeral Home, 30 Brant Avenue, Tuesday from 2 p.m. Funeral service on Tuesday at 3 p.m., followed by cremation. Rev. Russell Crossley of Zion United Church will officiate. Memorial donations to your favorite charity greatly appreciated by the family.

Basil Champernowne Prideaux

322930  Basil Prideaux

Basil Prideaux was born on March 23, 1885  in Wellington, Somerset Co., England, the son of Dr. Thomas Engledue Prideaux & Annie Cook, who were married in 1879.. The family is found on the 1891 census in Wellington, Somerset.  Thomas died in 1892, and the family continued to live in Wellington where they are found on the 1901 census living at 41 High Street.

Basil emigrated to Canada at the age of 21, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Ottawa, and arriving in Montreal on May 25, 1906. The passenger list states his destination is Aylmer.  Apparently his family was acquainted with Bishop Winnington-Ingram in England, who arranged for Basil to emigrate to Canada and settle near the Bishop’s brother at Grovesend in Malahide.  Basil may have worked on the Winnington-Ingram farm there, but was also worked for Alexander Taylor near Copenhagen.  His daughter Marjorie recalls that her father and uncle Geoffrey played on the Copenhagen Football Team.

Basil returned to England, but came back to Canada in 1909 with his brother Geoffrey, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Empress of Britain, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on March 20.  The passenger list indicates their destination is Aylmer.

Basil was a farmer living at R. R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service in Guelph on March 17, 1916.  He names his mother as next of kin, Annie Prideaux, of 59 Goldsmith Ave., Acton, London, England.

A letter from Basil was printed in the Aylmer Express, May 31, 1917:

BASIL PRIDEAUX WRITES FROM ENGLAND

Copenhagen man, in letter to Mr. R. H. Lindsay, says he has seen many Aylmer men. Was Quarantined and could not get away with his Battery. Ploughing in England with Steam and Motor Tractors. Lots of Massey-Harris Implements used there.

Trench Mortar Battery, Witley Camp, Surrey, England

May 5, 1917

Dear Mr. Lindsay:
Thanks very much for the letter, which I should have answered before, but you must excuse me as writing letters is one of my faults, or at least I should say, not writing them. Well we are still in England, landed here a year ago today, our battery went to France two months ago, but unfortunately, we were quarantined for mumps, and of course we could not get away with the rest of the boys, naturally we were very much disappointed to be left behind, as they were a fine bunch of fellows and we had all been together for so long. Now we are in the trench mortars and don’t know when we will be sent to France, but I should think they will send us very soon now. Didn’t the Canadians do well at Vimy I hear their casualties were not so large as they expected. Geoff and I were both home in London for six days, about two weeks ago and of course we had a big time, but the country over here is vastly different to what it is in peace times. Last summer I saw some boys from around Aylmer when I was in Shorncliffe. Among those I saw were Ike Williams, Harry Ely, Wyn Christie, Simon Elgie, Dick Wright, Norman Miller, Gordon Philpot and young Benson, and a lot more but of course I ran up against Mitchell, Berty’s brother, and was very sorry to hear he was killed. I shook hands with him the morning he left for France. We are having lovely weather here now, it is very hot and we have had no rain for nearly two weeks. I have seen them ploughing around here with steam and motor tractors. They use a lot of Canadian farm implements, mostly Massey-Harris, and are very thorough in their work. They certainly work the ground up before they sow a crop. I suppose you are very busy with your bees now. Geoff saw George Dally one day when he was down at the ranges. He was marching by on a route march, but of course all they could do was to wave to each other, and we never saw anything of him after that. I has very sorry to hear of Swan Dean’s death, he was such good company and I will miss him if I ever get back to Copenhagen, which of course I hope to and the sooner the better, although I would like to have a good long holiday in this country before I go back. We had several good games of football last fall and winter. I was walking down the street in Folkestone one Sunday and somebody called out “Hello, Aylmer”. It was three fellows that used to play for St. Thomas and we had quite a visit. Well at last I have found out Will Lennon’s whereabouts. It raced up a married sister of his and got his address. He is in Scotland in a munition factory. I wrote to him and got a long letter in reply. When he went to New York to see his brother he found out that he was in New Jersey and went there to see him and they both came on over to England to join up over here. Both were unable to pass the medical examination and Bill has gone up seven times and is now marked B.1, which is “Garrison duty abroad”, but as he is making munitions will not be called up until he is really needed. How are you all, I hope you are all well and  that the people around will have bumper crops this year. Geoff wishes to be remembered to you all, and will write soon, but cannot today as he is on guard.

Well I must quit now, as it is nearly suppertime.  Best wishes to all,
Yours sincerely, Basil Prideaux

Excuse pencil but it is all I can get hold of to write with.

While in England, Basil was married in 1918 in Devon to  Kate A. Collins (1885-1977). They were married at Chagford, Devon near Dartmoor.  Basil & Kate had known each other prior to the war and through Kate’s involvement with the Red Cross she visited him in hospital in England and they began a courtship. They began their married life near Basil’s old home in Wellington, where a daughter Marjorie was born in July 1919.  Basil returned to Canada  in 1919, arriving in Montreal on November 27 on the ship Canada.  His wife and infant daughter joined them later that year, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Scandinavian, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on December 26, 1919. Basil & Kate lived at lot 5, concession 2, Malahide.  Their son, F. O. Geoffrey Prideaux (1922-1943) gave his life in World War II. 

Basil died on July 4, 1959, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, July 4, 1959:

C. PRIDEAUX, DIES SATURDAY

AYLMER – Basil C. Prideaux, 20 St. George street, Aylmer, died in St. Thomas on Saturday morning following an illness of two years. He was seriously ill for the past three weeks.

Born at Wellington, Somerset, Eng., 74 years ago, he was the son of the late Dr. Engledue Prideaux and Annie Cook.  Mr. Prideaux came to Canada in 1906 and farmed most of his life at Dunboyne.  Following his retirement, nine years ago, he moved to Aylmer. He had served as school trustee at Dunboyne for several years.

Mr. Prideaux served with the Canadian Army overseas from 1916 to 1918 and was formerly a member of the Aylmer Branch of the Canadian Legion. He was a member of Trinity Anglican Church. Besides his wife, the former Kate Collins, he is survived by one son, Robert Prideaux, Sarnia; one daughter, Mrs. Albert (Marjorie) Andrews, St. Thomas; two brothers, Sir Francis Prideaux and Geoffrey Prideaux, both in England; three sisters, Miss Violet Prideaux and Mrs. Edgar (Marjory) Price, in England; and Mrs. A. H. (Helen) Cockeram, of Toronto; five grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.  A son, Flying Officer John Geoffrey Prideaux, was killed in 1943 while serving with the R.C.A.F. in Europe.

At rest at the Hughson Funeral Home here where the funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Monday. Rev. Fred Ward, of the Aylmer Baptist Church, will officiate. Interment will be made in Aylmer Cemetery.

Geoffrey Orcharton Prideaux

322931  Geoffrey Prideaux

Geoffrey Prideaux was born on July 27, 1886 in Wellington, Somerset Co., England,  the son of Dr. Thomas Engledue Prideaux & Annie Cook, who were married in 1879.. The family is found on the 1891 census in Wellington, Somerset.  Thomas died in 1892, and the family continued to live in Wellington where they are found on the 1901 census living at 41 High Street. On the 1901 census,  Geoffrey is a pupil in a boarding school in Reigate, Surrey.

Geoffrey emigrated to Canada in 1909 with his brother Basil, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Empress of Britain, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on March 20.  The passenger list indicates their destination is Aylmer.

Geoffrey was engaged to a neighbour girl, Hazel Gillett, daughter of John & Almina Gillett.  She became ill with consumption and Geoffrey did not want to enlist until she recovered.  Unfortunately Hazel passed away on March 3, 1916.  

Two weeks later both Geoffrey and his brother Basil enlisted for overseas service.

Geoffrey was a farmer living at R. R. #2 Aylmer with his brother Basil,  when he enlisted for service in Guelph on March 17, 1916.  He names his mother as next of kin, Annie Prideaux, of 59 Goldsmith Ave., Acton, London, England.

Geoffrey did not return to Canada following the war, and remained in his native England. He returned to Wellington, Somerset and was married to Margaret Cockeram in 1921.  They had one daughter Barbara.  He died in January 1960 in Somerset, England.  The accompanying photo of him was taken in the early 1940’s while he was a member of the Home Guard in Wellington, Somerset, England.

Rev. Charles Ault Procunier

2368345

Charles Procunier was born on February 21, 1869 in Bayham, the son of George Neal Procunier (1818-1886) & Elizabeth Gibbons (1823-1889).  They are buried in Old Richmond cemetery.

Charles was married to Jessie Annette Mansfield, and moved to Revelstoke, British Columbia in the 1890s,  where he was a minister.

He was living in Revelstoke when he enlisted for service there on April 25, 1917.  He names his next of kin as his daughter, Vesta E. Irene Procunier, of Sicamoss, British Columbia.

Rev. Procunier died on March 6, 1940 in Kamloops, B.C. at the age of 77.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 14, 1940:

REV. CHARLES A. PROCUNIER

JESSIE MAXFIELD PROCUNIER

Word has been received of the death of Rev. Charles A. Procunier, M.A., at Kamploops, B.C., on Wednesday, March 6th, and of the death on the following day, March 7th, of his wife, Jessie Maxfield Procunier.

The deceased couple leave to mourn their passing, a son, Charles A. Procunier of Toronto, and one daughter, Mrs. Geo. Hardy of Kentville, Nova Scotia, also five grandchildren.

Mr. Procunier was connected with the Anglican Church in B.C., and was Chaplain overseas from 1916-18.  He was the youngest and last surviving member of the family of George Neale Procunier and Elizabeth Gibbons Procunier, a pioneer Bayham township family of Richmond’s early days.

Dr. (Captain) William Ernest Procunier, M.D.

The name “Capt. Wm. Procunier, M.D.” is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

William Ernest Procunier was born on March 6, 1875 in Bayham, the son of Robert H. Procunier (1851-1923) & Annie Knott (1852-1912).  Robert was the son of George & Elizabeth Procunier, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on May 24, 1871 in Malahide to Anna Knott, of Malahide, the daughter of William & Catherine Knott.  Robert & Annie are buried in Richmond West cemetery.

No attestation paper or Officer’s Declaration can be found for William.  A biography printed in the Aylmer Express at the time of his death states he enlisted with a Newfoundland regiment in 1916, and once overseas, was transferred to the R.A.M.C., where he served as a Lieutenant and later Captain.

Dr. Procunier returned from overseas in 1920, arriving in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, on Aug 15. 

Dr. Procunier returned to Corinth, Ontario after retiring from his medical practice in Newfoundland. He died on January 3, 1931 in Toronto General Hospital from complications caused by diabetes.  He is buried with his parents in Richmond West cemetery. The following inscription is on the monument:

“Dr. Wm. E. Procunier, 1875-1931. Devoted & loved physician in Nfld. for over 20 years.  Capt. R.A.M.C. in Great War.  Greater love hath no man.”

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 8, 1931:

PROCUNIER BURIED AT RICHMOND

Practiced in Newfoundland. Served in France

Dr. William E. Procunier, eldest son of the late Mr and Mrs Robert H. Procunier, of Bayham, died in the General Hospital, Toronto, on Saturday, January 3rd, in his 56th year.  The late Dr. Procunier was born in Bayham.  He attended Aylmer High School where he obtained his matriculation. From there he went to Toronto Medical College and after graduating with honors went to Newfoundland where he practiced in Clark’s Beach.  He enlisted with a Newfoundland regiment and served in the Imperial Army Medical Corps in France during the Great War.  Returning to Newfoundland after the war he practiced in Lamaline, where he worked with devotion and self sacrifice in his chosen profession.  In 1919 he married Miss Minnie Pugh, of Harbor Grace, Nfld. In politics he was a Conservative and was a member of the United Church of Canada. He was of a most genial disposition and was a great favorite with the medical profession as with his many friends in this community who sincerely regret his passing.

He leaves to mourn his loss besides his wife, two sons, George and Edwin; one brother, George A. Procunier, of Richmond; one sister, Mrs. Walter Keast, of Toronto. The funeral was held at the home of his brother at Bayham, on Tuesday, January 6th, at 2 p.m. and was in charge of Rev. A. Boa, of Port Stanley. Interment was made in the family plot in Richmond (west) cemetery.

A biography of Dr. Procunier was printed in the Aylmer Express, March 12, 1931:

PAYS TRIBUTE TO LATE DR. PROCUNIER

The following from the Free Press, St. John’s, Newfoundland, will be of interest to the many friends of the late Dr. Procunier, who was a native of Bayham township.

Lamaline, Jan. 24 – With deep regret his friends will learn the passing of Dr. Wm. Procunier, whose death occurred at the General Hospital, Toronto, on Jan. 3rd.  He had entered the hospital for treatment for diabetes, and had been there but two weeks, all that medical skill, and tender nursing could do, proved unavailing to prolong life’s span, and his death came as a shock to his family and friends.

Dr. Procunier was born in Bayham, Ontario, in 1875, and graduated in medicine from Toronto University in 1905 and served in St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, for one year after graduating, when he was attracted by the great need of doctors in Newfoundland, and in 1906 found himself at Clark’s Beach, where he practiced for eleven years, endearing himself to the hearts of many, soothing and softening the pain of many a sufferer by his never ceasing attentiveness and kindly demeanor, which won for him the respect of a host of friends.

During the third year of the Great War, and learning of the great need of doctors to serve in the war zone, with true British courage, he enlisted with the Newfoundland regiment early in 1916.  He went overseas and was transferred to the Imperial Army. He served one year as Lieutenant with the R.A.M.C., and fourteen months as Captain with the R.A.M.C. in France. He also spent three months at a clearing station in France and served with the heavy artillery. At the close of the war, Dr. Procunier examined 2000 soldiers as to their physical fitness or disability and need of pensions.

After the war was over, he returned to Newfoundland, and in 1919 took up practice at Lamaline. The following year, 1920, he was married to Miss Minnie Pugh, of Harbor Grace, and spent nine years of hard practice at Lamaline over an area of seventeen miles, in which innumerable hardships were encountered, administering tot he needs of his patients, especially during winter seasons when the severity of the weather would test the hardest constitution.  But being of a robust nature, his many hard travels did not immediately affect his physical fitness to carry on, until an epidemic of flu which raged here during the winter of 1928 proved too much for him to attend to the wide area under his charge.  Yet with effort he kept up, and attended to his patients far and near, until finally he too contracted the flu, and was forced to yield to his waning strength and for many weeks compelled to take a complete rest.

After his convalescence and feeling he could not again resume practice in Lamaline, his wife took him to her home at Harbor Grace, where after recuperating a few months he returned to Corinth, Ontario, there to breathe once again his native air, and with high hopes of again being able to do light practice in his own native land, but God (whose ways are not our ways) had willed it otherwise, and on the date above mentioned, the soul of a highly respected and true gentleman, freed itself from its earthly habitation and winged its light to the abode of eternal day.

Few persons were better known at Lamaline than the late Dr. Procunier, his pleasing personality, and jovial disposition being foremost among his characteristics, and there were none but held him in high regard.  He was always at his best when “with the boys”, the term used by him while in France, and any community gathering was always graced by his presence, and beaming smile, when his duties did not debar him from attending.  He was also created an honorary member of Lamaline Corps of the C. I. Brigade, on the merit of his ready contributions to the forwarding of the Brigade, and often lectured the boys on how to be physically fit for drill, and on general health. In his every day life during his practice here, he had occasion to come in contact with many people, and he gained the respect of all, and the friendship of many. During his stay of nine years among us, he rendered invaluable service and was always at his post under all conditions and his memory will be fondly cherished by his many friends for years to come.

The writer, with a host of friends, extends heartfelt sympathy to Mrs. Procunier and children, also to brothers and sisters, and friends of deceased in their time of bereavement.  The funeral service was held at Corinth, Ontario, at the home of his brother, George Procunier, on Tuesday afternoon, January 6th, and he was buried in the family plot in the cemetery not far from his old home. “Father, in Thy gracious keeping, leave we now Thy servant sleeping”.

Frank Harvey Procure (Precoor)

190285  Frank Procure

Frank Procure was born on March 4, 1876 at Calton, the son of William Procure & Louisa Cascadden.  He was a farmer living in Malahide when he was married on August 4, 1898 in Aylmer to Amelia May Burdick (1868-1918), of Aylmer, the daughter of Caleb Burdick & Eliza Jane Emmett.  They had at least four children: Daisy May, Clarence W. (1901), Erie Grace (1905) and Gordon Burdick (1908).

Frank was living in Aylmer employed as a painter and decorator when he enlisted for service on April 8, 1916.  He had served one year in the 25th Elgin Regiment and 18 months in the 30th Battery.

Frank returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in Quebec on August 27.  A photograph with the following caption appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 13, 1917:

“Pte. F. L. Procure, who on Friday last returned from England, being returned to Canada on account of being past the age limit for active service in France. Pte. Procure enlisted with the 91st Batt. and went overseas with them in June 1916. He has been on duty in England ever since.”

His wife Amelia May died on June 6, 1918 in Aylmer.

Following the war, Frank lived in Aylmer continuing his trade as a painter.  He was married in May 1926 to Lavina Burdick, also of Aylmer.  He died suddenly of apoplexy in Aylmer on October 25, 1926 in his 52nd year.  He is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his first wife. The spelling of their surname on the monument is “Precoor”. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 28, 1926:

SUDDEN DEATH OF F. PRECOOR

Frank Precoor, a well-known resident of Aylmer, died very suddenly on Monday morning. He had not been feeling well on Sunday, but arose Monday morning in good spirits, ate a hearty breakfast and after doing some work in his garden came into the house and sat down on a chair, expiring without a moment’s warning. He had been working every day at his trade as painter and decorator, and it was not known that his heart was effected. Deceased was in his 52nd year and was born at Calton. For 27 years he has lived in Aylmer. He was a member of the 91st Battalion and was a member of the Western Ontario Military Police.

Besides his wife, whom he married less than a year ago, he is survived by two daughters and two sons, Mrs. Jack Stanton, Springfield; Mrs. George Chambers, Dunboyne; and Clarence and Gordon, at home. Also by his aged parents, Mr and Mrs Wm. Precoor, Calton; three brothers, Edward of Aylmer; John, Pt. Burwell; Louis, Windsor; and one sister, Mrs. John Wood, St. Thomas.

The funeral was held at his late residence, South Street, on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., and the pallbearers were members of “D” Company of the Elgin Regiment, in uniform. Interment was made in the Aylmer cemetery.

 

Roy Lee Prong

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Roy Prong was born on January 19, 1896 in Port Burwell, the son of Edward Frederick Prong (1872-1939) & Josephine Mary Beckett (1874-1968).  Edward was born in Bayham, the son of Frederick & Jane Prong, and was farming there when he was married on November 22, 1893 in Vienna to Josephine Beckett, of Houghton, the daughter of Samuel & Agnes Beckett. They are buried in Trinity Anglican cemetery, Port Burwell.

Roy was a farmer living at RR #2 Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on June 10, 1918 in London.

Roy worked for a time on a dredge in the Port Burwell harbour, then took jobs on lake boats.  Later on, he opened a wagon shop in Norwich, then in 1926 took up tobacco farming on his family’s home farm, lot 25, concession 1, Bayham.  In 1935 he moved to Forestville in Norfolk County.  He was married to Bessie Howell.  Roy died on May 9, 1975 and is buried in Cultus Cemetery, Norfolk County. His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, May 14, 1975:

ROY LEE PRONG

Service was held Tuesday, at 1:30 p.m. at the Baldock Funeral Home for Roy Lee Prong, 79, R.R. 2, St. Williams, who died Friday, May 9, 1975, from injuries received in a motor vehicle crash.  Rev. Robert Davis officiated and burial was in Cultus cemetery.

He is survived by his wife, the former Bessie Howell; a son, Edward, St. Williams; a brother Norris, Port Burwell; a sister, Mrs. Fred (Gladys) Bartram, Tillsonburg, and 10 grandchildren. A daughter, Mrs. Harvey (Donna) Aspden, died in 1963.  Mr. Prong was born in Port Burwell, son of the late Edward Prong and former Josephine Beckett.  He was educated in Port Burwell and was a farmer.

Stanton Earl Prowse

304542  Stanton Prowse

Stanton Earl Prowse was born on August 17, 1893 in Malahide, the son of William Henry Prowse (1853-1943) & Geraldine Mann (1855-1924).  William was born in Malahide, the son of Henry Prowse & Hannah Jeffrey, and was married on May 23, 1881 in St. Thomas to Geraldine Mann, daughter of John Mann & Melissa McConnell.  

Earl Prowse was a civil engineer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 8, 1915.  He had served three years in the S.F.C.C.E., and was taking an R.S.A. course.  He served as a Lieutenant.

A photograph of Earl with the following caption appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 2, 1917:

Lieut. Earl Prowse, son of Mr and Mrs Wm. Prowse, of Aylmer, who went to France as Sergeant-Major of the Queen’s University Battery. After several months of active service at the front, he was recommended for a commission, and for the past few months has been taking a special course in England. In a recent letter to his mother, he states that he has been successful in passing his examinations, and now holds the rank of Lieutenant. Like several other Aylmer men, Lieut. Prowse has had no strings to pull, but has received promotion on his ability alone. Previous to enlisting Lieut. Prowse had graduated from Queen’s University in the engineering course.

A letter from Earl was printed in the Aylmer Express, September 19, 1918:

THE HUNS ARE GOING STRONG

Writes Lieut. Earl Prowse, “In Fact Faster than the Allies can Sometimes Follow”

Mr. C. S. Bridgman has received the following letter from Lieut. Earl Prowse:

France, August 13, 1918

Dear Charlie:
If you will be kind enough to excuse paper and a pencil, I’ll get out the pipe of peace and tell you the latest gossip from this waterless Isle of steel and lead.  I humbly apologize for not answering your letter sooner, but I haven’t a decent excuse, so I won’t give one.  It’s party my fault and mostly the fault of the wily Hun on the far side of yon barbed wire.  He is a playful child, this Boche of ours and has annoyed us more than usual this spring and naturally it has taken a little harder work on our part to amuse him. We are both going strong as I write this, in fact he is going faster than we can follow. I think that he has decided that the shortest and cheapest way to Paris is via Vladivstock and Tokio. It’s a lot easier to use discretion than meet cold steel.

Now outside of all that, I am feeling fit and better than ever, if that is possible. We have our hard times as often as the rest, but with a sunny disposition it is quite possible to look cheerful and chase the troubles away into the background. Even as I write this I can very distinctly hear the double roll of the engines of one of our friends across the way, so I turn down my candle, put on my steel bonnet and await his coming. He is merely a night bomber, looking for a handy place to unload his bombs and an early return home. Bombs, I have no hesitation in declaring, are our worst enemies. A shelling is much easier on the nerves and the destructive powers of a bomb are ———- much better left unsaid. There —– one, two three, four —– he has dropped his load, safely away from us.

The Boche planes only visit us in the night. It’s fatal for him to come in daylight now. We have an undisputed superiority in the air and our worries in that direction finished. Our airmen are wonderful and are giving inestimable aid to putting out this blaze of destruction of men and material.

I notice by the papers that you have given several receptions to returned soldiers. I am glad to hear it and I am sure that the fellows are glad to know that, after suffering untold dangers and privations out here, the people at home are still with them.

I get the Aylmer Express regularly from my sister and so keep well posted on the goings on in our busy town. Mother also tells me heaps in her letters. She has been a mighty good mother to me and you can bet that I’ll never forget her for it.

I am very glad to hear that you are having such success in your business. You surely deserve credit and your conscience won’t trouble you because you have the right kind of goods. Strange it may seem since I left home, nearly three years ago. I’ve seen very few Aylmer boys. Hugh VanPatter, I saw about a month ago. I haven’t run across any of the rest for ages.

I am on duty all night tonight, so I think I had better take a turn around the shop and see if the boys all have their boots laced in the latest approved manner and incidentally see that the guns are pointed in the proper direction.

I’ll be more than glad to hear from you any time you get the chance to write. Remember me to anyone about the town who might be interested.  I will close for now and the best of luck.

Sincerely yours, Earl Prowse

Earl returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on May 9. He was married in December 1921 or January 1922 to Edna Amelia Cohoon, daughter of Emerson Cohoon.

Following the war, he was employed with Thayer’s in London. He died on June 5, 1973 and  is buried with his wife Edna (born 1894) in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, June 6, 1973:

PROWSE – Stanton Earl “Pete”. At Victoria Hospital, on Tuesday, June 5, 1973, Stanton Earl “Pete” Prowse, of 173 Thornton Ave., in his 80th year. Beloved husband of Edna Amelia (Cohoon) Prowse, and dear father of Mrs. Gordon (Barbara) Tilford of St. Thomas; and Donald H. Prowse of London. Also surviving are eight grandchildren. Resting at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 St. James St., at Richmond, where the funeral service will be conducted by Rev. Richmond, D.D., of New St. James Presbyterian Church, on Thursday, June 7, at 1:30 p.m. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

 

Herbert John Pulsford

189007  Herbert Pulsford

photo courtesy of Elgin County Archives

Herbert Pulsford was born on October 8, 1891 at Blaenavon, Monmouth, South Wales, the son of Charles Pulsford & Elizabeth Bishop.  He emigrated to Canada and was farming in the Orwell area with Alanson E. Snelgrove, which is the address he gave when he enlisted with the 91st Battalion on October 25, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his brother, A.E. Pulsford of 17 Landown Rd., Leicester, England.

Herbert returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 23.  His next of kin is listed as his brother, of 29 Elysian Street, St. Thomas.

There is a Herbert J. Pulsford (1893-1953) buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London with wife Elizabeth E. Smith (born 1901).  This is believed to be the same man.  He died on May 4, 1953, and his obituary appeared in the London Free Press, May 5, 1953:

PULSFORD – At St. Joseph’s Hospital on Monday, May 4, 1953, Herbert John Pulsford, of 78 Albion street, in his 60th year. Beloved husband of Elizabeth (Smith) Pulsford, and dear father of Miss Jacelyn Margaret and Miss Sylvia Jane Pulsford, both at home; and Douglas Herbert Pulsford, also at home. Brother of Mrs. Arthur Cooke, of St. Thomas, and Henry Pulsford, of Lester, England. Resting at the Needham Memorial Chapel, 520 Dundas street, where the funeral service will be conducted on Wednesday, May 6 at 2 p.m. Interment in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

Erval Edwin (Edward) Pyatt

3139050   

Erval Pyatt was born on May 8, 1897 at Avon, the son of George Francis Pyatt & Emily Kilbourne.  George was born in North Dorchester township, the son of James & Rhoda Ann Pyatt and was farming there when he was married on September 21, 1892 in London to Emily Kilbourne, also of North Dorchester, the daughter of Charles & Hannah Kilburn. They are buried in Dorchester Union cemetery.

They moved to Iona where Erval was farming with his parents when he enlisted for service on June 18, 1918 in London.

Erval died on March 31, 1962 and is buried in Cowal-McBride cemetery with his brother James and wife Emma.  His obituary appeared in the Dutton Advance, April 4, 1962:

ERVAL PYATT DIES IN 65TH YEAR

A well-known resident of Iona Station, Erval Edwin Pyatt, died Saturday in the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital in his 65th year.  The son of the late George Pyatt and Emma Kilbourne, he was a retired trucker since 1958.  He was a member of the Iona United Church. Mr. Pyatt was born in Dorchester and moved to Iona as a young boy.

He is survived by four brothers, George of Dutton; Garfield, of Iona; James of Iona Station; Arthur of West Lorne; and one sister, Mrs. Rupert Jones of Fingal.

Rev. J. Morley Colling of the Fingal and Iona United Church conducted the service at the Cyril J. Beill Funeral Home on Tuesday.  Mrs. Mildred McNeil was at the organ. The pallbearers were Kenneth Small, James Milligan, Duncan McAlpine, Charles Winters, Percy Whalls, Henry Whalls.  Interment was made in Cowal Cemetery. Friends and relatives attended from Windsor, Forest, West Lorne, St. Thomas, Brantford, Ingersoll, London, Port Stanley, Fingal, Talbotville, Shedden, Iona and surrounding district.

Garfield Frederick Pyatt

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Garfield Pyatt was born on March 23, 1895 at Avon in North Dorchester Township, the son of George Francis Pyatt & Emily Kilbourne.  George was born in North Dorchester, the son of James & Rhoda Ann Pyatt, and was married on September 21, 1892 in London to Emily Kilbourne, also of North Dorchester, the daughter of Charles & Harriet.  The family later moved to Iona in Elgin County.

Garfield was a farmer living at Iona when he enlisted for service on June 17, 1918 in London.

He was married in 1929 to Mary McArthur (1900-1945), daughter of James & Sarah McArthur.  He died on June 2, 1980 and is buried with his wife in Cowal-McBride cemetery in Dunwich. His obituary appeared in the Dutton Advance, June 4, 1980:

GARFIELD F. PYATT PASSES AT 85

Garfield Frederick Pyatt, long-time Iona resident, passed away at Memorial Continuing Care Centre, St. Thomas, on Monday, June 2nd, in his 86th year.  Born in North Dorchester Township on March 23rd, 1895, Mr. Pyatt was a son of the late George Pyatt and Emma (Kilbourne) Pyatt. He moved to Iona with his parents nearly 80 years ago and had resided there since.

Mr. Pyatt formerly farmed and was also employed by the Department of Highways and as a rural mail courier.  Predeceased by his wife, Mary (McArthur) Pyatt, he leaves a daughter, Mrs. Jack (Margaret) McAlpine, R.R. 3 Iona Station; two sons, Ronald of Iona and Harold of Springfield; nine grandchildren; three brothers, James of Iona Station, Arthur of West Lorne and George of Dutton. He was also predeceased by a brother, Erval and a sister, Mrs. Rupert (Voylet) Jones.  

Pastor Dan Cudney of Iona Christian Fellowship Church will conduct the service at Arn-Beill Funeral Home on Wednesday, June 4th at 3:30 p.m. Interment in Cowal-McBride’s cemetery. Donations to the Ontario Heart Fund will be appreciated.

Dr. Cecil Alexander Rae, M.D.

The name “Capt. Cecil Rae, M.D.” is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Cecil Alexander Rae was born on July 14, 1889 at Acton in Halton County, the son of Rev. James William Rae & Agnes Jane McKague.  Rev. Rae was minister at Knox Presbyterian Church, Aylmer, from 1901 to 1906.

Cecil first enlisted for service on April 29, 1915 in Toronto.  His service number was 50492.  He was a student at the University of Toronto, and belonged to the C.O.T.C.

He signed an Officer’s Declaration paper on March 15, 1917 at St. John, New Brunswick.  He gives his address as Newcastle, Ontario, and was a physician.  He names his next of kin as his father, Rev. James Wm. Rae, of Newcastle.  He was a member of the Army Medical Corps, and was a Captain in the 16th Field Ambulance.

Cecil was a physician living in Toronto when he was married on September 4, 1926 in Acton to Marion Wilson Richardson.

Sydney Raymond Raven

190080

Sydney Raven was born on September 1, 1894 in Colchester, Essex, England,  the son of William Raven & Emeline Eaton (1866-1928), who were married in 1886 in Colchester. The family is found on the 1901 England census at 3 Artillery Place, Colchester, Essex.  William Raven was employed as a carman, while Emeline was a tailoress. 

It appears that Sydney emigrated to Canada before his parents. He was married in Bayham in 1910, and  is found on the 1911 census in Bayham Township with his wife’s parents.  Two sisters, Grace and Gertrude emigrated to Canada in 1910. The parents, William & Emelne, with the rest of the family – Harold, William, Raymond and George – sailed from Liverpool on the ship Corsican, arriving in Halifax on April 14, 1912. They settled at Richmond.  Emeline died in Niagara Falls in 1928. A son, Harold  Raven, was killed in action on September 8, 1916.

Sydney Raven was a labourer living in Bayham when he was married on December 21, 1910 in Corinth to Pearl Morse (1891-1921), of Bayham, the daughter of Albert Morse & Martha Honsinger.  

He was a farmer in Bayham when enlisted for service on March 8, 1916 in St. Thomas with the 91st Battalion.

Sydney’s wife Pearl died on December 31, 1921 in Bayham and is buried in Richmond West cemetery.  Sydney then moved to Niagara Falls where he was living when he was married on November 14, 1924 in Chippewa, Welland County to Edna May Office, of Niagara Falls, the daughter of James Office & Frances Elizabeth Skilton.

No further information is known.

William Charles Raven

190042

William Raven was born in 1901 in Colchester, Essex, England, the son of William Raven & Emeline Eaton (1866-1928), who were married in 1886 in Colchester. The family is found on the 1901 England census at 3 Artillery Place, Colchester, Essex.  William Raven was employed as a carman, while Emeline was a tailoress. It cannot be determined if the family emigrated to Canada at the same time, or if some of the children came over first.  A son Sydney is found on the 1911 census in Bayham Township, and a daughter Gertrude is also in the 1911 census. William & Emeline emigrated soon after, and lived at Richmond.  Emeline died in Niagara Falls in 1928. 

It appears that William’s brother Sydney emigrated to Canada before the rest of the family. He was married in Bayham in 1910, and  is found on the 1911 census in Bayham Township with his wife’s parents.  Two sisters, Grace and Gertrude emigrated to Canada in 1910. The parents, William & Emelne, with the rest of the family – Harold, William, Raymond and George – sailed from Liverpool on the ship Corsican, arriving in Halifax on April 14, 1912. They settled at Richmond.  Emeline died in Niagara Falls in 1928. A son, Harold  Raven, was killed in action on September 8, 1916.

William was farming in Bayham there he enlisted underage on March 7, 1916 in St. Thomas. He gave his date of birth as August 8, 1899. His brother,  Harold  Raven, was killed in action on September 8, 1916.  William returned from overseas on May 21, 1917 arriving in Halifax.

An article about William was printed in the St. Thomas Journal, June 5, 1917:

BAYHAM LAD’S RECORD SHOULD MAKE SLACKERS HANG HEADS

Bayham, June 5 – A boy hero who enlisted at the age of 14 years, arrived home in Richmond, the latter part of the week, bearing two wounds received in the trenches last October and an honorable discharge from the army. He is Pte. William Charles Raven, who enlisted in “C” Company, 91st Battalion, August 6, 1915, and was 15 years of age August 5, 1916.

Pte. Raven, who looks much older than he really is, was wounded at Givenchy receiving bullets through his left arm and his thigh, after having been in the trenches three months after receiving his wounds, the remainder of one of which, the bullet in the thigh, is still in his body. Pte. Raven was removed to Bradford Hospital, England, for treatment. While delirious, he let out his age but afterwards stated when questioned that his (army) age was considerably over the one he unconsciously gave out while sick. The military authorities however, would not be convinced and sent to Canada for his birth certificate, which, however, was at his birthplace in England. After a considerable delay, it was at last obtained and gave his real age.  The young veteran was then transferred to the convalescent home at Folkestone and on becoming sufficiently recovered was sent back to Canada instead of to the trenches as he expected. His eldest brother, Harold, was killed in action at Givnchy, on September 8, 1916.

His father, William Raven, also tried to enlist, but was rejected. The family came to Bayham from England almost five years ago.

William was living in Niagara Falls in the 1920s, working as a metal polisher. No further information can be found.

Cecil Andrew Raymond

334530

Cecil Raymond was born on January 21, 1898 in Willow City, Bottineau County, North Dakota, the son of Dr. Argo Raymond (1868-1908) & Alice Rosalind Schooley (1875-1943). Argo Raymond was born in Houghton Township, Norfolk County, the son of Andrew Raymond & Hannah Bowen of Clear Creek. Dr. Raymond was a veterinarian, and moved to North Dakota about 1895.  The family returned to Ontario about 1907 and settled in Aylmer where Dr. Raymond died in 1908 in his 40th year.  He and Alice are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Cecil was employed as a clerk in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on May 21, 1917 in London.

He became a medical doctor and moved to the United States first living in Illinois, then moved to Ohio where he is found on the 1930 census in Barbertown, Summit County.  His wife’s name was Doris, and they had one daughter, Ruth, born about 1926 in Illinois.

Dr. Cecil Raymond died in February 1985 in Sun City, Maircopa County, Arizona.

 

William Grant Reasbeck

1004161  William Reasbeck

William Reasbeck was born on February 1, 1884 at Plantagenet, Ontario, the son of William Reasbeck & Christine Lunen, natives of Scotland.  He was married on September 7, 1912 in North Bay to Alphonsine (Eva) Brisebois, the daughter of Baptiste Brisebois & Henriette Racine.

William was a labourer living in Parry Sound when he enlisted for service there on January 22, 1917.  

He and his wife moved to Aylmer in 1942.  He died on March 10, 1973 at the age of 89 and is buried in Queen of Peace Cemetery.  A military monument with the following inscription marks his resting place: “William Reasbeck, Private, 52 Battn. C.E.F.  10 Mar 1973, age 89″

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 14, 1973:

WILLIAM REASBECK

William Grant Reasbeck of 49 Chestnut St., Aylmer, died on Saturday at the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital following a lengthy illness. He was in his 90th year.  Born in Plantagenet, Ontario, the son of the late Mr and Mrs William Reasbeck, he had lived in Aylmer since 1942.

He was a member of Our Lady of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church, Aylmer. He served in World War I with the 52nd Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Corps.

Surviving are his wife, the former Eva Brisebois; a daughter, Mrs. Evelyn McClean of Campbellville; two brothers, Edward of Quebec; and Robert of Toronto; a sister, Mrs. Amelia Standing of Ottawa; 12 grandchildren and three great grandchildren.  A son, the late Edward Reasbeck, died in January of this year.

Funeral was held Monday morning from Our Lady of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church, with burial taking place in Queen of Peace Cemetery. Father Charles McManus officiated. The H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.

Ambrose Sylvester Reavely

675884

Ambrose Reavely was born on August 31, 1881 at Otterville in South Norwich Township, Oxford County, the son of George Hamilton Reavely & Margaret Malcolm.  George was born in Middleton Township, Norfolk County, the son of William & Margaret Reavely, and was living in South Norwich when he was married on May 8, 1877 in Ingersoll to Margaret Malcolm, also of South Norwich, the daughter of Robert & Martha Malcolm. They are buried in Bookton Cemetery, Windham Township, Norfolk County.

Ambrose Reavely was a railroad brakeman living in Aylmer with his parents when he enlisted for service on April 11, 1916 in Tillsonburg.

A letter from Ambrose to his father was printed in the Aylmer Express, December 21, 1916:

ROUGH TRIP ACROSS – CHASED BY SUB

Warm Welcome All Along the Line and in England

Splendid Description of The Country and Camp Life

Mr. George H. Reavely, proprietor of the Star Theatre, has received the following most interesting letter from his son, Private Ambrose S. Reavely, who is with the 168th Battalion, at West Sandling Camp, Shorncliffe, England

Dear Father –
Well, here I am in England, and this is really the first chance I have had to write you and tell of my whereabouts. Of course you know when we left Camp Borden, Oct. 27, at 4:45 p.m. We had a real pleasant journey to Halifax. The scenery through Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia was considerably different to that of Canada. Saw all kinds of mountains, lakes, rivers and forests. We were royally received by the people everywhere we stopped. They shook hands with us through the windows, handed us papers, and wished us good luck on our mission.  I was guard on one of the doors from Camp Borden to Halifax. We travelled in two sections, and I was on the second.  Our train consisted of 12 coaches, 2 dining cars, a baggage car, and a caboose for the train crew, making sixteen in all. The train crews through Quebec were all French.  The train orders were all in English, so you see the engineer and conductor had to be able to read and write English. They all seemed to be good fellows, and being a train man myself, I had several chats with them. They all belong to the different railroad organizations.  One fireman quit the job along the road in Quebec, and I went over and did the firing for quite a distance.  We happened to get another fireman before reaching a terminal.  I went over to the engine next morning, and fired over nearly the whole division, up and down mountains, and through great rocky cuts. That was the place to see the country.  It was great.  The crew seemed quite amused at my firing the engines, as I had no trouble at all and was quite at home. It also gave me some good exercise and was better than sitting in the coach all the time.  It seemed to amuse our fellows, too, to know they had one of the bunch over at the machinery part of the train.  I met a brakesman in New Brunswick who broke for Billy Halsam in British Columbia, and you remember I broke fro him in St. Thomas. So you see this is a small world after all.

We arrived in Halifax on Monday morning, and were almost immediately marched on the boat. The 161st Battalion from Camp Borden was on board when we arrived, and the following day the 133rd (Norfolk) Battalion came aboard, and this completed the loading of the ship. They carried a crew of about 350 men. There were also a few navy men returning home to England. I am not permitted to tell you the name of the ship. We did not leave Halifax until Wednesday, at 5 p.m., and it was quite foggy, and drizzling rain. Besides ours, there were four other transport ships carrying troops, as well as an armed naval cruiser, which escorted us all the way across. There were also ten torpedo destroyers came out to meet us a couple of days before we reached port, and I guess we sure needed them, as the Irish Sea was strewn with mines, and we were also chased by submarines, so you see we were in some danger. The captain said it was the most trying trip he had ever experienced, and he is credited with being a good one, too. After we crossed the bar of the Mersey River into safety, beads of perspiration were standing out on his face and forehead, and he took off his cap and thanked God. It was a more dangerous voyage than the boys were aware of.  We came along the north coast of Ireland, which was our first sight of land, and believe me, it was a welcome sight. It looked real green, and is properly named the Emerald Isle.  The sea is even a greener hue around there than father out to sea.  That is not a joke, either. We could almost see faintly the south coast of Scotland, and I observed some of our Scotchmen looking longingly that way, perhaps to get a look at the heather and also hear the sound of the bagpipes.  But we were too far away for that. Neither could I see any Irishmen smoking short clay pipes in their native homes.

I guess I have gotten a little ahead of my story.  I forgot to tell you the boat we were on was a really nice one, and one could not realize what an ocean liner is like unless he really saw it for himself. It is a city in itself. The first day out to sea, everyone seemed to be getting sick, and by the second day, I really believe 90 percent of them were seasick.  O, gee, such a sight.  A fellow needed a cast-iron stomach not to get sick himself, but I braved the storm and was not sick a single minute. Everyone seemed to think I had crossed more than once before. Of course, that is not the case.  Many of those who had crossed before were also sick. Harry Sykes was always on the job, and not sick, and we never missed any meals, which were very good, although everything was cold storage stuff, and not altogether to our liking. The second day all the waiters were sick, and I helped the steward in our department for the day. Of course there were not many to feed, and they came to the cookhouse with their own plates that day.  Our own men acted as waiters on the way across, and were paid extra for their services. We had a rolling sea most of the way and experienced some real rough weather.  Many times the decks were washed by the sea, as she rolled and pitched. She did both.  Ha! Ha!. Of course at night all the ship’s lights were covered, and no smoking allowed on deck after dark. Every battalion had to do guard duty all the way across, as there were certain parts of the ship the men were not allowed to frequent. We also had boat and fire drill nearly every day, and each man had to know where his own life boat was. I rather enjoyed the trip across, but like all the rest was glad to get off, and once more set foot on land.

We arrived at Liverpool Saturday morning, so you see we were some time coming across, ten days sailing, besides being in the harbor two days. We were also on the ship all day at Liverpool, being taken off at 4 p.m., and entrained at 6 p.m. One the way over we had to keep together, and wait for the slowest boat. We could not always see all the ships of our own bunch. Our ship could make 28 knots an hour in a good sea, but we frequently took a zig-zag course. We covered 2,490 miles by water. The people in the ferry boats crossing the river from Liverpool to Birkenhead all cheered us as they passed and repassed our ship. They probably thought we were North American Indians, and wanted to get a good look at us. Ha! Ha! Liverpool is certainly some harbor, and you see ships there from all over the world; all kinds, styles and classes. It is also one of the largest cities in England.

Well dad, you should see the trains. Small engines and coaches and entirely different from what we have in Canada.  Of course we did not have the best carriages, as they call them here. They are smaller than ours, and have side entrances and compartments, a door for each compartment on either side. Each compartment accommodates eight persons in the carriages we used, and the seats face each other. You are also supposed to be locked in while travelling. The station platforms are all built high and even with the carriage doors, and you step from the platform right inside the carriage. The engines are small and have high wheels. As there are no level crossings, they have no bell. The whistle similar to that of a merry-go-round. They can travel like the devil, though, and pulled the train carrying the whole battalion at the rate of 60 miles an hour. I think we had twenty carriages in our train. The roadbeds are fine, and very level. The tracks are a narrower gauge than our own. Girls came around selling newspapers before we left. The money here is different, of course, and we lost from two to four cents per dollar changing our money. We came to the southeast coast of England, and are only four miles from the English Channel, and right across from France. We passed a station that had been almost destroyed by German bombs, dropped from Zeppelins.  One place where we stopped the ladies sold us tea, coffee, cake, etc., and we received a warm welcomed al along the line. It was still dark when we arrived here. The difference between your time and English time is 5 ½ hours, which is faster here. We found a sea of mud here, and clay at that. It had been raining for three weeks previous to our coming. We were marched a short distance from the station to our camp, which is entirely composed of Canadians, men, officers and all. We were put in tents, and given some brad, salmon and tea, and were then allowed to lie down until 9:30 a.m. The men all live in what they call huts, built to accommodate about 30 men. We were placed under quarantine, which happens to every battalion on arrival. We have had a few cases of measles, that is all. We were paraded in the afternoon, and our names and numbers checked off. We were told that we would be immediately split up, and would lose our officers, and be attached to the 12th and 39th battalions, respectively. I was to go to the 39th, but after consideration it was decided to leave us together for a time at least so we are still the 168th Battalion. All battalions have been broken up on arrival here. Those who watched us move off the parade ground said they had never seen a finer bunch of men move away from there, all in step and looking healthy, and as a whole, good-aired men of splendid physique. We all had a medical examination, and not one case of vernal disease was found in the whole battalion, which is a record, so I am told, that no other battalion has ever attained. Of course all these things have benefitted us and kept us together so far. In the medical examination the men were put in different classes, as regards fitness and age. Some will doubtless be rejected and never see France or leave here. They are keeping over-age men and physically unfit men here until after the war to do guard duty and fatigue work, thus relieving those who are training for the front from those duties.

I was placed in “F” Class, which means fit, and expect to be in a training company for France and will be in the first draft of our battalion to go, which may not be very long, as some are only here from four to six weeks before they get away. There are no bright colors used here in camp. The buildings are not painted, and the huts are not painted, but the tents are all of a dark color, so as not to be easily spotted day or night by the enemy aeroplane or Zeppelin. The camp is in darkness after sunset, as all blinds are drawn, and the tent flags are kept closed, and no lights about the grounds. All lights in tents and building must be out at 9:45 p.m. They are strict about this, and any infraction means severe punishment. One can see powerful searchlights in the skies keeping a lookout for enemy aircraft. There was an air raid on this camp a short time ago. During the day our aeroplanes are as common as birds. They are all marked underneath, so that if they get close enough we can tell whether they are our own machines or not. An aeroplane can go from here to the firing line in 40 minutes, as we are only 40 miles distant, so you see we are getting somewhat close, eh?  We can hear the roar of the big guns, and one day last week they seemed to roar continually. There are a great many returned soldiers here in camp. Some are instructors, many have to return again. Some are sick, and some on leave. One friend of mine, whom I have known since school days, Charles Morse, of St. Thomas, has been wounded several times. I thought he was going to kiss me when we met. He is still a whole man. Who do you suppose was the first acquaintance I met? Jack Hanson, of Aylmer, looking just as large as life and twice as natural. Of course we had a hearty handshake and a good chat. He has been in the hospital here. Several of the officers of the 91st (Elgin) are here. I will see them as soon as I can. I have a lot of the boys to look up yet.  They were looking for men with railroad experience here just before our arrival. I hear that they are short of them in France, and I may go over in that capacity. They go quite near the firing line, and are often in great danger, as the enemy try to get them while carrying munitions and supplies.

There are several small places near here; in fact England is dotted with them. There is nice scenery around the camp, and at the north end there is a very large hill, from which you can see the English Channel. The roads are very crooked. We have had a couple of route marches, and I enjoyed them very much. The fences are Hawthorne hedges mostly in the country, and the flowers were still in bloom when we came, but I know they are all gone now, for real winter has set in. The ivy simply grows wild, and you can pick it along the roadside. The same with holly. All kinds of holly trees, and they look fine, too. There is an old English castle close to camp. I have also seen the old-fashioned Dutch windmills, such as you have seen in pictures. There is sure lots to be seen here if one gets the chance.

I expect we will get a four or six days’ leave as soon as we are out of quarantine. We have had snow and freezing weather. We parade to the cook house with our mess tins, and then go back to the cold tents and eat our rations, which are cold before we get there. Of course we have to shave every morning, and I have used my tea, instead of going after icy water. I know I have pulled some awful faces, but I guess that is all in the game. Yesterday afternoon it started to rain again, cold rain, too, and some of us were put in huts last night, but the rest are still shivering in the tents. The sick and those subject to rheumatism were given the preference. The huts have a small coal stove in them, and we are supplied with coal. Our meals are also brought in, and we have tables to eat on and dishes to use. The meals are very good; no complaints on that score. We neither have tea nor butter at dinner. Our beds are all that could be expected, and we have four blankets each. Every man has his own place for everything, and sleeps in his own special place. The least infraction gets one in serious trouble here, and for every little offence they stop your pay for the rest of the time over here, except 20 cents a day. The remainder you get after the war. The other Aylmer boys in this battalion are well.

This is some long letter, and I guess I have told you nearly all I can think of now. You might give this letter to the Aylmer Express and send a paper to our relatives, which will save me the trouble of writing them, for which I really have not the time. If it is published, I wish you would send me a copy of the Express. It seems funny to have no home news at all when so far away. Remember me to any who ask about me. I am all right now, but a long away from you Dad. This is surely an awful war, and one begins to realize it over here.

Prices have advanced very rapidly here since the war, and everything one buys is very high. Even a small paper box of matches costs a penny (2 cents). Hotels and cigar stores given them away in Canada.

Write  me as soon as you receive this and tell me all the news; and cheer up, for I will return some day and tell you all.  I am as always, your loving son, Ambrose

Give the following address to anyone desiring to write me:

Private A. S. Reavely, No. 675884, C.Co., 168th Battalion, 3rd Brigade,

West Sandling Camp, Shorncliffe, Kent, England

Ambrose moved to Windsor in the 1920s where he died on July 24, 1952.  His obituary appeared in the Windsor Star, July 24, 1952:

S. REAVELY ILL SHORT TIME

Ambrose Sylvester Reavely, formerly of 167 Oak, died in Metropolitan Hospital today after a short illness.  He was 72.  Born in Otterville, Ont., he had resided in Windsor 30 years, coming from St. Thomas.

A veteran of World War I, Mr. Reavely enlisted in the 180th Battalion in 1915, later transferring to the 2nd Battalion. He served in France and Belgium, where he was wounded in action, and discharged medically unfit in 1918.  There are no survivors.

Funeral will be Saturday at 2 p.m. from the Anderson Funeral Home, 985 Ouellette. Rev. H. H. Paulin, D.D., officiating. Burial is to be in Windsor Grove Cemetery under semi-military auspices.

Rene Dunn Campbell Reavie

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The name Rene Reavie is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Rene Reavie was born on October 28, 1883 in Aldborough Township, the son of Archibald Reavie (1860-1942) & Nettie M. Dunn (1856-1905).  Archibald was born in South Dorchester Township, the son of Archibald & Mary Reavie, and was living in Aldborough when he was married on October 16, 1882 in South Dorchester to Nettie Dunn, a native of South Dorchester living in North Dorchester, daughter of John & Margaret Dunn.  Archibald & Nettie moved to Malahide, where they are found on the 1901 and 1911 census. They lived at lot 14 & 15, concession 7, and are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Rene became a school teacher, and taught at Copenhagen in Malahide Township from 1905 to 1907.  He married Violet Reid (1888-1967), daughter of John Reid & Sarah Stewart, of Copenhagen. 

Rene was a teacher living at Pearson in Casey Township, Timiskaming District, when he enlisted for service on July 2, 1916 in New Liskeard.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on June 13.  They were living in London, Ontario when Violet’s father died in 1937.

Rene Reavie died on January 31,  1965 in London, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, February 1, 1965:

RENE DUNN REAVIE

Rene Dunn Reavie, 81, of 694 Colborne St., a former teacher at H. B. Beal Secondary School, died yesterday in Mason Villa Hospital.  Mr. Reavie was born in Harrietsville and had lived in London 38 years. He taught mathematics, English and penmanship at Beal for 26 years, retiring in 1952. Prior to coming to London he had taught at several Northern Ontario mining towns.

He was a graduate of Queen’s University and a member of the Queen’s Alumni.  Mr. Reavie was an adherent of Colborne Street United Church, a member of Kilwinning Lodge, No. 64, and a life member of the Scottish Rite.  He served overseas for four years during the First World War with the Royal Canadian Engineers.

Surviving are his wife, the former Violet Reid; sons, Stewart A., of Brantford; and Campbell, of London; sisters, Mrs. George (Rowena) Binns, of St. Thomas, and Mrs. James (Ava) Cadoo of London; two grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Service will be held in Needham Memorial Chapel on Wednesday at 1 p.m. Rev. J. T. P. [illegible] of Colborne Street United Church, assisted by Rev. Guy Markham, retired minister, will officiate. Burial will be in Aylmer Cemetery.

John Adrian Regan

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Jack Regan appears in a photograph in the Aylmer Express, November 22, 1972, honoring veterans at the Aylmer Legion.  It is not known if he had lived in Aylmer at one time. He was born on September 1, 1895 in St. Thomas, the son of Charles William Regan (1859-1919), a merchant, & Ellen S. McVey (1864-1931).  They are buried in Holy Angels Cemetery, St. Thomas.

Jack was living with his parents at 46 Pearl Street, St. Thomas, employed as a locomotive fireman when he enlisted for service in St. Thomas on October 7, 1915. He served overseas with the 2nd Canadian Pioneer Battalion and with the 6th Battalion Canadian Engineers.  He was discharged in May 1919.

He died in 1976 and is buried with his parents in Holy Angels Cemetery, St. Thomas.

Harry John Richardson

84178  Harry Richardson

Harry Richardson is found in a list of recruits printed in the Aylmer Express, November 14, 1914.  He is described as a bricklayer, married, and a member of the 30th Battery, C.F.A.  Harry’s attestation paper is not available for viewing.  He was born in 1884 in Hove, Sussex, England, the son of Henry & Maggie (or Catherine) Richardson. The family is found on the 1901 England census in Brighton, Sussex.  Henry (born about 1870 in Shorsham, Sussex) was a bricklayer.  His wife’s name is given as Maggie, (born about 1869 in Brighton, Sussex). Harry’s brother, Private Albert Thomas Richardson (123782) was killed in action on October 12, 1918. 

Harry was married to Clara Pressnail in 1902 in Brighton, Sussex, England.  They emigrated to Canada in 1907, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Empress of Ireland, and arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on March 20.  They are found on the 1911 census in Aylmer, where Harry was a mason.  Harry’s name is also found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church, Aylmer, who were serving overseas (St. Thomas Journal, October 7, 1916).  In that list, he is described as a “returned soldier, wounded”.  His brother Albert’s notice of death in 1918 states that he is a “brother of Driver Harry Richardson of Aylmer, who has served his time and was invalided home after a long chapter of painful accidents”.

Mrs. Richardson also returned to England during the war to serve as a nurse. She returned to Canada in 1915, arriving in New York on November 23.   A letter from her was printed in the Aylmer Express, September 2, 1915:

STORIES OF GERMAN ATROCITIES ARE CONFIRMED BY AYLMER WOMAN

Mrs. George Grass has received the following letter from Mrs. Harry Richardson, a former Aylmer woman who went to England to serve as a nurse after her husband, Driver Harry Richardson had sailed. Mrs. Richardson has been visiting relatives in England but expects to leave for the front soon.

Standford, P.O., Kent, England, August 5th, 1915

Dear Friend – Received your ever welcome letter and am answering it straight back as it takes so long to get both ways. Well, dear friend, I trust this will find you in the best of health, also Mr. Grass and all the family, as I am very pleased to say it leaves us both quite well.  We were very sorry to hear that Mr. Grass had not had much work.  Harry seems to get more than he can do but they are training them hard now.  He gets up at 3:30 in the morning and goes till 6:30 at night. All this week they are learning shooting at the butts, and Harry both days made 20 points out of 25. He also won the race at driving through gates at a gallop. He likes the life more now that I am here with him, but it is a dreadful sight to see the wounded walking about. There are about 700 close to where I am staying and they have to come by here to get to the hospital camp. There was a soldier struck dead with lightning here and some more injured and Harry said last night he thought one was struck yesterday.  I can hear the big guns quite plainly this morning, the wind is the right way to give you some idea how close we are to the firing line. Harry got a letter from his brother in France posted on August 3, and we got it on August 4th, so you see we are not far away, about eight miles from Dover and France is just across the water.  

We had a pleasant surprise on Sunday, my nephew came to see us.  He is in the Royal Sussex Regiment and he has been digging trenches in case the Germans get into England.  You would be surprised to see the way the people here go on with their work just as if there was no war.  I wish you could see the trenches that are ready in case of the Germans getting in.

At my home in Brighton along the sea front they have put air guns to bring down the air ships and big guns to fire out to sea and barb wire entanglements to keep them from landing if they get so far.

What Mr. Sinclair said in his letter to the Aylmer Express which Olive sent me, about the Belgians having their hands cut off is quite true.  There are a lot of them at Folkestone, about four miles from here.  It is a sad sight. Aylmer knows nothing. I think if some of the young men over there could see the wounded here they would feel like joining the army. I trust and pray when the time comes for Harry to go he will not forget his duty and do his best and come home safe and sound again to us all.  Yesterday was a hard day for the Canadians here. They were inspected by General Hughes, along with their guns and wagons and it rained all the time. There are about 72,000 Canadians here. Harry’s battery has been picked out as the best so Harry and the boys think they will be the first to leave for France, but it may not be for a long time, and it may be soon as they don’t tell them, they do not even know which way they are going till they get out of the gate in the morning.  There are a lot of soldier’s wives here. I will be very thankful when the war is over and we can come back home again”.

Passenger lists to Canada show H. Richardson returning to Aylmer, landing May 14, 1916 at Quebec.  An article in the Aylmer Express, May 25, 1916 tells of his welcome home:

HARRY RICHARDSON IS GIVEN BIG WELCOME

30th Battery, Citizens’ Band, Public School Cadets, and Citizens Turn Out to Welcome Driver Harry Richardson Home from the Front  Addresses of Welcome by Mayor Mann and

Rev. Charles Miles

Sunday was a day long to be remembered by every citizen in Aylmer and many from the surrounding district.  Information was received here on Saturday morning that Driver Harry John Richardson was to arrive in London on Sunday, and immediately steps were taken by our citizens to welcome him home.

Driver Richardson, with 27 other Western Ontario men, arrived in London on Sunday afternoon, when the party was photographed and interviewed by reporters. He was met in London by Mrs. Richardson, his brother, Bert Richardson, of the 91st Battalion, C.E.F., St. Thomas; W. H. Finch and John Wilson, who brought him to Aylmer by motor.

A monster parade was organized at the Post Office at 4:15, and headed by the Citizens’ Band, who were followed by the Cadets, the 30th Battery, a number of overseas men, and hundreds of citizens marched to the High School to meet the returned soldier. When the car drove up, the band played “God Save the King”, and three cheers from hundreds of voices filled the air.

The procession then marched back to the Post Office, where addresses of welcome were given by Mayor Mann and Rev. Charles Miles, rector of Trinity Church, to which Driver Richardson replied and thanked the people for the kindness shown him.  He said he was glad to be home again, but still very glad he went to the Front, and felt it was an experience every man should have. He would like to see every man in khaki, and hoped soon to be back on the firing line again; and certainly would be if permitted to do so.

After many warm handshakes, the parade then accompanied him to his home on St. George Street, where the band played, “There’s No Place Like Home”.

Driver Richardson arrived in Quebec on the Missanabie on the 15th inst., together with some 300 other men returning from active service as convalescents.  He spent the remainder of the week in Quebec passing examinations, etc., and on Saturday entrained for home.

In November 1914, Driver Richardson left Aylmer with 20 other local men, and joined the 16th Battery, C.E.F., and on reaching England they were attached to the 4th Brigade, under the command of Colonel Brown of this place.  Some few months later (in fact, the 4th Brigade was one of the first Canadian Brigades to be sent to the Front) they went to Belgium, where they have been in constant action ever since, and have been fortunate in suffering very few casualties.

Driver Richardson has seen active service at Dickybusch, Kemmel, Veerstradt, Ypres, St. Eloi, Neuve Eclic, Armontieres, and many other places in Belgium.

On 17th December 1915, he received injuries which nearly proved fatal. The Germans had been bombarding their positions very heavily for several days, and the noise and confusion of bursting shells had worked the horses up to such a state of nervous excitement that they were practically frantic. Driver Richardson was some distance back from the guns, grooming his horse, and as he went to put the brush on it, the animal kicked him, with the result that he is still suffering from internal injuries. He was taken to England, and has been in the hospital there ever since, until sent home to recuperate. He has been operated on five times in England, and is hoping against hope that a sixth operation will not be necessary.

He is most anxious to get back to the Front, and as soon as able he will likely be attached to an ambulance corps. He has been recommended for a commission, and his many friends think he deserves it and has earned it.

He has been in the thick of the fight and can tell of many interesting adventures and narrow escapes while on active service. On one occasion he was given orders to ride with all possible haste with a despatch to a battery some distance away. He jumped on his horse and was off.  About a quarter of a mile ahead he saw another despatch rider going at full speed and he set out to overtake him.  The roads were very muddy, and he had to turn out to the side to pass a battalion of infantry, who, he said, blessed him up hill and down, because naturally his horse’s hoofs threw much on them; and just as he got past the infantry he saw a shell come across and hit the rider and horse directly ahead of him, and needless to say, they picked the poor fellow up in a basket.  When he came along, his horse simply jumped the big hole the shell had torn in the ground, and on he went. A man must not stop for anything with a despatch. The shells fall so thickly that a man never knows when one will get him.

Another time he was in charge of the captain’s horse just back of the guns. The enemy were bombarding them, and he took the horses to an old barn nearby. A shell burst very close to them, and a big piece of steel came through the barn just clearing his head and also the backs of the horses, barely missing them by an inch. Working with the horses is always dangerous, for they are constantly excited and nervous.

The week previous to his injury, Driver Richardson was asphyxiated by German gas, and it was with difficulty he was revived.  While in Belgium he had the pleasure of visiting his brother in the trenches, whom he had not seen in more than twelve years.

Notwithstanding that Driver Richardson has done his bit, we sincerely trust that he may fully recover from his injuries, and that his cherished wish to again help in crushing the enemy may be realized.

The Aylmer Express of November 30, 1916 contained a photo of Harry with the following caption: “Driver Harry Richardson, who has been convalescing at his home here for the past six months, reported at London on Monday for active service again. He was the first Aylmer man to be invalided home, and is the first to recuperate and return to active service.”

Harry John Richardson died on April 22, 1946 in London as the result of injuries from an accident at the age of 63.  His wife Clara Pressnail was born in 1883 and died March 25, 1948.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Harry’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 25, 1946:

HARRY RICHARDSON DIES FOLLOWING ACCIDENT

Aylmer Man Crushed by Truck at Air School

Mr. Harry Richardson, who was badly injured last Thursday at the Aylmer Air School, when he was run over by a truck, passed away on Monday afternoon at Victoria Hospital, London.  He was 62 years of age on April 12th this year and was born in Hove, Sussex, England, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Henry Richardson. He came to Canada 39 years ago and followed the trade of a bricklayer.  He had been employed at the Airport since its opening in 1941.  A member of the Anglican Church, the deceased was also a member of Canadian Legion, Branch No. 81, Aylmer.  Left to mourn are his wife, in Aylmer, and three sisters in England. The funeral will be held from the Allen Funeral Home, Talbot Street East on Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Interment will be in the Aylmer cemetery.  Members of the Canadian Legion and returned men are asked to meet at the Funeral Home at 2:20 o’clock.  Medals and berets will be worn where possible. As many members as possible are asked to attend and bring their cars.

Carter Roberts

Carter Roberts was born on February 20, 1892 in Grenville County, North Carolina, the son of Charles J. Roberts & Ada B. Waller.  The family is found on the 1900 census in Dutchville, Grenville County, North Carolina.  

Carter served in the United States Army during the war, and came to Canada in 1920.  He died on January 31, 1976 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, February 4, 1976:

CARTER ROBERTS

Carter Roberts of 49 Chestnut Street West, Aylmer died at Aylmer Nursing Home on Saturday, January 31st. He was 83 years of age.  Mr. Roberts was born in Grenville County, North Carolina on February 20, 1892. He was a son of the late Charles Roberts and Ada Waller.  He came to Canada in 1920 and worked for Imperial Tobacco Company in Aylmer for many years until his retirement several years ago.  He served in the United States Army during the First World War.

He is survived by one sister, Mrs. William (Clara) Umstead of Durham, North Carolina and by several nieces and nephews.  The funeral service was held at H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer, on Tuesday, February 3rd, conducted by the Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church, Aylmer. Burial was in Aylmer cemetery.

Eric Alton Roberts

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Eric Roberts was born on September 10, 1891 at Lyons, the son of William Findlay Roberts (1845-1926) & Margaret Amelia Bryce (1853-1938).  William Roberts was born in South Dorchester, the son of Henry & Jennet Roberts, and was farming in South Dorchester when he was married on April 20, 1880 in Essex Centre, Colchester Township, Essex County to Margaret Bryce, also of South Dorchester, the daughter of James & Eliza Bryce.  They are buried in Stewart Cemetery, South Dorchester.

Eric moved to Toronto where he was an electrician living at 43 Dundonald Street when he enlisted for service on June 14, 1916 in Toronto with the 70th Battery.

Following the war, Eric moved to Peterborough where he was living at 531 Park Street, an electrician, when he was married on March 2, 1922 in Ottawa to Jessie Forbes, a native of Aberchirder, Scotland, daughter of Arthur Forbes & Elizabeth Ritchie.

Eric died in 1972 and is buried in Mount Evergreen Cemetery, Murray Township, Northumberland County.

 

Frederick Roberts

123545  Fred Roberts

The name Fred Roberts is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916.  He is also referred to in an article on the occasion of James Glover’s 50th wedding anniversary as being a co-worker at the Carnation Company in Aylmer, who also enlisted for service.

Frederick Roberts was born on November 22, 1875 in Clophill, Bedfordshire, England, the son of Leonard Roberts & Mary Ann Kedge.  He was married in 1898 to May Florence Broome (1874-1961) in London, England. He and his wife are found on the 1901 census in Northwest Fulham, London, England, with one son, Arthur Frederick (born 1898)  Frederick was a labourer in building.  His wife Mary Florence was born in Kensington, London. Two more children were born to them while living in England: Florence May (1901), and Maud Hilda (1902). 

Passenger lists show that Frederick, his wife and three children left Liverpool on the ship Canada and arrived in Montreal on June 29, 1907.  Their destination was Toronto.  They are found on the 1911 census in Aylmer, where Frederick is employed as a railroad section labourer.  Another daughter, Phyllis Violet Mary, was born in Ontario in 1911.

Frederick enlisted for service on September 18, 1915 in Aylmer.  He had served one year in the 30th Battery in Aylmer.  His wife Florence moved to St. Thomas where she was living when their son, Arthur Frederick Roberts, enlisted for service there on January 18, 1916.  He was killed in action on July 14, 1917.

A photo of Fred with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “L.-Corp. Fred Roberts was born in England 41 years ago. He and his son, Pte. Arthur Roberts, enlisted with the 91st Batt., and went overseas in June last. He was employed at the Condenser previous to enlisting. His wife and five children reside in St. Thomas”.

A letter from Fred was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, September 14, 1916:

London, August 4

Mr. Sid Sheppard:
Dear Friend – Just a few lines to let you know that I am still in the land of the living. I was up to London last Sunday and the wife’s sister had written to Billie Butcher to come and see them for the day, so, I thought I was in luck, so her and I went up to the station to meet him but he never came. I was disappointed. Maybe he will come when I get up there next time. She said he was getting along fine the last time she saw him and she said that his sister was there so she didn’t have much to say to him. We expect to have a good time with him. We are attached to the 12th Batt. as you will see by the address. We are having lovely weather here, but very hot. It was 101 in the sun the other day. We see some lovely sights. Talk about flowers, this is the place. We are getting lots of new potatoes and say I had a fine lot of braced beans and peas last Sunday and there are lots of nut bushes and black berries around here that will be fine after awhile. Well, old pal, I suppose the wife and the kiddies are well on the way by now and will be safely in England when you get this. I hope she came down and paid you a visit before she left. I don’t know whether she will like if over here or not, but her mother is longing to see her. The poor old lady was badly cut up last Sunday so that may make a great difference. Remember me to Jim Firby, Smithy and Jack Strachan if you see them. I think this is all for this time, so I must close.

I remain, yours truly, F. Roberts. No. 123545, 12th Batt., C.E.F., London, England.

Frederick returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 21.  He had served with the 70th Battalion, and was returning to his wife in St. Thomas.

Frederick died on July 15, 1954 at the age of 81 and is buried beside his wife in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue.  His inscription reads: 

“Frederick Roberts, Lance Corp., 2 Battn. C. E. F.  July 15, 1954, age 81″

Frederick’s obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, July 15, 1954:

FREDERICK ROBERTS 91ST BATTALION MAN

Frederick Roberts, whose home was at 12 Talbot street, died Thursday morning in Westminster Hospital, London, Ont., in his 82nd year. Mr. Roberts, a veteran of the 91st Battalion who transferred to the 2nd Battalion, C.E.F., for service in France, had suffered a long illness.

Mr. Roberts was a native of Bedfordshire, Eng., born there on Nov. 22, 1872, a son of the late Mary Ann Kedge and Leonard Roberts. When he came to Canada in 1907, he first resided at Corinth, then at Aylmer, and he came to St. Thomas in 1916.  His home had been here ever since. Mr. Roberts’ wife, who survives, was the former Florence Broome. There are one son and four daughters also surviving: Cyril Roberts, 93 Woodworth avenue; Mrs. Reid (Florence) Campbell, 120 Alma street; Mrs. Palmer H. (Maude) Brown of Hempstead, N.Y.; Mrs. Arnold (Phyllis) Robb, London, Ont.; and Mrs. George (Doris) Kelly, London, Ont.  There are two sisters living in England and Mr. Roberts is also survived by 12 grandchildren. One son, Arthur, was killed overseas in World War I while serving with the 18th Battalion, C.E.F.

The remains are resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home where the funeral service Saturday at two p.m. will be conducted by Rev. A. L. Manley, who is supplying as rector at St. John’s Anglican Church. Interment will be made in St. Thomas cemetery.

Herbert Ray Roberts

189541  Ray Roberts

Herbert Ray Roberts was born on December 29, 1900 in Sparta, the son of John Roberts (1874-1959) & Mary Della Berdan (1870-1915). John was born in Birmingham, England the son of John Roberts & Kate Pinner.  Mary was born in Malahide, the daughter of Jacob Berdan & Lucinda Hunter.  They are buried in Luton cemetery.

Herbert Ray Roberts was a farmer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on December 4, 1915 in St. Thomas. He enlisted underage, giving his date of birth as December 29, 1897.

Following the war, he moved to Detroit about 1923  where he was living when he was married on November 27, 1924 to Bernice Louise Geer (1908-1993), of Clio, Michigan. They are found on the 1930 census in Detroit.  Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 4, 1924:

Herbert Ray Roberts, of Detroit, son of Mr and Mrs John Roberts, Aylmer, and Miss Bernice Louise Geer, of Clio, Michigan, were married in Clio on November 27th. Mr and Mrs Roberts will reside in Detroit, where the groom has a responsible position. They are at present spending a few days with Mr Roberts’ parents in Aylmer and other relatives and friends in this vicinity.

Herbert Ray Roberts died on June 21, 1963 and is buried with his wife in Luton Cemetery.

His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 22, 1963:

RAY ROBERTS, AYLMER AREA FLORIST, DIES

Aylmer – Ray Roberts, R.R. 2 Aylmer, well known area florist, died at his home suddenly Friday following a heart attack. Born in Sparta 62 years ago, he spent most of his life in the district.  He was a son of the late John Roberts and Mary Berdan.  He served overseas with the 91st Battalion during World War 1.  He is survived by his wife, the former Bernice Gere; two brothers, Frank, St. Thomas, and Maurice, R.R. 5 Aylmer.  Resting at the James H. Barnum Funeral Home where service will be held on Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. Fred M. Ward, of the Aylmer Baptist Church, will officiate. Interment will be made in Luton cemetery.

Milton John Roberts

3137788  Milton Roberts

Milton John Roberts was born on September 30, 1897 in Malahide, the son of John Robert Roberts (1855-1937) & Theresa Maria Simpson (1865-1929).  John Roberts was born in Malahide, but living in Bayham when he was married on January 2, 1884 in Malahide to Theresa Roberts, a Malahide native and resident, daughter of Edwin Simpson & Elizabeth Bentley.

The family lived on the Jamestown Road near Copenhagen before moving to the Crossley-Hunter community in South Dorchester between 1901 and 1911.  

Milton enlisted for service on June 6, 1918 after passing a medical exam in London on October 13, 1917.  He was a farmer living at R. R. #3 Belmont and was not married.

The St. Thomas Times-Journal of  March 31, 1919 reports: “Pte. Milton Roberts, son of Mr and Mrs Wm. Roberts, arrived home Friday.  He had his discharge and is glad to be a civilian again”

Milton moved to Detroit where he died on August 18, 1951. He is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his parents.  His obituary appeared in a local newspaper:

MILTON JOHN ROBERTS PASSES AT DETROIT

AYLMER, Aug. 20 – Milton John Roberts, 1443 Muir Strreet, Hazel Park, Detroit, died suddenly in hospital in that city on Saturday. Mr. Roberts, a son of the late Mr and Mrs John Roberts of Lyons, the departed man was born in Orwell on September 30, 1897 and thus was in his 54th year.  He was a member of the United Church of Canada and prior to going to Detroit 25 years ago where he was engaged in the trucking industry, he lived in Orwell and Lyons.  Surviving are one son, Howard of Detroit; two daughters, Mrs. Van (Ruby) Page of Detroit; Miss Dolores Roberts at home; one sister, Mrs. Roy Legg of Kingsmill and two brothers, George and Aaron of Lyons. At rest at the Hughson Funeral Home, Aylmer, from Tuesday morning for funeral service on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m.  Interment in Aylmer Cemetery.

 

Wilfred Frederick Roberts

3138015   

Wilfred Roberts was born on February 18, 1895 at Copenhagen in Malahide, the son of Frederick Ernest Roberts (1868-1955) and Emma Cecelia Jones (1874-1966).  Frederick Roberts was the son of Robert Roberts & Mary E. Robbins, and was married on November 14, 1891 to Emma Jones, the daughter of Richard Jones & Julia Baughman.  They farmed at lot 8, concession 2, Malahide.

Wilfred was married on March 20, 1918 in Aylmer to Grace Mae McConnell (1900-1942), of Aylmer, the daughter of Henry McConnell & Amy Widdifield.

.Wilfred was farming at R. R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 11, 1918.

Wilfred continued to live in the Copenhagen area, and following the death of his wife he was living in London when he was  married in Centre Burlington, Nova Scotia, on September 4, 1943 to Edith Avora Sanford, of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Edith was a graduate of Western King’s Memorial Hospital in Berwick, Nova Scotia, and was on the staff at the Queen Alexandra Sanitarium in London. She passed away in 1965. On September 7, 1966 Wilfred was married to Mrs. Blanche Blake.  According to his obituary he also served in World War II, and lived in Nova Scotia after the war before returning to the Aylmer area.

Wilfred died on May 11, 1983 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his first wife Grace.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 18, 1983:

Wilfred Roberts

Wilfred F. Roberts died May 11, 1983 in St. Thomas. He was born in Malahide Township February 18, 1895 and was the son of the late Frederick and Emma (Jones) Roberts.  He was raised and lived in Copenhagen and Aylmer.  Mr. Roberts served in the Army during World War II in Canada and overseas.  On his return he resided in Nova Scotia for a number of years and then returned to Aylmer.  He was a long standing member of the United Church.  Mr. Roberts was predeceased by his wives Grace McConnell, Avora Sandford, Blanche Blake, and Fern Bottrill. He is survived by his son Donald of St. Thomas; daughters Mrs. Robert (Irene) Marcus of Agincourt; Mrs. Richard (Cynthia) McEown of Aylmer; 6 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren; a sister Mrs. Robert (Edna) Kennedy of Calton and numerous nieces and nephews.  The funeral was conducted from H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Saturday May 14, 1983 by Norman Hare of Malahide United Church.  Burial followed in the Aylmer cemetery.  Pallbearers were Harold Parsons, Fred McQuiggan, Raymond Kennedy, Robert Marcus, Gary Roberts, Ken Roberts.

Myron Oswald Robertson

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Myron Robertson was born on March 12, 1894 at Kingsmill in Malahide, the son of John O. Robertson & Ellenor Pettit.  John was born in Valetta, Kent County, the son of Andrew & Jane Robertson, and was living there when he was married on September 17, 1884 in South Dorchester to Ellenor Pettit, a native of South Dorchester, daughter of George & Christina Pettit.   John was a merchant, and operated a bakery in Aylmer and a hotel at Lyons.  The family is found on the 1901 South Dorchester census.  John & Ellenor moved to Detroit where they are found on the 1910 census.  By 1911, John was widowed and living in Medicine Hat, Alberta with his son Myron where they were farmers.  John appears to have returned to Detroit where he was living in 1918 when Myron enlisted.

Myron Robertson was living at Sunnynook, Alberta when he enlisted for service on July 26, 1918 in Calgary.  He was a farmer and was not married.  He names his next of kin as his father, John O. Robertson of Detroit.

No further information can be found.

Charles Edward Robins

503001

Charles Robins was born on March 24, 1887 in Aylmer, the son of Edward Robins & Ella Jane Grass.  Edward was born in Bayham, the son of Caleb & Deborah Robins, and was a tinsmith and cooper living in Aylmer when he was married on June 17, 1884 in Tillsonburg to Ella Grass, a native of Malahide living in Aylmer, the daughter of Francis & Martha Grass. They moved to London where they are found on the 1901 census, and later to Detroit about 1905.

Charles was a carpenter living at 39 Greenwood Ave., Detroit when he enlisted for service on February 12, 1916 in Windsor.  He names his next of kin as his father, Edward Robins, of 27 Sterling Place, Detroit.

Following the war, Charles returned to Detroit where he was employed by a slate roofing firm.  He is found on the 1930 Detroit census with his wife Clara, and two children, Charles E. (Born about 1925) and Vernon C. (Born about 1926).

Charles died in May 1964 in Michigan.

Thomas Edward Robins

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Thomas was born in 1867 in Scotland, Brant County., the son of Christopher Robins & Sarah Ann Gilmore. Sarah and her sons Thomas, Joseph, David & John are found on the 1881 census in Bayham, where she is a widow. She died on October 29, 1890 at the age of 68 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. Thomas is found on the 1901 census in South Dorchester, living with Roland & Mary Putnam, working as a farm labourer.  On the 1911 census, there is a Thomas E. Robbins, born May 1868, boarding with David & Harriet Davies in Bertie Township, Welland Co.  He is a farmer.

Thomas was living in Aylmer when he was married on May 2, 1889 in Port Bruce to Elvaretta Ryckman, a native of Bayham, living in Aylmer. They are found on the 1891 census in Aylmer. It is not known what happened to Elvaretta, as by 1915 Thomas lists himself as “single”.

Thomas’  name is found in a list of recruits for the 16th Battery, C.F.A., printed in the Aylmer Express, February 25, 1915. He is described as a farmer, single, of Aylmer. 

Thomas enlisted for service in Aylmer on February 20, 1915.  He names his next of kin as William Smith Robins, of St. Thomas (Inkerman & Wilson Street).  The relationship is not stated. He gives his date of birth as May 12, 1870. He had served three years in the 25th Battery.  The attestation paper is witnessed by L. F. Clarke, of the 30th Battery, C.F.A., Aylmer.

Thomas was injured in 1916 and honorably discharged. He arrived home from overseas at Quebec on November 20, 1916.  His return home was reported in the Aylmer Express, November 30, 1916:

DRIVER TOM ROBINS GIVEN WARM RECEPTION

Returned From Front on Monday Night, Welcomed by Mayor and Citizens

Another of Aylmer’s men who has done his “bit” at the front, Driver Tom Robins, returned home on the 10:30 G.T.R. train Monday night. Although it was not known until a late hour that he would arrive, a large crowd of citizens, headed by the Citizen’s Band were at the station to welcome him home and when the train pulled in, three cheers were given the returned soldier. On returning to town the parade halted in front of the post office were addresses of warm welcome were given by Mayor W. J. Mann, Rev. W. G. Charlton and Rev. A. E. M. Thomson, who thanked Driver Robins on behalf of the citizens, for the splendid service he has rendered his country. In the auto with Driver Robins were his brother and wife, Mr and Mrs David Robins.

Driver Robins enlisted some eighteen months ago with the 16th Battery, 4th Brigade, at Guelph, and later was transferred to the 12th Battery, 3rd Brigade, 1st Division. A year ago in May he went to France, and was in active service for ten months.  He was slightly wounded, but the bullet he received was almost spent, and although an operation was necessary, it was nothing serious. He has been honorably discharged on account of his age, but has the right spirit, and says he will sure go back again, rather than see the dirty yellow Hun win out.

It was also planned to give Pte. Isaac Williams, who returned home unannounced on Friday of last week, a reception at the same time, but he was ordered back to London on Monday by the military authorities.

Thomas died on June 6, 1940 in London at the age of 73 years and 26 days. He was a resident of Malahide at the time of his death, and is buried in Aylmer Cemetery.  The inscription on his monument reads: “Driver Thomas E. Robins, C.F.A., C.E.F. 6th June 1940 Rest in Peace”

His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 13, 1940:

THOMAS ROBINS

Thomas E. Robins, a well-known resident of the Aylmer district for practically all his life, died in the Westminster Hospital, London, on Thursday afternoon, June 6th, following an illness of about two years. He was in his 74th year and was born in Brant County, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Christopher Robins. He came to this district as a young man and had resided in Aylmer, Malahide township and Brownsville practically all his life. Mr. Robins was a veteran of the first Great War and served his country overseas. He was an adherent of the Baptist Church.

Surviving are one step-daughter, Hattie; two brothers, David Robins of Malahide, and John Robins of Aylmer. There are several nephews and nieces.

The funeral service was held on Saturday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. at the Allen Funeral Home. Rev. L. E. Mason was in charge of the largely attended service. The pall bearers were W. G. Robins, W. H. Robins, Chas. A. Robins, Harry D. Robins, Albert B. Slaght and Charles Partlow. Relatives and friends attended from St. Thomas, Aylmer and Malahide. Interment was made in the Aylmer cemetery.

Cecil John Robinson

53725

Cecil John Robinson was born on November 7, 1892 in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of John R. Robinson & Mary Louise Tossell.  He was a printer living in Toronto when he was married there on June 16, 1911 to Maud Ethel Hudson, also of Toronto, the daughter of Joseph Hudson & Emily Murgatroyd.

He was a printer employed at the office of the East Elgin Reformer newspaper in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on October 31, 1914 in St. Thomas.  He had served one year with the 30th Battery, C.F.A. in Aylmer.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Maud E. Robinson, of Aylmer.

The East Elgin Tribune of May 11, 1916 reported that Cecil had been killed in action.

Harry Edward Robinson

269999

Harry Robinson was born on May 7, 1897 in Straffordville, the son of James Isaac Robinson & Jennie S. House.  James was born in Houghton Township, the son of Isaac & Mary Etta Robinson and was farming there when he was married on June 3, 1896 in Bayham to Jennie House, a native of Dorchester living in Bayham, the daughter of Henry & Catherine.  They moved to Saskatchewan where they were living in 1918.

Harry was a farmer living with his parents at Imperial, Saskatchwan when he enlisted for service on June 1, 1918 in Regina.   No further information is known.

Alfred Leland Rogers

925526  Alfred Leland Rogers

The name “Fred Rogers” is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.

Alfred Leland Rogers was born on May 6, 1893 in Malahide, the son of Augustus S. Rogers (1858-1925) & Susie T. Pound (1864-1897).  Augustus was born in Newmarket, Ont., the son of Amos Rogers & Esther Shaw, and was living in Malahide when he was married there on September 11, 1888 to Susie Pound, also of Malahide, the daughter William Pound & Susan Phelps.  The family is found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Malahide.  Augustus & Susie are buried in Sparta (south) cemetery. Note that Fred’s obituary states he was born in Sparta, but his birth registration says Malahide.

Alfred’s attestation paper is not available for viewing, but his service number was 925526. Information received from his family states that he enlisted in Weyburn, Saskatchewan and served two years overseas with the 5th Battalion of Canadian Infantry. He was wounded in France on April 28, 1917, which ended his military service.  Passenger lists show Pte. A. L. Rogers, with the above number, invalided home to Canada from Kirkdale hospital suffering from a gunshot wound to the left thigh.  He arrived in Halifax on November 27, 1917. 

He was married to Marjory Shepherd of Weyburn, and had three children.  Kathleen and Douglas were born in Saskatchewan and Marion was born in Aylmer.  Fred was the postmaster in Aylmer for ten years (1926-1936). 

Alfred died on December 15, 1977 and is buried in Sparta (south) Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, December 16, 1977:

L. ROGERS

L. (Fred) Rogers, formerly of the Sparta and Aylmer districts, passed away at Westminster Hospital on Thursday following ailing health.  Born in Sparta on May 6, 1893, son of the late A. S. and Susie (Pound) Rogers. He was 84 years old.

He lived most of his life in St. Thomas and was a member of the Aylmer Baptist Church.  He served overseas during the First World War.  His wife, the late Marjorie Rogers passed away in 1971.  Survived by one son, Douglas Rogers, Sudbury; two daughters, Mrs. Harold (Kathleen) Johnson, London, and Mrs. Norman (Marion) Hukish, Toronto; two sisters, Mrs. Roy (Julia) Parkes, 100 Erie St., St. Thomas, and Mrs. Evelyn Cohoon, Toronto. Also survived by eight grandchildren, Karen, Wayne and Kirk Johnson; Jim Rogers and Brian, Rod, Paul, and Debbie Vallas and a number of nieces and nephews.  Two brothers, Walter and Amos Rogers, died previously.

Resting at the Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin St., St. Thomas, where funeral service will be held Saturday at 1:30 p.m. by Rev. Gordon Finlay of the Broderick Street Baptist Church officiating. Interment in Sparta cemetery.

Lorin David Rogers

3138053

The name “Lorne Rogers” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Kingsmill.

Lorin David Rogers was born on December 18, 1895 at Gladstone in North Dorchester township, Middlesex County, the son of Albert Richard Rogers (1857-1934) & Anna Saphrona Glover (1867-1932).  Albert was the son of Richard & Elizabeth Rogers, and was farming in North Dorchester when he was married on June 29, 1885 in Mt. Brydges to Saphrona Glover, of Caradoc, the daughter of David & Esther Glover.  They are found on the 1901 and 1911 census in South Dorchester.  Albert & Saphrona are buried in Mapleton cemetery.

Lorin Rogers was farming at R.R. #3 Belmont when he enlisted for service on June 11, 1918 in London.

He was farming in North Dorchester township when he was married on February 20, 1920 in South Dorchester to Muriel Irene Manning (1892-1982), a native of Dunwich township living in South Dorchester, the daughter of Wallace J. Manning & Effie Smith.

Lorne died on September 4,  1957 and is buried with his wife Muriel in Dorchester Union cemetery. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, September 5, 1957:

ROGERS – At Victoria Hospital on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 1957, Lorne Rogers, of RR 2 Belmont, beloved husband of Muriel Rogers, aged 62 years; dear father of Clare, at home; and (Muriel) Mrs. Glen smith, Wilton Grove. Resting at the R. A. Logan and Son Funeral Home, Dorchester, where service will be held on Friday, September 6 at 2:30 p.m.  Interment Dorchester Union Cemetery.

Thomas Rogers

727286

Thomas Rogers was born on April 24, 1895 in London, England.  His parents’ names are unknown.  He emigrated to Canada as a “Home Child” at the age of 16, leaving Liverpool on the ship Corsican on July 26, 1912 and arriving in Canada on August 3, 1912.  He travelled with the Macpherson group, whose destination was Stratford. 

Thomas was farming in Downie Township, Perth County when he was married on July 7, 1916 in Stratford to Florence Desjardins, of London, Ontario.  

There are two attestation papers for Thomas. The first one is dated January 8, 1916 in Stratford, where Thomas is a farmer, single, living at RR #2 St. Paul’s in Perth County.  The second attestation paper is dated November 17, 1916 in London.  He is a farmer living in Springfield with his wife Florence.

No further information is known.

 

Glen Rohrer

270509  Glenn Rohrer

Glen Rohrer was born on December 11, 1898 in North Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, the son of Oliver Henry Rohrer (1859-1942) & Sarah A. Foster (1862-1935).  Oliver was born in Walsingham, the son of John N. & Rachel, and was farming there when he was married on March 11, 1882 in Tillsonburg to Sarah Foster, also of Walsingham, the daughter of H. N. & Caroline Foster.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Walsingham, but by the 1911 census, they had moved to Malahide Township. Oliver & Sarah are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Glen moved to Brantford and was living with his brother Ray at 201 Market Street, when he enlisted for service there on May 27, 1916. He was a labourer, and belonged to the 38th “D” Rifles.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Sarah, of Aylmer.  He enlisted with the 215th Battalion.

Glen returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on July 24. He moved to Michigan about 1923 where he is found on the 1930 census living in Garden City, Wayne County.  He was employed as a machine operator in an auto factory.  He married his wife Mildred M. about 1924. Two children are with them on the census:  Donald G. (Born about 1925), and Gordon W. (Born about 1927).

Glen died on August 23, 1948 in his 50th year.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 26, 1948:

GLENN ROHRER DIES IN DETROIT, MICH.

Visited Here Last Week

Glenn Rohrer, son of the late Mr and Mrs Oliver Rohrer, died suddenly in Detroit on Monday afternoon. He had not been in too good health, having suffered a heart ailment.  The departed man visited Aylmer relatives Thursday and Friday of last week and then went on to London, Ont. for a visit prior to returning home by motor with his wife on Sunday.  Earlier in the week he had been to Stratford.

Mr. Rohrer, who was in his 50th year, was formerly employed by the Chevrolet division of General Motors Corporation. During the Great War he served overseas with the 54th Kootenay Battalion from British Columbia.

Surviving are his wife, two sons, Gordon and Donald; three brothers, Ross, of Aylmer; Ray of Stratford; and Leslie of St. Thomas, and three sisters, Miss Hazel Rohrer and Mrs. Ed. Wiley of Aylmer, and Mrs. G. W. Mills of London, Ont.  The funeral is taking place in Detroit Thursday afternoon.

 

John Ray Rohrer

270473  Ray Rohrer

Ray Rohrer was born on March 20, 1896 in North Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, the son of Oliver Henry Rohrer (1859-1942) & Sarah A. Foster (1862-1935).  Oliver was born in Walsingham, the son of John N. & Rachel, and was farming there when he was married on March 11, 1882 in Tillsonburg to Sarah Foster, also of Walsingham, the daughter of H. N. & Caroline Foster.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Walsingham, but by the 1911 census, they had moved to Malahide Township. Oliver & Sarah are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Ray moved to Brantford where he was living at 201 Market Street when he enlisted for service on June 26, 1916 in Burford.  He was a teamster, and belonged to the 38th “D” Rifles.  He enlisted with the 215th Battalion. He names his next of kin as his father, Oliver, of Aylmer.

The Aylmer Express of October 17, 1918 contains a photo of Ray with the following caption:

Pte. Ray Rohrer, who returned home from overseas last Thursday. Pte. Rohrer went across with the 153rd Battalion and some months ago was severely wounded in France and sent to England, where for a time his life was despaired of. He has a brother, Glenn, still on active service.

Ray continued his trade as a teamster and was again living in Brantford when he was married there on March 17, 1919 to Jessie Bella Wannamaker (1899-1978), a native of Picton, Ont., living in Brantford, the daughter of William Wannamaker & Jessie Shaw.

Ray died on February 5, 1971 and is buried in Avondale Cemetery Stratford. In addition to the family monument, a military marker is located in the plot with the following inscription:

“John Ray Rohrer, Pte., 38 Battn. C.E.F.  5 Feb 1971 age 74″

His obituary appeared in the Stratford Beacon Herald, February 6, 1971:

JOHN R. ROHRER

John Ray Rohrer, 74, of 24 Inverness St., died Friday in Westminster Hospital, London.  He was born in Norfolk County, the son of the late Mr and Mrs Oliver Rohrer. He lived in Brantford and moved to Stratford 33 years ago.

He was in the car department of the Canadian National Railways for 17 years, retiring in 1960.  He was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion, Stratford Branch 8.

He is survived by his wife, the former Bella Wannamaker, sons James, of 138 Norfolk St.,; Richard, 24 Inverness St., and Peter, 45 West Gore St., and daughters, Mrs. William (Audrey) Stocker, of Manistique, Mich.; Mrs. Arthur (Hazel) Bessey; Mrs. Norman (Jessie) Hayhurst; Mrs. James (Irene) Sinclair; Mrs. Barbara Hodge, all of Brantford; Mrs. Kenneth (Marion) Mills, 28 Cherry St.; Mrs. Maxwell (Mariene) Sawiezky, 11 Stratford St.; Mrs. Charles (Lillian) Bain of Edmonton, Alta; and a brother Ross Rohrer of Aylmer, and sisters, Miss Hazel Rohrer, of Aylmer, and Mrs. Gordon (Iva) Mills of London. Also survived by 33 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.

The body will be at the Heinbuck Funeral Home, after 7:30 p.m. Saturday where the funeral service will be held Monday at 1:30 p.m. Burial will follow in Avondale Cemetery.

Edgar Llewellyn Roloson

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Edgar Roloson was born on July 12, 1896 in Bayham, the son of William Henry Roloson (1875-1971) & Alma May Webber (1880-1963).  William was born in Bayham, the son of Charles Roloson & Mary Millard, and was farming there when he was married on February 19, 1895 in Vienna to Alma Webber, also of Bayham, the daughter of Calvin Webber & Mary Harner.  They later moved to the Springfield area, and are buried in Springfield cemetery.

Edgar was a farmer living at Brownsville when he enlisted for service on June 11, 1918.

In 1959 he was living at 41 Locust Street, St. Thomas. He died in 1979 and is buried in Springfield cemetery.

Joseph Orval (Orville) Roloson

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Joseph Roloson was born on July 29, 1897 in Bayham, the son of Aaron Fernando Roloson (1862-1945) & Esther Margaret Scanlan (1868-1922).  Aaron was born in Bayham, the son of Brockway & Margaret Roloson and was farming there when he was married on November 5, 1889 in Straffordville to Esther Scanlan, also of Bayham, the daughter of William Scanlan & Mary Hoshal.  They are buried in Richmond West cemetery.

Joseph Orval Roloson was a farmer living at R.R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on July 29, 1918 in London.

He died at Glenmeyer in 1961 and is buried in Richmond West cemetery, but there is no marker.

 

William Charles Roloson

190251 / 3138056  Charles Roloson

William Charles Roloson was born on September 6, 1895 in Bayham, the son of Charles Aaron Roloson (1868-1941) & Della (Dilley) Mary Ruth Wall (1875-1940).  Charles was born in Bayham, the son of Charles & Mary Roloson, and was farming there when he was married on May 27, 1891 in Bayham to Della Wall, a native of Malahide living in Bayham, the daughter of James & Delilah Wall.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

William was farming at RR #1 Vienna when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on March 24, 1916 in Port Burwell.  He served two months and was discharged.  He enlisted again for service on June 11, 1918 in London.

William was married on October 30, 1920 in Aylmer to Helen Ray Marlatt (1906-1960), the daughter of Tillman Marlatt & Plezzie Johnson. Following Helen’s death, he was married to Violet G. Hayward.  

William died on August 6, 1966 in Tillsonburg Memorial Hospital. He & Helen are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, August 10, 1964:

CHARLES WILLIAM ROLOSON

Charles William Roloson of RR 1 Delhi, passed away in Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Friday, August 5, 1966, in his 71st year. A farmer and carpenter, he was born in Vienna on September 6, 1895. He was an area resident most of his life.

He is survived by his wife, the former Violet Babcock; four daughters, Mrs. Lou (Pearl) Pietro and Mrs. Harvey (Essa May) Brock of Brantford; Mrs. Steve (Thelma) Cukrovani of Sarnia; and Mrs. Larry (Ella) Merault of Riviere du Loup, Que.; one stepdaughter, Mrs. Harry (Dorothy) Bates of Grafton; four sons, Charles Roloson and William Roloson of Brantford; Jack Roloson of Delhi and Bruce Roloson of Simcoe; two stepsons, Aubrey Babcock of Otterville and Douglas Babcock of Delhi; three sisters, Mrs. Lorne (Lila) Learn of Simcoe; Mrs. Henry (Stella) Blake of Detroit, and Mrs. Clifton (Leola) Brinn of Tillsonburg; three brothers, Clarence Roloson of Simcoe; Kenneth Roloson of Kingston and Louis Roloson of Windsor.

Funeral service was held at the Shine Funeral Home, Delhi, on Monday at 2 p.m. conducted by Rev. John Amy of Delhi.  Pallbearers were Harry Bates, William Comer, Tiff Laking, Jack Laking, Jack Guston and Norman Winters. Interment in St. Luke’s Cemetery, Vienna.

Edward Gordon Roper

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Edward Roper’s name is found in an Roll of Honor of men who enlisted, printed in the East Elgin Tribune, March 2, 1916.  He is described as of “Aylmer”.

Edward was born on May 2, 1895 in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England, the son of Jesse & Fanny Roper. The family is found on the 1901 census in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England.

Edward emigrated to Canada in 1914, leaving Liverpool on the ship Andania, arriving in Halifax on April 5. The passenger list states his destination is “Aylmer West” and his occupation will be farming.

Edward enlisted for service on February 26, 1915 in Guelph.  His attestation paper was signed by L. F. Clarke, of the 30th Battery,  Aylmer. He names his next of kin as his father, Jesse Roper, of Preston, Candover, Basingstoke.  He was a farmer, not married, and had served in the Hampshire Cadets.

Edward cannot be found in a passenger list returning to Canada.  It is possible he went back to his home in England.

Harry Rose

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Harry Rose was born on August 20, 1889 in Aylmer, the son of James Edward Rose (1857-1922) & Phoebe A. Land (1857-1940).  James was born in Port Huron, Michigan, the son of James & Harriet Rose, and was a shoemaker in Aylmer in the early 1900’s.  He later moved to St. Thomas where he died at 59 St. Catharine Street. He and Phoebe are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

Harry Rose was living in St. Thomas when he was married on May 5, 1913 to Meta Grace Ramsden, of Windsor, daughter of Edwin Ramsden & Mary Ann Burke.  They later divorced.

Harry was a tinsmith living at 106 Euclid Ave., Toronto when he enlisted for service on October 11, 1918 in Toronto.  He was divorced and names his next of kin as his four year old daughter, Hattie Rose, care of William Rose, 34 Victoria Road, Walkerville, Ontario.

When his mother died in 1940, Harry was living in Los Angeles.  A death record was found for a Harry Rose in Los Angeles on July 15, 1967 at the age of 79.  His date of birth is given as November 20, 1887 in Michigan, and his mother’s maiden name is recorded as “Land”.

Joseph Leigh Routledge

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Joseph Routledge was born on May 11, 1897 at Dashwood in Huron County, the son of Joseph Routledge (1859-1934) & Martha Wilson (1858-1943). Joseph & Martha are buried in St. John’s Anglican Cemetery, Arva.

 Joseph was a bank clerk living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on March 27, 1918 in London.

He returned from overseas on December 14, 1918, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick.

He was a banker living in Exeter when he was married there on October 2, 1920 to Elizabeth Irene Rivers, also of Exeter, the daughter of William Rivers & Elizabeth Hammond.

No further information is known.

Frank Whaley Row (Rowe)

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Frank Row was born on October 30 [or31], 1895 at Avon in South Dorchester,  the son of James Row (1853-1942) & Bertha Adeline Whaley (1855-1935). James Row Sr. was born in England, and came to Canada with his parents in 1855.  He married Bertha Adeline Whaley, daughter of Samuel Cook Whaley & Grace McLachlin.  John & Adeline operated a grocery store in Avon for 38 years. They are buried in New Delmer Cemetery, Delmer, Ontario.

Frank was a farmer living in Belmont when he enlisted for service on April 1, 1916 in Toronto with the 198th Overseas Battalion.

He returned from overseas on May 22, 1919, arriving in Halifax. Following the war, he farmed in North Dorchester where he was married on November 22, 1923 to Marie Eliza Lyons (1902-1992), of South Dorchester, daughter of Harry Lyons & Ida Belle McIver. They had two children, Gerald and Joyce.

Frank died on September 29, 1955 and is buried with his wife in Avon Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, September 30, 1955:

ROWE – At his late residence, 462 Chester street, on Thursday, Sept. 29, 1955, Frank W. Rowe, beloved husband of Marie (Lyons); dear father of Miss Joyce Rowe, at home; and Gerald Rowe, of London; dear brother of Mrs. Harley (Luella) Joliffe, of Mt. Elgin; Miss Clara Rowe and Earl Rowe, both of Avon; and Clarence Rowe, of Battle Creek, Mich.; in his 59th year. Resting at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, Wortley Road at Elmwood Ave., where funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, October 1 at 2 p.m. Interment in Avon Cemetery. Masonic Memorial Service, in charge of Moffat Lodge, No. 339 Harrietsville, will be held at the funeral home Friday evening at 8:30 p.m.

James Clarence Row

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James Row was born on May 23, 1891 at Avon in South Dorchester, the son of James Row (1853-1942) & Bertha Adeline Whaley (1855-1935). James Row Sr. was born in England, and came to Canada with his parents in 1855.  He married Bertha Adeline Whaley, daughter of Samuel Cook Whaley & Grace McLachlin.  John & Adeline operated a grocery store in Avon for 38 years. They are buried in New Delmer Cemetery, Delmer, Ontario.

James Clarence Row was an electrician living at 137 Brainard St., Detroit, when he enlisted for service on May 24, 1918 in London.  It appears that James may also have served with the United States Army, as there is a Draft Registration Card found for him, dated 1917.  His grave marker in the New Delmer Cemetery also contains the following inscription: “James C. Row PFC US Army World War 1, May 23, 1891 – May 25, 1967.

James Clarence Row was not married, and died on May 25, 1967 at Fort Custer, Michigan, at the age of 76.  He is buried in New Delmer Cemetery with his parents. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 31, 1967:

JAMES C. ROW

Service for James Clarence Row, 76, of Battle Creek, Mich., whose death occurred on Thursday, May 25, at the Veteran’s Hospital in Battle Creek, was held Monday afternoon at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, 119 Talbot St. East, Aylmer.  Rev. Edward McCrea of Avon United Church conducted the service during which Mrs. James Wright presided at the organ. The pallbearers were Harold Row, Gerald Row, Arthur Flanders, Donald Fleming, Frank Cornish, Milton Jones. Interment was made in the Delmer cemetery.  Relatives and friends attended from London, Ingersoll, Brant, Mich., Saginaw, Mich., Woodstock, Tillsonburg, Aylmer and district.  Born at Avon, Mr. Row was the son of the late Mr and Mrs James Row, and was a retired electrician.  He lived most of his life in the Battle Creek and Dearborn, Mich. areas.  He left Avon at the age of 18 to join the United States Army during World War I. Surviving is one brother, Earl Row, of Avon; two sisters, Miss Clara Row of Avon, and Mrs. Harvey (Luella) Jolliffe of Mount Elgin.  A number of nieces and nephews also survive.

Cecil Carman Roy

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Cecil Carman Roy was born on October 5, 1903 in Malahide, the son of William M. Roy (1864-1944) & Lottie Guyett.  William was the son of Gideon & Elenor Roy, and was a farmer living in Malahide when he was married on February 28, 1889 in Aylmer to Lottie Guyette (1865-1939), of St. Thomas.  Lottie was born in the United States, daughter of Louis & Adeline Guyette. William was living at 77 Askin Street, London when Carman died in 1923.  He is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London.

William & Lottie were living in St. Thomas on the 1901 census, and by 1911 had moved to London.  

Carman Roy was a carpenter living with his parents at 124 Colborne Street, London when he enlisted for service following the Armistice, on March 13, 1919.  He gave his date of birth as February 22, 1899.

Carman was working as a farm labourer in North Dorchester Township when he accidentally drowned on September 2, 1923, in his 20th year.  He was living at lot 6, concession 6.

He is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 4, 1923:

LONDON, ONT. YOUTH IS VICTIM OF DROWNING

Cecil Roy Was Riding Horse Across Lake When Thrown and Trampled On

Springfield, Sept. 3 – Cecil Roy, 19, of 95 Askin Street, London, was drowned shortly after noon Sunday in Whittaker’s Lake, about six miles north of here.

The victim with companions had driven from the farm where he had been employed for about a year to the lake with horse and buggy. He decided to wash the buggy and drove out into the lake for that purpose. Later he decided to leave the buggy there to set the rubber tires in the water. He unhitched the horse and getting on its back started across the lake. The horse became tangled in the weeks with which the lake abounds, and in its struggles threw Roy off and trampled him.  Before his companions were able to get assistance he was drowned.

The body was recovered an hour and a half later, was badly bruised where it had been trampled by the horse.  Dr. Doan, of Harrietsville, decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

Served in War

The accident victim was a son of Mr and Mrs Carman Roy, 95 Askin street, and would have been 20 years of age in October. He had been working for John Eden, a farmer, north of Springfield, for about a year. He is survived by his parents, six sisters, Mrs. Glen Udell, Niagara Falls; Mrs. Lila Stuart, Los Angeles, Cal.; Mrs. Roy Jenkins and Mrs. Arthur Holand, city, and two brothers, Howard, of Brandon, Man., and Erwin, of Windsor. Despite his youth, the deceased served for a short time in the army during the Great War.

Gordon Rozell

529339  Gordon Rozell and wife

Gordon Rozell was born on April 22, 1899 at Atwood in Elma Township, Perth County, the son of Sidney Rozell & Clara Dunn.  The family moved to Malahide township where they were living in the Copenhagen area on the 1911 census.

Gordon was a farmer and for some reason enlisted under the alias of Clayton William West.  He gives his address as the Standard Hotel, Walkerville, Ontario.  His next of kin is his mother, Clara Rozell of R.R. #2 Aylmer. He enlisted on June 18, 1917 in Windsor.

Gordon was married on April 3, 1918 at Copenhagen to Leola Susanna Kelley (1901-1924), daughter of Thomas Kelley & Isola Minard of the Copenhagen area. The marriage registration gives Gordon’s residence as St. Thomas and his occupation as soldier. The article about their marriage in the Aylmer Express, April 11, 1918 states that Pte. Gordon Rozelle, of the C.A.M.C. and his wife will reside in St. Thomas until he leaves for overseas.

Gordon arrived home from overseas on May 6, 1919, landing in Vancouver after sailing from Hong Kong.

Gordon & Leola had a son Maxwell, born in 1919 at Copenhagen, and another son in 1921 who lived only a few hours.  Leola died on March 21, 1901 at lot 15, concession 2 Malahide and is buried in Dunboyne cemetery.

Gordon was working as a painter and living at 380 Hamilton Road in London when he was remarried on February 18, 1925 in Toronto to Alice Ruth Ann Phillips, of Toronto, the daughter of George Phillips & Melissa Rozell. Gordon is believed to have moved later to the Wasaga Beach area, but no further information is known.

William Ruddy

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William Ruddy was born on January 4, 1895 in County Kildare, Ireland. He emigrated to Canada with Dr. Barnardo’s party as a “Home Child”, leaving Liverpool on February 21, 1907 on the ship Dominion, and arriving in Portland on March 5, 1907.  He went first to the Toronto area where he is found on the 1911 census as a labourer living with John A. & Ida Porter, farmers, in Scarborough. 

William moved to Springfield where he was farming there when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on December 29, 1915 in St. Thomas. He states that all his relatives are deceased, and he names his next of kin as a friend, Roland Newell, of Springfield.

William returned from overseas on April 9, 1918, arriving in Halifax. An article in the Aylmer Express, April 18, 1918 reports his return:

SPRINGFIELD HEROES RETURN HOME

Pte. William Ruddy of this place returned home Friday night on M.C.R. train No. 10. The returned hero, who has been wounded while fighting in France was met at the station by a large crowd and a procession of autos and was escorted to the home of Tyler Leeson, for whom he worked prior to enlisting. Pte. Ruddy has been a resident of Springfield for seven years. He was wounded in the leg at Passchendaele.

 Following the war, William moved to Hanna, Alberta where he was living when he was married on September 2, 1921 to Florence Mabel Newell (born 1896).  Florence was born in Malahide, the daughter of Thomas Newell & Jane Rockey, and was a sister of the above Roland Newell.  

Florence was on the teaching staff at the Edgerton School for three years prior to her marriage.

William & Florence continued to live in Hanna, Alberta, where they had at least two children, Janet & Jack.  In 1955, Florence was living in Edmonton.

 

Gerald Cole Rundle

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The name Gerald Rundle is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916. 

Gerald was born on August 19, 1895 at Sparta, the son of John Rundle (1860-1924) & Anna Cole (1871-1962).  John was born in Sparta, the son of John Rundle & Jane Philp, and was farming at Sparta when he was married there on June 14, 1893 to Anna Cole, also a native of Sparta, the daughter of William & Almira Cole.  They are buried in Friends Cemetery, Sparta.

Gerald was farming in Sparta when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1916 in Guelph.  He had served 1 ½ years in the 30th Battery.  He returned home to Sparta from the war in 1919, arriving in Halifax on July 24. He had served with the 43rd Battery.

Gerald was married to Nora Leoni (died February 9, 1969). He died on April 4, 1979 and is buried with his wife in Friends Cemetery, Sparta.

 

William Rutter

189570  William Rutter

The name “William Rutter” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Kingsmill.

William Rutter was born on May 31, 1891 at Birkenhead, Cheshire, England, the son of Samuel Rutter & Lucy Harris.  He emigrated to Canada as a “home child” at the age of 16, leaving Liverpool on March 12, 1908 with Dr. Stephenson’s party, on the ship Dominion, arriving in Halifax on march 21, 1908.

William is found on the 1911 census in Yarmouth, a labourer living with Joseph & Violet Grandy.  He enlisted for service on December 6, 1915 in St. Thomas with the 91st Battalion.  His address is given as “P.O. Kingsmill”, and he names his next of kin as his father, Samuel Rutter, of Birkenhead, Cheshire.  He served in France in the 1st Battalion and was in the battle of the Somme.  He was discharged in April 1919.

William returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 21.  He was living in London employed as a tinsmith when he was married on June 18, 1919 in London to Emily Hill (1893-1972), a native of England living in London, Ont., the daughter of Henry Hill & Emma Pope.

William died on January 13, 1985 at the age of 93. He and his wife Emily are buried in Forest Lawn cemetery, London.

Martin James Ryan

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The name “John M. Ryan” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Port Burwell.

No one by that name can be found on the 1901 or 1911 census in Bayham, but an attestation paper was found for a Martin James Ryan.

According to his attestation paper, Martin Ryan was born on July 8, 1885 in Muskoka, and was living in Port Burwell when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas on December 14, 1915.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Myrtle Ryan, of Port Burwell. He had two children.

Martin & Myrtle are found on the 1911 census in Bayham, living with her parents, William & Ada Smith (Smythe), and one son Murray (born ca 1910).

Martin returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in New York, New York on February 8.

Martin died on April 29, 1943 at Port Burwell in his 58th year.  He is buried in St. Luke’s cemetery with his wife Ada Myrtle (1884-1966).

 His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 6, 1943 in the Port Burwell News column:

The death of Martin J. Ryan, beloved husband of Mrs. Ada Myrtle Smythe Ryan, occurred Thursday last around 11 a.m., following a heart attack at the fish house, in his 58th year. Born in England, he came here around 30 years ago.  Mr. Ryan is survived by his wife and four children: Mrs. Philip Bucheski Ione, and Wilfred at home; and Murray of Windsor, and one grandson.  Mr. Ryan served in the 91st Battalion in the First Great War under Col. W. J. Green, and went to France with the 3rd Battalion. The remains were at rest at his late residence, Erieus Street here until Sunday when the body was removed to the H. A. Ostrander funeral home, on Main Street, where the funeral was held Sunday at 2 p.m. It was the largest funeral in Port Burwell for some years. There were around 40 Legion members present from Aylmer, Vienna and Port Burwell, who assisted. Mr. Ryan was buried with military honors, with A. J. Bodsworth, a war veteran, sounding the “Last Post”.

Rev. E. A. Poulter, pastor of the local United Church, was in charge, and delivered a very comforting message to a large number of relatives and friends. He was assisted by the Rev. E. Butcher, pastor of the local Baptist Church, who took as his text, Isaiah 6:1 “When I Saw the Lord.”.  Mrs. Sheppard, of Tillsonburg, sang “In the Year Uggial Died When I Saw the Lord”.

It was the largest funeral witnessed by the residents here for some years. Relatives and friends were present from Tillsonburg, Vienna, Windsor, Aylmer, Port Burwell, Corinth and the surrounding country. Floral tributes were beautiful and numerous, completely covering the casket, from relatives and friends of the deceased fisherman. Mr. Ryan was manager of the Kolbe Fish Company here for several years. The bearers were Captains of the Kolbe fish tugs as follows: Karl Kolbe, Charles Philon, Dan MacDonald, Murray Giffen, John Matthews and George Gilbert.  

Burial took place in the family plot in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Donald Ryckman

Donald Marr Ryckman was born on April 19, 1898 in Aylmer, the son of Harley Ryckman (1872-1953) & Margaret Marr (1868-1940).  Harley was born in Elgin County, the son of Lester Ryckman & Sarah Young, and was a clerk living in Aylmer when he was married on May 12, 1897 to Margaret Marr, also of Aylmer, the daughter of Asa Marr & Sarah Campbell.  The family is found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Aylmer.  Harley & Margaret are buried in Aylmer cemetery.

No attestation paper can be found for Donald, in Canadian or US records, but his name is found on a memorial unveiled at Aylmer High School. When his mother died in 1940, Donald was living in Three Rivers, Michigan.  According to US census records, he emigrated to the United States in 1916. He is found on the 1920 census in Grand Rapids, Michigan, unmarried, a labourer on the railroad.  On the 1930 census, he is still unmarried, living in Three Rivers, St. Joseph County, a box maker in a box shop.

The Aylmer Express of April 3, 1919 reports that “Pte. Donald Ryckman, son of Mr and Mrs Harley Ryckman, of Odessa, Ont., is visiting his aunt, Miss H. Marr. Donald has just returned from France, where he served several months with the 66th U.S. artillery.”

Donald was married to Barbara Rouse.  He died on March 25, 1965 in Three Rivers, Michigan.