We Will Remember Them – Surnames S – Z

We Will Remember Them
The Men & Women of East Elgin
Who Served
in the First Great War
1914 – 1918

Surnames S to Z

INTRODUCTION

compiled by James L. McCallum
© Ontario Genealogical Society, Elgin County Branch
October 2010
Published by Ontario Genealogical Society, Elgin County Branch,
All rights reserved.  No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, or by any means – electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microform reproduction, recording, or otherwise – without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Carl Lindsay Saunders

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Carl Lindsay Saunders was born on May 27, 1898 in Malahide, the son of Frederick Lee Saunders (1874-1933) & Vesta Evelyn Lindsay (1877-1956).  Frederick was born in Malahide, the son of Joseph Saunders & Cynthia Adelaide Westover, and was married in Malahide on December 19, 1894 to Vesta Lindsay, also of Malahide, the daughter of Robert Henry Lindsay & Edith Amanda McKenney.  Fred & Vesta lived in the Copenhagen area before moving to Carberry, Manitoba about 1905 where they are found on the 1911 census.  They later returned to Ontario, living in Brantford, St. Thomas and finally Malahide. They are buried in Dunboyne cemetery.
Carl Saunders was a commercial student living at Carberry, Manitoba when he enlisted for service on March 11, 1916 at Winnipeg.  He belonged to the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers.
Following the war, Carl returned to the Aylmer area, where he lived until the 1930s.  He  was married to Leone Bras (1897-1977).  They moved to Kirkland Lake where they were living at 18 Queen Street, when he died on March 9, 1972. He is buried with his wife in Dunboyne cemetery.
His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, March 11, 1972:
CARL SAUNDERS
Kirkland Lake – Carl Saunders of Kirkland Lake, Ontario, and formerly of Aylmer and Malahide Township, died suddenly on Thursday in his 74th year.  Born in Malahide Township, the son of the late Mr and Mrs Fred Saunders, he had served in the armed forces during the First World War, and was a member of the Kirkland Lake Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion, and resided in Aylmer some 40 years ago.
Surviving are his wife, the former Leona Prass [sic]; sons, Ted of Kirkland Lake, Roger of London, and Robert of Cochrane; a sister, Mrs. W. H. (Jean) Hodkinson of RR 1 Sparta, and six grandchildren.
Resting at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer, from noon Monday, for service at 3 p.m. Monday, with Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church, Aylmer, officiating. Interment in Dunboyne Cemetery.

Harold Leslie Sawyer

189605  Harold Sawyer
Harold Sawyer was born on December 10, 1895 at Lyons in South Dorchester, the son of George Sawyer (1857-1939) & Annie Blake (1866-1899).  George was born in England, the son of John S. & Alice Sawyer, and was a tailor living in Tillsonburg when he was married in South Dorchester on March 1, 1893 to Annie Blake, of South Dorchester, daughter of John & Serinda Blake.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Harold was a cheesemaker living at 33 Mary Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted with the 91st Battalion on December 9, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He had served two years in the 39th Battery in Aylmer.  He sailed for England on June 29, 1916, and was appointed Corporal on July 5, 1916.  He was transferred to the 36th Battalion on July 15, 1916 and to the 38th Battalion on August 21, 1916.  He went to France on August 21, 1916 and was appointed Lance Sergeant on April 10, 1917.  He received a shell wound to his right leg and left hip on June 19, 1917 and was invalided to England.  He returned to Canada and honorably discharged January 10, 1918. He was awarded the Military Medal, the British War Medal, and the Victory Medal.
A photo of Harold with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Corp. H. L. Sawyer, son of Mr and Mrs Geo. Sawyer, Lyons, was born in that place 21 years ago. He heeded the call and enlisted with the 91st Batt. He has been in France for several months and has so far enjoyed good health.”
A letter from Harold was printed in the Aylmer Express, December 28, 1916:
MORE GLORIOUS SIGHT COULD NOT BE SEEN
Pte. Harold Sawyer of 91st Batt., Writes His Father, Geo. Sawyer, Lyons,
About Big Fight on Nov. 18
Somewhere in France, Nov. 21
Dear Father –
I have not had time till now to write to you.  I sent a field card to you yesterday, maybe you will get it the same time you get this.  Well, Dad, I have had a great experience that I will never forget.  There were men dropping down all around me, wounded and killed and I came through without a scratch.  I thank God for that, as only He could bring me out of it. At the starting of it, it was the happiest moment of my life, and a more glorious sight could never be seen. You could not hear your chum three feet away speaking to you.  My mate that I was working with was killed right next to me, and I tell you we certainly had a time.
We certainly had our hands full bandaging up the wounded. You know that fellow that owns that watch I sent home. I dare not mention names. He was wounded and his brother killed.  I tell you, Dad, I do feel sorry about these boys.  There are a lot of the 91st lads that will never return.  It seems awful today to hear the mail called out, as some of those that had mail, were left on no man’s land never to return. After it was all over, I cried about it. You can call me what you like.  I was not a bit frightened when the advance was on, I did not have time to think about it.
Now, Dad, do not worry about me as I am safe and sound. God is looking after me, and if I am to come back He will bring me back.  This pencil that I am writing with was taken out of a German dugout on the morning of the 18th of November and is a pretty good one. I found some pictures on “no man’s land”. I suppose they belong to some poor fellows, so I am going to send them to you, and if you can find anyone that will claim them, give them to them, but if not, keep them. Remember me to mother and Jack.  I remain, as ever, your loving son, Harold.
A photograph and story about Harold appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 12, 1917:
STRETCHER-BEARER HAROLD SAWYER
Son of Mr. George Sawyer, of Lyons, who enlisted with the 91st Battalion. His father received a telegram from Ottawa last week stating that he had been severely wounded in the thigh.  A few weeks ago Stretcher-Bearer Sawyer was mentioned in the dispatches, and received the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous bravery under fire.  He has had many hair-breadth escapes while attending to his duties of rescuing his comrades and carrying them to the dressing stations, but this is the first time he has been wounded.
A letter to Harold’s father regarding his injuries was printed in the Aylmer Express, July 26, 1917:
HAROLD SAWYER HAS SPLENDID RECORD
Was Wounded in both Thighs. Cpt. W. T. Bull writes Mr. Geo. Sawyer Particulars
of his Son’s Injuries
20-6-17
Mr. Geo. Sawyer:
Dear Sir –
No doubt by the time you receive this letter you will have heard of your son, Harold. But still it was his wish while getting his wounds dressed that I should write to you and explain.  I am certainly pleased to hear that he is not seriously wounded. It was on the evening of the 19th of June about 8 p.m. when your son Cpl. H. L. Sawyer was walking down the trench, a shell burst in rear and to the left of him, and two fragment hit him. One piece in the right leg a few inches below the knee in rear, and the other piece struck him in the left hip. I might say your boy is well thought of in this battalion and he has a splendid record, and many friends. His words when he got hit were, “Oh, well, the Lord is good”.  His many friends join me in wishing him a speedy recovery, and when he gets better let’s hope the war shall be at an end so that he will not have to come back here again.
Yours sincerely, Corporal W. T. Bull
An article in the St. Thomas Daily Times, June 15, 1917, tells of a medal he was awarded:
HAROLD SAWYER TO RECEIVE D.C. MEDAL
Lyons Soldier, Who Went Overseas With 91st, Wins Honors
Aylmer, June 15 – Harold Sawyer, of Lyons, has been made a corporal and recommended for a distinguished conduct medal for his bravery when acting as a stretcher-bearer at Vimy Ridge. He went over with the 91st as corporal, but discarded his stripes that he might sooner get to the firing line.
The following citation for his receiving the Military Medal, dated July 9, 1917, reads as follows:
“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the operations on Vimy Ridge from 9th to 13th April 1917. This man was a stretcher bearer and showed exceptional bravery in attending to the wounded under heavy fire during the attack on 9th April. He attended to the wounded in No Man’s Land from the commencement of the assault with entire disregard of his own safety repeatedly passing through the enemy’s Counter artillery barrage. On several occasions too, he went out in full view of the enemy and in spite of machine gun fire directed at him, continued his duties. He showed a splendid spirit and is thoroughly deserving of an immediate reward. He was previously recommended for excellent work rescuing some men who were gassed in a dug-out blown in by the explosion by the enemy of a camouflet, but received no award.”
Sgt. J. H. L. Sawyer returned from overseas on November 30, 1917, arriving in Halifax. His return was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 20, 1917, with a photograph and the following caption:
“Stretcher Bearer Harold Sawyer, son of George Sawyer, of Lyons, who enlisted and went overseas with the 91st Battalion. After many months service as stretcher bearer in France, he was wounded, and was sent to England to recover. The work of stretcher bearer is one of the most hazardous of duties and Pte. Sawyer has been under German fire scores of times. Dozens of times his comrades have been killed by his side, and it seemed his life was charmed. He was given a welcome home at Springfield last week.”
Harold was employed as a cheesemaker at Lyons when he was married on December 25, 1918 in Aylmer to Verlie May Matthews (1898-1968), of Aylmer, the daughter of Edgerton Clay Matthews & Lottie Burkholder.  Their marriage announcement in the Aylmer Express, states that “the marriage took place under a white arch trimmed with holly, the background being a large Union Jack, in honor of the groom who returned just one year ago from France”.
Harold lived most of his life in Aylmer, but was living at 202 Highview Drive, St. Thomas when he died on April 18, 1979 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery. His first wife, Verlie, died in 1968.  His second wife was Vera Prier Carrothers.
Harold’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 25, 1979:
HAROLD L. SAWYER
Harold Leslie Sawyer, formerly of Highview Drive, St. Thomas, died on Wednesday, April 18 at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. He was 84 years old.  Mr. Sawyer was born in South Dorchester Township on December 10, 1895.  He resided in Aylmer most of his life where he was a garage operator, a member of the Aylmer Baptist church and a member of the Aylmer Lodge 94 I.O.O.F, and the Colonel Talbot Royal Canadian Legion. He was a member of the 91st Battalion during World War I.  He had been presented with the military medal.
Mr. Sawyer was the son of the late George and Annie (Blake) Sawyer.  He was predeceased by his first wife, the former Verlie Matthews in 1968. Surviving are his wife, the former Vera Carrothers; sons, George and Jack, both of Aylmer, and stepchildren Blake and Graydon Carrothers of Aylmer and Mrs. Jack (Wilma) Gilbert of Sarnia.  As well, a number of grandchildren and three great-grandchildren are surviving.
The funeral was held Saturday April 21 from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home with Rev. Gordon Woodcock of Aylmer Baptist church officiating, assisted by Rev. Sam Findlay.  Pall bearers were Bill Chinnery, Jim Durdle, Ken Earhart, John Magee, Ray Roloson and Doug Smith. The flowers were carried by Ron Sawyer and Richard Sawyer.  Members of the Aylmer Lodge I.O.O.F. held a memorial service on Friday night, April 20. Burial was made in the Aylmer Cemetery.

Clarence William Saxton

3139057
Clarence William Saxton was born on September 5, 1894 at Lakeview in Malahide, the son of John Alexander Saxton (1847-1927) & Henrietta McConnell (1865-1951).  Both were natives and residents of Malahide when they were married on May 20, 1891 in Malahide.  John was the son of Elijah & Margaret Saxton.  Henrietta was the daughter of G. Milton & Phoebe McConnell.
Clarence enlisted for service on June 18, 1918.  He was a farmer and gave his address as Port Burwell. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on August 23.
He was a farmer living in Malahide when he was married on September 17, 1925 in Corunna, Ontario, to Margaret Helen Miller (1895-1985), a native of Lambton County living in Malahide, daughter of Andrew Miller & Annie Grant.
He died on January 30, 1958 and is buried with his parents in Aylmer Cemetery. His obituary, from an undated clipping, follows:
CLARENCE W. SAXTON DIES AT LAKEVIEW
Clarence W. Saxton died last night at his home at Lakeview on the farm where he was born 63 years ago. He had been ill for the past few months.  He was the son of the late Henrietta McConnell and John Alexander Saxton. Mr. Saxton was a member of the Lakeview Baptist church and of the Board of Trustees and was also a member of Oriental Lodge No. 181, A.F. and A.M., Port Burwell. He was educated at the Port Burwell Continuation School, the Baptist College, Woodstock, and OAC, Guelph. He served for a number of years as a trustee of the local school section and during World War I served overseas with the Canadian Army.
He is survived by his widow, the former Margaret Helen Miller; one daughter, Mrs. R. W. Margaret Read, of Galt; a grandson, David John Read, and a sister, Mrs. Frank (Margaret) Procunier, Straffordville.
Resting at the James H. Barnum Funeral Home here, where the funeral service will be held on Monday afternoon at two o’clock. Rev. D. K. Dolby, of the Lakeview Baptist Church, will officiate. Interment will be in Aylmer Cemetery.

Clarence Alvin Scanlan

3132561
Clarence Scanlan was born on September 25, 1897 in Port Burwell, the son of George H. Scanlan (1869-1948) & Myrtle Ivy Chivers (1871-1955). George was the son of James Scanlan & Rachel Lebar.  George & Myrtle are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Clarence was living in Port Stanley employed as a dredgeman when he enlisted for service on April 2, 1918 in London.
He died in 1976 and is buried with this wife M. Pearl (1897-1987) in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Percival Harold Scanlan

189559
Percy Scanlan was born on April 12, 1900 in Bayham, the son of Walter Virgil Scanlan (1879-1965) & Annie Maud Soper (1882-1958).  Virgil Scanlan was born in Port Burwell, the son of William & Matilda Scanlan, and was a farmer living at Griffin’s Corners when he was married on June 7, 1899 in Port Burwell to Anna Soper, a native of Vienna, the daughter of Levi Leonard Soper & Mary Ann Bartlett.  They are buried in Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery, Leamington.
Percy was a bookkeeper living in Chatham when he enlisted under age on December 6, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He gives his date of birth as April 12, 1896, but a notation added later changed it to 1900.  He lists his next of kin as his father, Virgil, of the 2nd Concession of Chatham Township.
Percy returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on April 15.  He died in 1956 and is buried in Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery, Leamington.

Theron Arthur Scanlan

3138121
Theron Scanlan was born on July 19, 1897 in Port Burwell, the son of Arthur W. Scanlan & Ida May Williams.  Arthur was born in Bayham, the son of James Scanlan & Rachel Lebar, and was farming there when he was married on October 14, 1884 in Houghton to Ida Williams, of Houghton, daughter of Francis & Clarissa Williams.
Theron was living in Port Burwell, employed as a dredger when he enlisted for service on June 11, 1918 in London.
No further information is known.

John Schram

4000072
John Schram was born on March 16, 1895 in Aylmer, the son of James Frederick Schram (born 1871 in Beverly Twsp., Wentworth Co.) & Betsy Elizabeth Scott (born 1863 in South Norwich Twsp., Oxford Co.) James & Betsy were married on April 6, 1887 in Tillsonburg.  The family is found on the 1901 Malahide census, but by 1911 they had moved to South Dorchester.
John was a teamster living in Otterville when he enlisted for service on December 3, 1917 in London.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Betsy, of 6 Eagle Street, St. Thomas.
He was a machinist living in Cayuga when he was married on October 7, 1921 in Dunnville to Lilly Loretta Brooks, daughter of Samuel Brooks & Edith Lewis.
No further information can be found.
 

Charles Augustus Scott

190325
Charles Scott was born on July 19, 1893 at Otterville in South Norwich Township, Oxford County, the son of William Scott (1855-1941) & Margaret Isabel Gark (1858-1951).  William was born in Norwich, the son of Jacob & Hannah Scott, and was living in South Norwich when he was married on July 23, 1887 in Tillsonburg to Margaret Gark, of Dereham Township. She was born in Ingersoll, the daughter of Marshall & Ellen Gark.  William & Margaret lived in Blenheim, Kent County after their marriage, before moving to Otterville in the 1890’s.  In the 1901 census they are living in Aylmer, and in South Dorchester on the 1911 census.  By 1916 they were living at R. R. #1 Mount Salem, in Malahide. William & Margaret later moved to the Dutton area, and are buried in Fairview cemetery there.
Charles Scott was a farmer living at R. R. #1 Mount Salem with his parents when he enlisted for service on May 8, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He gives his date of birth as June 9, 1892.
Charles Scott died on April 25, 1959 and is buried beside his parents in Fairview Cemetery, Dutton.  His obituary appeared in the Dutton Advance, April 29, 1959:
CHARLES SCOTT WAS FORMER DUTTONITE
Charles Scott, a former resident of Dutton, died in hospital at St. Thomas on Saturday morning after an illness of many years.  Mr. Scott was born in Aylmer, a son of the late William Scott and Margaret Gark.  As a young man he worked for the Pere Marquette Railway and he was a veteran of the 91st Battalion in World War I.  His wife, the former Elizabeth Barrett, predeceased him several years ago.
Surviving are one son, William, of Simcoe; two sisters, Mrs. Stanley (Mary) Collins, St. Thomas; and Mrs. Peter (Esther) McGuiniss, of Dutton; and two brothers, Sam and Mark Scott, both of Dutton.
The funeral was held on Monday, Rev. C. E. Beacom conducting the service at the Cyril J. Beill Funeral Home. Interment followed in Fairview Cemetery. The pallbearers were Bert Hind, Vernon Hales, Wm. Whittington, Donald Crawford, Asa Webster and Alex. Buchanan. Friends and relatives attended from St. Thomas, Aylmer and Brantford.

Douglas Edmund Scott

2327418
Douglas Scott was born on March 9, 1899 in Aylmer, the son of Rev. Charles Taggard Scott & Mamie May White.  Rev. Scott was the minister of the Aylmer Methodist church at the time.  They moved to Belleville where Douglas was living when he enlisted for service on June 1, 1917 in Cobourg. He was a student, and named his next of kin as his father, Rev. C. T. Scott, of 100 Bridge Street East, Belleville.
Dr. Douglas Scott was married in 1931 to Gertrude Booker, daughter of C. E. Callaghan.
No further information is known.

Jacob Scott

3140021
Jacob Scott was born on January 24, 1898 in Aylmer, the son of William Scott (1855-1941) & Margaret Isabel Gark (1858-1951).  William was born in Norwich, the son of Jacob & Hannah Scott, and was living in South Norwich when he was married on July 23, 1887 in Tillsonburg to Margaret Gark, of Dereham Township. She was born in Ingersoll, the daughter of Marshall & Ellen Gark.  William & Margaret lived in Blenheim, Kent County after their marriage, before moving to Otterville in the 1890’s.  In the 1901 census they are living in Aylmer, and in South Dorchester on the 1911 census.  By 1916 they were living at R. R. #1 Mount Salem, in Malahide. William & Margaret later moved to the Dutton area, and are buried in Fairview cemetery there.
Jacob was a teamster living with his parents at 15 Penwarden Street, St. Thomas, when he enlisted for service on June 22, 1918 in London.
Jacob was not married, and died on September 22, 1933 at the Memorial Hospital in St. Thomas from pneumonia at the age of 36.  He was living in Dutton at the time of his death.  He is buried beside his parents in Fairview Cemetery, Dutton.  A military marker bears the following inscription:
W.O.R. & 4th B’n C.E.F.  Pte. Jacob Scott 1896 – 1933
His obituary appeared in the Dutton Advance, September 28, 1933:
JACOB SCOTT
Following a short illness of pneumonia, Jacob Scott, son of Mr and Mrs William Scott, Dutton, passed away at Memorial Hospital, St. Thomas, on Friday afternoon. Deceased was in his 37th year and was born at Aylmer, but had resided in Dutton for eight years. One of three brothers who enlisted in the Great War, he was invalided in England and did not cross over to France.  Besides his parents, he leaves three brothers, Samuel, Marshall and Charles, Dutton; and four sisters, Hannah Scott, St. Thomas; Mrs. Scriver, Windsor; and Mrs. Wm. Haines and Esther Scott, Dutton.  Funeral service was held on Monday afternoon at his late home, the service being conducted by Rev. Dr. Macdonald, who was a padre overseas, assisted by Rev. J. M. Dickson and Rev. Mr. Grey, Rodney, the latter a veteran of the war. Interment was made in Fairview, Rev. (Comrade) Grey sounding “The Last Post” and “The Reveille”. The bearers were Comrades Grey, Rodney, Fred Edwards and Wm. Britton, West Lorne; Wm. Haines, Dutton, and Messrs. D. A Duncanson and A. L. Holland.

Sam  Scott

3140023
Sam Scott was born on March 4, 1893 in Aylmer, the son of William Scott (1855-1941) & Margaret Isabel Gark (1858-1951).  William was born in Norwich, the son of Jacob & Hannah Scott, and was living in South Norwich when he was married on July 23, 1887 in Tillsonburg to Margaret Gark, of Dereham Township. She was born in Ingersoll, the daughter of Marshall & Ellen Gark.  William & Margaret lived in Blenheim, Kent County after their marriage, before moving to Otterville in the 1890’s.  In the 1901 census they are living in Aylmer, and in South Dorchester on the 1911 census.  By 1916 they were living at R. R. #1 Mount Salem, in Malahide. William & Margaret later moved to the Dutton area, and are buried in Fairview cemetery there.
Sam was a teamster living at 15 Penwarden Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on June 22, 1918 in London.
He died on January 20, 1978 and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Dutton. His obituary appeared in the Dutton Advance, January 25, 1978:
SAM SCOTT PASSES, WAS FORMER DUTTON EMPLOYEE
The passing occurred at the Bobier Convalescent Home on Friday, January 20th, of Sam J. Scott. Born in Aylmer, the son of the late William Scott and the late former Margaret Gark, he lived in Dutton most of his life. For many years he was a faithful member of Dutton maintenance department.  Mr. Scott was a veteran of the First World War and served overseas in the Canadian Occupational Army following the war.  He lived at the convalescent home for the past five years.
Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Stanley (Mary) Collins, of St. Thomas; and Mrs. Peter (Esther) McGinnis, of R.R. 2 Springfield; one brother, Mark Scott, of Dutton, three nieces and one nephew. The service at the Cyril J. Beill Funeral Home on Sunday afternoon was conducted by Rev. David Northey of St. John’s United Church. A solo, the 23rd Psalm, was sung by Mrs. James Bennett.  Miss Annie March was organist.  Interment in Fairview cemetery. Friends and relatives attended from St. Thomas, Springfield, West Lorne and the surrounding area.

William Scott

3140022
William Scott was born on May 2, 1895 in Springfield, the son of Samuel Scott & Bertha Bradt.  Samuel was born in South Norwich Township, the son of Jacob & Hannah Scott, and was a labourer living in Otterville when he was married there on August 25, 1893 to Bertha Bradt, a native of Windham Township, but living in Otterville, the daughter of Isaac & Mary Bradt.  The family is found on the 1911 census in St. Thomas, and they later moved to Middlemarch in Southwold Township.
William was a farmer living with his parents at Middlemarch when he enlisted for service on June 22, 1918 in London. No further information is known.

George Elga Scriver

3132381
George Elga Scriver was born on March 16, 1894 in Aylmer, according to his attestation paper. He is found on the 1901 census in Bayham, and appears to be the son of Elizabeth Scriver, born 1875, the daughter of James & Sarah Scriver.  Elizabeth later married Roy Schrader and moved to Aylmer where they are found on the 1911 census.
George was a shoemaker living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on March 14, 1918 in London.  He names his mother, Elizabeth Schrader of Aylmer as his next of kin.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on June 13. No further information can be found.

John Edward Scriver

189341  John Scriver
J. Edward Scriver was born on March 11, 1873 in Bayham, the son of James Scriver & Sarah Wilson (Willison).  He was a farmer living in Bayham when he was married on March 6, 1902 to Lillian Grace Robbins (ca1885-1924), also of Bayham, daughter of Wesley Robbins & Henrietta May.
He was living in Aylmer employed as a mason when he enlisted for service on November 2, 1915 in Aylmer.  He had served with the 30th Battery C.F.A.  He gave his date of birth as March 11, 1881 on the Attestation paper.
Edward’s wife Lillian died on March 27, 1924 in Port Huron at the age of 39.  Edward died on November 10, 1957 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery in a Westover family plot with a Martha Jane Scriver (1869-1956), his sister.  There is also a military monument near that plot bearing the following inscription:
John E. Scriver Private 1 CIW, Battn. C.E.F. 10 Nov. 1957 Age 84
His obituary from an undated clipping, follows:
J. EDWARD SCRIVER GREAT WAR VETERAN
AYLMER – J. Edward Scriver, a resident of Yarmouth Centre the past year and formerly of Aylmer, died on Sunday in Westminster Hospital, London. He had been ill four years and in hospital for the past month.
Born at Richmond 82 years ago, he was a son of the late James Scriver and Sarah Willison. He had spent his entire life in the Aylmer district with the exception of seven years when he lived in Port Huron.
He had lived with his sister, Mrs. Jane Westover, of Aylmer, until she died a year ago, and since then had resided with his granddaughter at Yarmouth Centre.
Mr. Scriver served overseas during World War I, and was a member of Colonel Talbot Branch 81 of the Canadian Legion. He was employed at R.C.A.F. Station Aylmer as an engineer until his retirement in 1950.
He is survived by three sons, Ray, Port Stanley; Leslie, Aylmer; James, Oscoda, Mich.; one daughter, Mrs. Charles (Helen) Peters, Aylmer; three brothers, Henry, Port Huron; Dan and Frank, both of London. He is also survived by several grandchildren, two great grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.
At rest at the James H. Barnum Funeral Home here where a Canadian Legion service conducted by Legion Padre Rev. T. Dale Jones will take place on Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. Interment will be made in the Aylmer Cemetery.

John (Jack) Harley Scruton

3139609
Jack Scruton was born on November 21, 1896 in Vienna, the son of Robert Scruton (1864-1940) & Mandetta (Montez) Watts (1862-1932). She was the daughter of James C. Watts & Mary Cook.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Jack was a farmer living with his parents at RR #1 Vienna when he enlisted for service on January 1, 1918 in London.
He was married on June 2, 1928 in Windsor to Audrey Elaine Bedford (born 1902).
Jack died in February 1956.
No further information is known.

Huron Stewart Sears

3133082  Huron Sears
Huron Sears was born on January 25, 1894 in Port Burwell, the son of George Sears (1864-1937) & Essie M. Stewart (1864-1946).  George was the son of Harry & Eliza Sears, and was employed as a bartender and hotel keeper in Aylmer when he was married there on December 2, 1890 to Essie Stewart, also of Aylmer, the daughter of William James & Mary Stewart.  They are buried in Aylmer Cemetery.
Huron was living in Aylmer employed as a shoe cutter when he enlisted for service on April 15, 1918 in London.
Following the war he returned to Aylmer where he was married on March 31, 1920 to Beatrice Ethel Bottrill (1890-1981), of Aylmer, a native of Leistershire, England, and daughter of Albert Bottrill & Prudence Clark.
Huron Sears died on September 7, 1964 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 9, 1964:
HURON S. SEARS
Owner and operator of Sears Shoe Store here since 1923, Huron S. Sears, 70, died early Tuesday morning in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital where he was taken early Monday evening following a heart attack.  Mr. Sears was a son of the late Mr and Mrs George Sears. He was born in Port Burwell Jan. 25, 1894, and had lived here almost all his life. The family residence is at 199 Talbot Street West.
A devout member of Trinity Anglican Church, Mr. Sears served over the years as a delegate to the Synod of Huron, as warden of Trinity church, on the board of management, and as vestry clerk. He was a member of Aylmer Lodge No. 94, I.O.O.F., and of Col. Talbot Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion, having served overseas with the Canadian Armed Forces in World War I.
Surviving are his wife, the former Beatrice Bottrill; one brother, William of Aylmer, and two grandchildren, Vickie and Tamara of Woodstock. A son, George, died in 1958. At rest at the Hughson Funeral Home until Thursday when removal will be made to Trinity Anglican Church for service at 2 p.m.  The Rev. Ronald Matthewman will officiate. Interment in Aylmer Cemetery.
 

William George Shaw

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William Shaw was born in 1869 in Greenock, Scotland, the son of William Shaw & Grace Barr.  He emigrated to Canada about 1907 and settled in Ridgetown where he was living at the time of his marriage there on June 7, 1911 to Ethel May Barrett, of Howard Township, Kent County, daughter of Thomas Barrett & Elizabeth Ann Grigg.
William was employed as a mason and living in Ridgetown when he enlisted for service there on December 14, 1915.  He gives his date of birth as September 24, 1873.  He enlisted with the 91st Battalion but was transferred to the 186th Battalion on February 28, 1916.
William moved to Bayham Township,  where he died on November 8, 1943.  He is buried in Aylmer cemetery. The inscription on his marker reads as follows:
“Pte. William G. Shaw 1869-1943,  91st & 186th Batns.  C.E.F.
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, November 11, 1943:
WM. GEORGE SHAW
The death occurred on Monday morning, at his home on the first concession of Bayham, two miles west of Port Burwell, of Wm. George Shaw. Ill only for two weeks, Mr. Shaw was a veteran of World War I, and has two sons overseas serving with the Canadian Army. Born in Scotland 74 years ago, he came to Canada when he was 38 years old, settling near Ridgetown, where he followed his profession of a stonemason. Mr. Shaw had been a resident of Bayham for six years when his death occurred.
A member of the Ridgetown Presbyterian Church, he leaves besides his wife, one daughter, Mrs. George McIvor, Royal Oak, Michigan, and three sons, Spr. William Shaw, with the Royal Canadian Engineers overseas; Signalman Walter Shaw, with the Royal Canadian Signal Corps, also in England; and Robert Shaw of Lakeview.  There are three grandchildren.
The funeral was held from the James H. Barnum Funeral Home, on Wednesday, November 10th at 2:30 in the afternoon. The pallbearers were Lyle McConnell, Percy Matthews, Willis Weaver, Harvey Brown, Henry Balcomb and Lionel Wilson. Rev. Lynden C. Lawson, of St. Paul’s United Church, Aylmer, was in charge of the service. A bugler from No. 14 S.F.T.S., Aylmer, sounded the last post. Mr. Shaw was buried in the Legion plot in the Aylmer cemetery.

Joseph Gordon Shepherd

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Joseph Gordon Shepherd was born on January 27, 1896 at Jaffa in Yarmouth township, the son of James L. Shepherd & Elizabeth V. Porter.  James was born in Bayham, the son of Calvin & Matilda, and was a widower living at Jaffa when he was married on November 28, 1894 at New Sarum to Elizabeth Porter, of Jaffa, the daughter of Joseph & Elmira.  James & Elizabeth farmed in Malahide at Jaffa.
Joseph Gordon Shepherd was a farmer living in Aylmer when he was married on October 24, 1917 in Harrietsville to Mina Cargill, a native of Parry Sound living in Mossley, the daughter of William & Martha Cargill.
Gordon was a farmer living at R. R. #3 St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on June 12, 1918 in London.
Mina died in 1932 at Parry Sound and is buried in Otter Lake Cemetery, Foley Township, Parry Sound District.
Gordon was remarried to Jessie V. Frederick (1907-1967), and died on February 9,  1983.  He and Jessie are buried in West Avenue Cemetery, St. Thomas
Gordon’s obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, February 10, 1983:
GORD SHEPHERD
Joseph Gordon (Gord) Shepherd passed away Wednesday, Feb. 9, 1983, at the Willson Nursing Home, where he was a resident. He was 87. Born January 27, 1896 at Jaffa, the retired paving contractor lived most of his life in the St. Thomas area.
Predeceased by his wife, the former Jessie Viola Fredricks, who died in August 1967, Mr. Shepherd is survived by three sons, Jim, of Fingal; Gerald of RR 1 St. Thomas; and Lloyd of Portage La Prairie, Man.; five daughters, Mrs. Mary Hemsworth of Woodstock, Ont.; Mrs. Ken (Loraine) Johnson of Niagara Falls, Ont.; Mrs. Bill (Joyce) Bell, of London, Ont.; Mrs. Carl (Joan) Aitken, of Southwold, and Mrs. Jim (Jean) Payne, of London; two sisters, Mrs. Tildy Chase, of St. Thomas, and Mrs. Caroline Hill, of Woodstock; 31 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.  Two brothers and eight sisters died previously.
The family is to receive friends from 7 p.m. today at the R. E. Allen Funeral Chapel, 31 Elgin Street. The funeral service is to be held 2 p.m. Saturday in the chapel. Interment at St. Thomas Cemetery.

John Leonard Shook

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John Leonard Shook was born on December 17, 1889 in Springfield, the son of William Henry Shook & Edith Eveline Roberts, who were married in Bayham on February 25, 1884.
He was a bookkeeper living in London when he was married there on August 14, 1913 to Lila Margaret Hoskin, a native of Lambton County living in London, the daughter of Charles William Hoskin & Ida Hellen Edith Borrowman.
He was employed as a mechanic in Detroit when he enlisted for service on April 1, 1916 in Windsor.  His wife was living at 1305 Dundas Street E., London. He joined the 99th Battalion.
Leonard returned from overseas on March 9, 1919, arriving in Halifax. Following the war, he moved to Toledo, Ohio where he died on October 9, 1938. A brief notice of his death appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 20, 1938 in the Springfield news column:
Mr. Harvey Woolley received word some days ago that his cousin, Leonard Shook, of Toledo, died on Sunday, October 9th, and was buried there. Deceased was a son of Mrs. Wm. Shook of Tillsonburg, and the late Wm. Shook.

George Shore

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George Shore was born on November 11, 1876  in Manchester, Lancashire, England, the son of William Shore & Elizabeth Hadwin, who were married in Manchester in 1868. On the 1881 England census, the family is living at 5 Beswick Row, Manchester.
George Shore was a labourer living in Port Bruce when he enlisted with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas on December 16, 1915 at the age of 39.  He was not married, and lists his next of kin as a brother John Shore of New Liskeard, Ontario.
George returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 21. Following the war, George settled at Morpeth in Kent County where he was a fisherman.  While living there he was married on March 24, 1920 in Hilton, Brighton Township, Northumberland County to Fanny Eva Town (1888-1927) a resident and native of Brighton Township, and daughter of Herbert Town & Calista Adelaide Dusenburg.
George died in 1967 and is buried with his wife Fanny in Morpeth Cemetery, Howard Township

Charles Frederick Simpson

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Charles Simpson was born on May 30, 1894 in Duston, Northamptonshire, England, the son of Henry & Elizabeth Simpson. The family is found on the 1901 England census living at 132 Bath Road, Kettering, Northamptonshire.
Charles emigrated to Canada at the age of eleven as a “Home Child” with Dr. Barnardo’s party.  He left Liverpool on September 12, 1907 and arrived at Quebec on September 22, 1907.
Charles was farming at RR #1 Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on January 25, 1916 in Guelph.  He names his next of kin as his brother, Edward Simpson, of Cayuga in Haldimand County.   He joined the 5th Division Ammunition Column, C.D.A.C.
Charles returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on September 14. His address on the passenger list is Cayuga. No further information is known.

Thomas Frederick Simpson

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Thomas Simpson was born on September 7, 1898 in Ridgetown, the son of John J. Simpson & Victoria Tape. John Simpson was born in Ireland, the son of William & Ann Simpson, and was a farmer in Howard Township, Kent County when he was married on September 14, 1897 in London to Victoria Tape, of Orford Township, Kent County, daughter of Lawrence & Ann Tape. John & Victoria are buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Ridgetown.
Thomas was living in Aylmer employed as a clerk when he enlisted for service on May 21, 1917 in London.
Following the war, he returned to Ridgetown and was employed as a bank clerk.  He was married on May 29, 1920 in St. Thomas to Winnifred Hicks of London. No further information is known.
 

Cecil Roy Sims

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Cecil Roy Sims was born on August 5, 1895 at Putnam, in North Dorchester Township, Middlesex County, the son of William Wilson Sims (1855-1927) & Mary Ann Kelso (1880-1952). William was born in Quebec, the son of Andrew Sims & Mary Fox, and was living in North Dorchester Township when he married Mary A. Kelso on February 28, 1887 there.  She also living in North Dorchester, the daughter of James & Mary Kelso.  They farmed in Malahide, and also lived in Ingersoll before returning to Elgin County where William died in 1927 in Port Bruce.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Cecil was a farmer living in Port Bruce when he enlisted for service on September 10, 1918 in London. Cecil died in December 1948.
Cecil’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 16, 1948:
CECIL R. SIMS FOUND DEAD AT PORT BRUCE
Cecil Roy Sims, well known Port Bruce resident, was found dead at his home on Monday evening.  Mr. Sims left his house and had been engaged in jacking up his garage so as to level it, and when he did not return to the house after some time, his house-keeper went out to call him for supper.  The departed man apparently died instantaneously from a heart attack. No inquest will be held.
Mr. Sims was born 55 years ago at Mossley, a son of the late Mr and Mrs William Wilson Sims, and lived at Port Bruce practically all his life with the exception of five years spent at Rondeau. He was unmarried and farmed for many years.  A veteran of World War 1, he served overseas with the Canadian army.  He was a member of the Copenhagen United Church.
Surviving are two brothers, Leo, Sarnia; Frank, London, Ont.; two sisters, Mrs. S. Clyde Hopkins (Lexie), Conroe, Texas; Mrs. W. J. Parker (Olive), Dexter, and a number of nieces and nephews.  The remains are resting at the James H. Barnum funeral home in Aylmer the funeral will be held on Thursday, December 16, with service at 2:30 p.m. and interment in Aylmer cemetery.

Leo Weston Sims

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Leo Weston Sims was born on May 8, 1897 at Copenhagen in Malahide, the son of William Wilson Sims (1855-1927) & Mary Ann Kelso (1880-1952). William was born in Quebec, the son of Andrew Sims & Mary Fox, and was living in North Dorchester Township when he married Mary A. Kelso on February 28, 1887 there.  She also living in North Dorchester, the daughter of James & Mary Kelso.  They farmed in Malahide, and also lived in Ingersoll before returning to Elgin County where William died in 1927 in Port Bruce.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Leo was living in Ingersoll working as a machinist when he enlisted for service on January 7, 1918. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Quebec on June 4.
He was a fisherman living in Port Bruce when he was married on October 6, 1920 in Malahide to Mary Matilda Parker, also of Malahide, the daughter of George Wallace Parker & Asenath K. Aitken.
Leo died on September 3, 1961 and is buried in Aylmer Cemetery.  The inscription on his monument gives his date of birth as May 8, 1898, and his surname is spelled “Simms”.  His wife Mary was born March 22, 1899 and died June 9, 1969.
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 6, 1961:
LEO W. SIMMS
A native of the Aylmer district, Leo Weston Simms of 228 Devine Street, Sarnia, died on Sunday in Victoria Hospital at London. He was 63.  Mr. Simms was born in Copenhagen and went to Sarnia 25 years ago, where he was employed by the Polymer Corporation for 18 years.  Surviving are his widow, the former Mary Parker; two sons, Wray and Bruce, both of Sarnia; one brother Frank, of London; and a sister, Mrs. Lexie Lee of Sinton, Mich.; and two grandchildren. Service was conducted at the Hughson Funeral Home this afternoon by the Rev. H. F. Yardley of St. Paul’s United Church, Sarnia. Interment was in Aylmer Cemetery.

Dr. Charles Wilfred Sinclair

Charles Sinclair
Charles Sinclair was born on January 22, 1888 in Aylmer, the son of Dr. Coll Sinclair (1853-1936) & Lazelle H. Davis (1859-1930).  Coll was the son of Coll & Jane Sinclair and was a physician in Aylmer, a widower, when he married Lazelle Davis on December 12, 1883 in Aylmer. She was also a resident of Aylmer, the daughter of Jehiel M. & Margaret Davis.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Charles W. Sinclair was also a physician living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service with the C.A.M.C. as a Captain on November 12, 1917 in London.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on July 19.
Dr. Charles Sinclair was married on February 24, 1932 to Mary Margaret Brown (1897-1998), daughter of Duncan Brown of Shedden.
Dr. Sinclair died on May 26, 1958 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary, from an undated clipping, follows:
DR. CHARLES W. SINCLAIR DIES; PROMINENT IN PUBLIC LIFE
Aylmer – Dean of the medical profession in Aylmer and a life long resident, Dr. Charles W. Sinclair, 70, died Monday evening in the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital.  He had been in failing health for several months and seriously ill for the past week.
Dr. Sinclair was born in Aylmer on Talbot Street west, in the home established by his father, the late Dr. Coll Sinclair, and mother, the former Lazelle Davis.
Dr. Sinclair was educated in public and high schools here and graduated in 1911 from the University of Toronto Medical School. He served overseas in World War I as a captain in the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He served overseas until 1919 when he returned to rejoin his father in practice.
Dr. Sinclair served some 15 years on the Aylmer High School Board, succeeding his father who had been a member for 36 years. He was chairman of the Board when a new school was built in 1937.
He was an active member of the Aylmer Baptist Church and served for many years as chairman of the finance committee of the church and as a trustee.
He became Elgin County coroner in 1935, succeeding his father in that post. Dr. Sinclair was a member and past master of Malahide Lodge 140 A.F. and A.M., the London Lodge of Perfection, London Rose Croix and Hamilton Consistory. He was a 32nd degree Mason and was treasurer of the Malahide Lodge for a number of years.
Dr. Sinclair enjoyed participation in sport and was one of the first to join the Aylmer Curling Club when it was organized two years ago. He was also a member of the Aylmer Lawen Bowling Club.
He is survived by his wife, the former Margaret Brown; a daughter, Mrs. Charles (Mary) Stickel, of Tillsonburg; two sons, Donald and Duncan, of Aylmer; one brother, Claude, of Winnipeg; and two grandchildren, Charles and Shelley Stickel.
At rest at the residence, 155 Talbot street west, until noon on Thursday when removal will be made to the Aylmer Baptist Church for service at 2:30 p.m. Rev. Fred M. Ward, pastor of the church, will conduct the service. Interment will be made in the family plot in Aylmer Cemetery.  The James H. Barnum Funeral Home, Aylmer, has charge of the arrangements.

Hughston Clarence Sinclair

84245  Hughston Sinclair
Hughston Sinclair was born on February 14, 1888 in South Dorchester, the son of John Sinclair (1851-1910) & Emeretta Hoover (1863-1947). John was born in Middleton Township, Norfolk County, the son of Abraham Sinclair & Mary Spurr, and was a widower living in South Dorchester when he was married on November 10, 1886 in Malahide to Emeretta Hoover, also of South Dorchester, the daughter of Jonas Hoover & Marie Hegler.  John & Emeretta moved to the Copenhagen area, where John died in 1910 at lot 11, concession 2, Malahide. He is buried in Springfield cemetery with his first wife.  Emeretta was remarried to David Britton in 1912 and continued to live at Copenhagen.  She is buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Hughston Sinclair was working as a cheesemaker when he enlisted for service on February 28, 1915 in Guelph.
A letter from Hughston to his mother was printed in the Aylmer Express, July 15, 1915:
SAW BELGIANS WITH THEIR HANDS CUT OFF
The following letter received by Mrs. D. Britton, from her son, Driver H. C. Sinclair, 16th Battery, 4th Brigade, now in Shorncliffe, England, will be found interesting:
Dear Mother – We are having fine weather and it gives one a good opportunity to have a good view of the surrounding country, which is beautiful, far nicer than the towns. The farmer go in for sheep raising right around here.  I had a talk with a man who said that when they had a field of wheat, 60 bushels to the acre was a fair crop and they often get more.  They are haying now.
We have received our horses. They are dandies and in good shape considering their long trip from the Argentine Republic.  I was in a small village where there is an old castle and church built by the Romans, and was all through the latter. The castle is a beautiful old stone structure belonging to a nephew of Premier Asquith.  I peered in one of the windows and gee, the rich carpets, curtains and beautiful paintings were certainly swell. It would like to own it myself if it were in Canada.
Canterbury is about 11 miles north of here and I’m going up there some Sunday. There is an old cathedral there that was also built by the Romans.  Just think of a building nearly 2,000 years ago.  It makes a fellow stick out his eyes.
We are camped in comfortable huts, each holding 20 men, right beside the railroad on the main line between London and France. This morning there was a train load of German prisoners went through on the way to London.
I am glad I joined the army. I was down to Folkestone the other night and there saw a lot of Belgian refugees. I saw one woman who had a hand cut off and her little four-year-old girl also had her hands cut off by the Germans.  You people in Canada read about this in the paper and never think anything of it, but if you saw these things yourself you would feel different. I know I did.
It is certainly a job to get along with their money.  I don’t know it any too good myself. Another thing, when you walk down the street, you turn to the left.  I ran right into a fellow once by not doing so, and after that I always remembered it. They have many ways here that seem queer to us and we have many a laugh over them.
Well I guess I will now close. Will try and tell you some more next time I write. I have written an awful lot of letters since I came here, but am getting caught up now. Write soon to your loving son, Hughston.
Another letter from Hughston was printed in the Aylmer Express, May 11, 1916:
LETTERS FROM THE FRONT
Captured Germans Pitiable Sight, Writes Gunner H. C. Sinclair to His Mother,
Mrs. David Britton
Flanders, March 22, 1916
Dear Mother and All:
Received your welcome letter tonight, and was very glad to hear from you again.  Also received a dandy box from John Pearson and Sandford Woolley and wife, and Mr and Mrs James Corless.  It was just the ticket, and came right through without a stop, I guess. Nothing was broken in it, and everything just fine, even to the cake, which was excellent.  It is good to get a real home-made cake out here.
Well, I am still O.K., and well as usual. The boys say I am getting fat, but my clothes are not any smaller for me. We are having some very fine weather here now, and the farmers are out working on the land. It makes a fellow feel as though spring was here, and maybe it is.  The fine sunny days freshen a fellow up out here. Can’t say I need anything just now. A fellow doesn’t need so very much out here, only clothes and tobacco. Of course, a nice fruit cake like the one Laurene sent over is all right any old time; but then, we are not really suffering for anything.
Say, I am not sure but that the battalion Ike Williams is in is here. He will be a good soldier out here – just the right kind of a chap for the job. Haven’t heard from Clinton Learn yet. Guess he is too busy to write, but Will Bates told me all about how he got wounded, and everything. It is nothing serious but one’s knee is a bad place to get a bullet, for it might make him have a still knee.  Hope it doesn’t result that way. He was a jolly fellow.
We certainly have been going some lately on the firing line, and doing very good work, too. We captured quite a few Germans the other day, and I saw some of them, too. They looked a pitiable sight – clothes all mud and ragged – quite a comparison to us. Some of them looked as though they hadn’t shaved for more than a week; and there was one who looked to be sixty years old or more.  I didn’t see them all, just a few. The 16th Battery had a hand in getting them, of course.
We have had some more rain lately, but tonight it has cleared away, and it is just like a real Canadian spring evening.  Hope we do have good weather now for awhile – think we deserve some. Received a parcel from the Women’s Institute in Aylmer yesterday. Must try and drop them a line thanking them for it. Guess all the Aylmer boys received one.  It was all right, too – contained just what I happened to need. Sorry to hear of Hazel Gillett’s death.
The battalion Ike is in is over here, all right, and I know where it is, but haven’t had time to look him up, but will do so the first chance I get. Am looking for some letters tomorrow on the big Canadian mail. Don’t know of anything more to write about tonight, so I guess I will close this letter. Write soon.
Your every loving son, H. C. Sinclair, 84245, 16th Battery
Two letters from Hughston while still overseas were printed in the Aylmer Express, January 23, 1919:
MALAHIDE SOLDIER IS STOPPING AT FINE HOME IN GERMANY
Is Being Used Well by German People – Huns Have to Salute Allied Soldiers and do it Too
Interesting Facts About the Army of Occupation
The following two letters were recently received by Mrs. David Britton, from her son Howard [sic] C. Sinclair, now in Germany.
Germany, Dec. 8, 1918
Dear Mother –
Just a few lines to you today while I have plenty of time. We have been marching every day lately and a fellow after a long day’s march doesn’t feel much like writing but today we are resting so I am writing a few letters.
Received the parcel OK with the tobacco and cakes in and you bet I was glad to get it too, especially the tobacco. Was almost too generous with my tobacco to the French prisoners coming back, but the poor fellow’s hadn’t had tobacco for two or three years and I just couldn’t help but give everyone a pipeful who asked me for some. The result was I soon ran short and then your parcel came along in the nick of time and it saved my life.
The soap was a thing I needed too for I didn’t have a bit myself, and I don’t like to be borrowing all the time.
I guess some of the prisoners had a hard time of it too, not too much to eat and lots of hard work. I’ll tell you, I felt sorry for some of them. I have shared up my meals with them. But thank goodness, they are nearly all back home now. Well I am in the country I have been looking for, for over three years. My biggest trouble is the language. I could talk French fairly good, and now I have to got to learn German. The people so far use us good. Of course it wouldn’t be wise for them not to. The people here, where I am stopping today are very strong against militarism, but like all the rest the man had to go to war. He was telling me he was at Amiens, Albert and Cambrai against us. He seems glad that old Bill is off the throne, and he is anxious for a government like the Yankees.
As near as I can detect the Germans are more against the English than anyone else. They are really frightened of the Canadians. Maybe that is the reason they treat us so good.
Oh they wait on us on good. This ink I am using is German, also the pen. My own pen is all right, but he gave me this one so I am using it.
We have passed through some very pretty country in our travels. It doesn’t appear to be good for anything else, only to look at. All hills and green trees with some darn nice trout streams. Had trout last night for tea, what do you know about that?
Am going to try and send you picture post cards as we go along, but they are hard to get just now. When we arrive at our destination on the Rhine river, I’ll be able to get lots of them. Bonn is the name of the place. About 88,000 people and one of the largest universities in the world there.
One thing that tickles me here is the German soldiers must salute us, and you bet they do it too.
Don’t know just how long before we will be coming home. I think it will be some time in the spring. Have just heard that the men with the most service will be discharged first. If that is the case I will be among the first. There aren’t very many over here with more service than myself.
Had a letter from Uncle Adam the other day telling me that he is married, also a picture of he and his wife. There’s a monster big mail coming in today, so very likely will get another letter from you on it. Well, I guess I will close for now. Merry Christmas (this time) and a Happy, Happy New Year,
Your ever loving son, H. C. Sinclair
Bonn, Germany, Dec. 14
Dear Mother –
Well we crossed the famous Rhine river yesterday, and I guess it was some big day for us too. What spoiled it was, it rained nearly all day, and I guess nearly everyone got a good soaking, but we went in houses for billets, and the people all soon had good fires burning, so we soon were dry and warm again. We sure have passed through some beautiful country these last few days. I am told that it is the most beautiful scenery along here that there is on the Rhine river and the bridge is a marvel. You see there are very few bridges across the Rhine, they must be big ones to handle the traffic. The way it is finished off struck me, so much ornamental work on it, that one would have to stop and look at it a long time to see everything. I am trying to get a picture of it to send to you, of course a picture will just give you a small idea of what it is like. I am enclosing some cards of a very pretty little place just south of Bonn, we stopped there for a couple of days, and while there I lived in the finest houses along the Rhine river, so the people said it was. Gee, but it was some mansion and furnished so well. Everything in it that one could think of, and a whole lot more. A big millionaire owns it, but the army was using it.
Bonn is a very nice city and it is famous for its colleges and universities, there are quite a number in it. Some famous people went to college there. The late King Edward, also the ex-crown Prince. People come from America here to finish off their education. Have half a mind to see if I can finish mine here, or should I wait until I get back home?
Well the people here still use us fine and are very friendly toward us even to the soldiers who have been demobilized. We meet quite a number that can talk very good English, and so have some great talks on the war. Gee, I guess we had things a bit hard once in awhile, but they sure had a deuce of a time all the time, and to make matters worse for them, I guess their officers were mean, by what they tell us. They can’t understand an officer walking along with one of us, which happens quite often.
Say the mail just now came in, and on it was that box of apples for me. The box had been broken and I think some of the apples missing, by the looks of it, but I’ll tell you, they were fine, tasted just like home, they surely were a great treat. We get a few apples over here, but nothing like those. The apples over here are small, and of course everyone being away to war for four years, the trees haven’t been looked after, and the apples don’t taste like the ones from Canada either, they haven’t got such a mild flavor, but everything that comes from Canada is better.
Well I guess I’ll close now and have an apple, and then go to bed
Your ever loving son, H. C. Sinclair
Following the war, Hughston moved to Detroit where he was employed as a machinist and living at 4416 14th Street, when he was married in Tillsonburg on April 2, 1923 to Mae Lillian Oatman (1887-1978) of Tillsonburg.  Mae was born at Cornell, Norwich Township, Oxford County, the daughter of Albert Oatman & Mary F. Hicks.
In 1930, they moved to Copenhagen where they lived for a number of years.
Hughston died on September 22, 1951 in London. He and his wife are buried in Dorchester Union cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 24, 1951:
HUGH C. SINCLAIR BORN IN SPRINGFIELD
London, Ont., Sept. 24 – Hugh Clarence Sinclair, 63, of 41 Garfield Avenue, died suddenly at his home on Saturday.  He was born in Springfield, Ontario, and was a resident of London for the past eight years. He was a stock keeper at Westminster Hospital.  He was a member of Union Lodge No. 380 A.F. and A. M., the Royal Arch, and the Xello Grotto. He served four years overseas in World War I with the 16th Battalion.  Surviving are his wife, the former May L. Oatman, of London; a son, Jack of Byron; a daughter, Mrs. Alton (Marjorie) Haight, of London; a brother, Mack, of Detroit; two sisters, Mrs. James Corless and Mrs. Walter Wilcox, both of Springfield; and two grandchildren.  The body is att he James E. Gordanier Funeral Home, where service will be conducted Tuesday at 2 p.m. by the Rev. J. H. Slimon, of Adelaide Street Baptist Church. Burial will be in Dorchester Union Cemetery.

Eric Edward Sinden

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Eric Sinden was born on May 5, 1899 in Bayham, the son of John Sinden (1854-1938) & Mary Jane Kenney (1862-1955).  John was born in South Norwich Township, the son of Albert & Philadelphia Sinden, and was living in Dereham Township when he was married there on October 14, 1884 to Mary Jane Kenney, of Dereham, the daughter of John & Mary Jane Kenney. They are buried in Best cemetery, Corinth.
Eric was a farmer living at RR #1 Corinth when he enlisted for service on June 8, 1918 in London.
Eric Sinden moved to British Columbia where he was married on April 6, 1922 in New Westminster to Jennie Stewart Bryson (1899-1960).
He died on May 16, 1973 in North Vancouver, British Columbia.

George Albert Sinden

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George Sinden was born on November 18, 1896 in Bayham, the son of John Sinden (1854-1938) & Mary Jane Kenney (1862-1955).  John was born in South Norwich Township, the son of Albert & Philadelphia Sinden, and was living in Dereham Township when he was married there on October 14, 1884 to Mary Jane Kenney, of Dereham, the daughter of John & Mary Jane Kenney. They are buried in Best cemetery, Corinth.
George was a farmer living in Bayham when he was married on November 28, 1917 in Corinth to Hilda Starkey (born 1897), a native of England living in Bayham, the daughter of William Starkey & Elizabeth Wildman.
George was farming at RR #1 Corinth when he enlisted for service on June 24, 1918 in London.
He died in 1973 and is buried in Best cemetery, Corinth.

James Archibald Sitts

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James Sitts was born on May 9, 1895 in Oxford County, the son of Elijah Sitts (ca 1863-1932) & Elizabeth Lawrie.  Elijah was born in Dereham Township, the son of Peter & Sarah Sitts, and was a farmer living on the 11th Concession of Dereham when he was married on September 11, 1884 in Tillsonburg to Elizabeth Lawrie, also of the 11th concession of Dereham, a native of Banting, Sterlingshire Scotland, daughter of Thomas & Jane Lawrie.  They are buried in Tillsonburg cemetery.
James was a farmer living with his parents at R.R. #1 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 12, 1918 in London.  They lived at lot 31, concession 7, Malahide
James was farming in Malahide when he was married on May 1, 1923 in Aylmer to Hazel Stephens (1893-1970), also of Malahide, the daughter of James Stephens & Loureine Swartz.
James died on November 15, 1959 and is buried with Hazel in Richmond West cemetery. They had at two children, Harold A. Sitts (1924-1966), and Loureine Sitts (1927).
James’ obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, November 19, 1959:
JAS. A. SITTS DIES SUDDENLY
A heart attack suffered at his home on Sunday night proved fatal to James Archie Sitts, R.R. 1 Aylmer.  He was 64.  Mr. Sitts was born in Oxford County on May 9, 1895, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Elijah Sitts.  He had lived most of his life in this district, farming east of Aylmer on No. 3 highway.  Mr. Sitts was a member of Richmond United Church and of the Brotherhood Class of that church. Surviving are his widow, the former Hazel Stephens; one son, Harold Sitts, at home; one daughter, Mrs. Clarence (Loureina) Milmine, of Eden; two brothers, Perry Sitts of Tillsonburg; and Harry Sitts of Bedford, Ohio; three sisters, Mrs. Lucy Pepper, of Simcoe; Mrs. Fred (Bessie) Staib, R.R. 1 Aylmer; Mrs. Clara Fleming, of Delmer; two grandchildren, Brenda and Gail Milmine, and a number of nieces and nephews. The remains rested at the Hughson Funeral Home in Aylmer where Mr. Dwight Hinton conducted the service Wednesday afternoon at three o’clock. Interment followed in the Richmond Cemetery.

Hubert Clayton Smale

189340  Hubert Clayton Smale
Clayton Smale was born on July 19, 1889 at Florence in Middlesex County (or Lambton), the son of Jonas Smale (1866-1918) & Sarah Ann Rice. Jonas was the son of Isaac Smale & Rebecca Matthews,  and was living in South Dumfries when he was married on July 6, 1887 in Branchton, North Dumfries, to Sarah Rice, of Branchton, daughter of Robert & Fanny Rice.
The family is found on the 1891 census in Galt, and in the 1901 census in South Dumfries Township, Brant County.  Jonas & Sarah are buried in St. George United Church cemetery, South Dumfries.
Clayton was living Tillsonburg when he was married on April 12, 1911 in Langton, Ontario to Ida Belle Walker (1894-1967), the daughter of James Rederick Walker & Mary Mariah Armstrong.
Clayton was a fisherman living in Port Burwell when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion, on November 11, 1915 at Port Burwell.  He had served six years with the Brant Dragoons.
Clayton later moved to Pontiac, Michigan in the 1930s, but returned to Brantford about 1934.
Clayton died on November 13, 1939, and is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Brantford.  The inscription on his monument reads as follows: “Private Hubert C. Smale, 2nd Battn. C.E.F.  13 November 1939 Rest in Heaven”
His obituary appeared in the Brantford Expositor, November 14, 1939:
H. CLAYTON SMALE
H. Clayton Smale, 42 Eagle Avenue, Brantford, passed away Monday evening in Christie Street Hospital in his fifty-first year after an illness of six weeks duration. Mr. Smale was born in Exeter, Ontario, and was a resident of this city for the past 21 years. He saw active service during the First Great War, leaving St. Thomas with the 91st Battery and was a member of the local Branch of the Canadian Legion. He was a member of Colborne United Church. Besides his sorrowing wife he leaves to mourn his loss one daughter and one son, Mrs. Albert Mountroy, River Rouge, Michigan; and Ellis Clayton at home; his mother, Mrs. Sarah Smale, Brantford; three brothers and three sisters, Ordera, Brantford; Robert Leslie and Howard Bruce, Pontiac, Michigan; Mrs. Clarence Silverthorne, Burford; Mrs. Alvin Armstrong and Mrs. Arthur Armstrong, Pontiac, Michigan.  Mr. Smale is resting at his residence until Thursday when the funeral will be held from Reid and Brown’s Chapel in the afternoon. Interment will be in the Soldiers Plot in Mount Hope cemetery.

Allen Smith

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Allen Smith was born on February 2, 1890 in Yorkshire, England, the son of John Henry Smith & Mary Hughes. He emigrated to Canada about 1904, and was farming at Corinth when he was married on July 8, 1909 in Port Burwell to Eva Pearl Bradley, of Vienna, the daughter of Alonzo Bradley & Hannah Bearss.  Allan & Pearl are found on the 1911 census in Bayham Township, living with her parents.
Allen was farming in Bayham when he enlisted for service on October 9, 1915 in London. He served overseas with the 70th Battalion. Following the war he returned to Elgin County and lived for several years in St. Thomas.  He died on April 15, 1964 at the age of 74, and is buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, April 16, 1964:
AYLMER MAN DROWNS IN CREEK
AYLMER – A 74-year-old Aylmer man, Allen Smith, of Talbot Street, drowned in Catfish Creek here last night after a fishing trip. His body was found west of the Dingle Street bridge at about 10 p.m. by Archie Mizon and Daniel Vandierendonck.  The Aylmer police said Mr. Smith had been fishing with his son, Gordon, until it became dark. Mr. Smith Jr., with whom Mr. Smith Sr. was living, returned home and became alarmed when his father did not return. He asked Mr. Mizon to help look for his father.  The body was taken to the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital where a post mortem, held this morning, confirmed Mr. Smith died of drowning.
Mr. Smith was a former resident of St. Thomas and had lived with his son, Leslie, until the latter died two months ago. It was then he moved to Aylmer to live with his son at 34 Talbot Street.  Coming from England at the age of 14, Mr. Smith had resided in this area the greater part of his life. He was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 41, St. Thomas. During the First World War he served overseas with the 70th Battalion and in the Second World War he served in Canada with the Veterans Guard.
He was a son of the late John Henry Smith and Mary Hughes, and is survived by his wife, the former Pearl Bradley, of Aylmer; two sons, Gordon, of Aylmer, and Norman, of Orwell.  Several grandchildren and great grandchildren also survive.  Resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home, where the service will be conducted Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock by Rev. J. L. Petrie, padre of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 41. Interment will be made in the St. Thomas Cemetery with the Royal Canadian Legion conducting a graveside service.

Arthur Smith

The name Arthur Smith appears on a Springfield Honor Roll, but he cannot be positively identified.
There is an Arthur Oscar Smith, born about 1879 in Aylmer, son of Oscar Smith & Charity Ann Smith.  The family is found on the 1881 Malahide census; and Ann as a widow in Aylmer on the 1891 and 1901 census.  Oscar was born about 1845 in Niagara Falls, the son of William P. & Catherine Smith, and was a widower living in Adelaide Township, Middlesex County when he was married on December 3, 1877 in Aylmer to Ann Smith (1848-1919), of Aylmer, a native of Fonthill, daughter of Jarrod & Margaret Smith.  Oscar died on March 8, 1887 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  Ann died in St. Thomas on October 26, 1919 and is buried with her husband in Aylmer cemetery.
Arthur Oscar Smith was a labourer living in St. Thomas when he was married there on December 23, 1903 to Lizzie Comber, a native of England living in St. Thomas, daughter of John Comber & Mary Slaughton.
Arthur & Lizzie cannot be found on the 1911 census, nor can an attestation paper be found for him.  There are 216 attestation papers bearing the name “Arthur Smith”, and several that are not available for viewing.
When his mother died in 1919, Arthur was living in the “northwest”, presumably meaning one of the prairie provinces.  It cannot be determined if this is the Arthur Smith referred to on the Springfield Honor Roll.

Carl D. Smith

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Carl Smith was born on August 2, 1897 at Avon in Middlesex County, the son of David Smith & Minnie E. McLachlan.  David was the son of Murray & Martha Smith, and was a farmer living in North Dorchester when he was married on October 20, 1896 to Minnie E. McLachlan, also of North Dorchester, the daughter of Duncan & Catherine McLachlan. They are buried in Dorchester Union Cemetery.
Carl was living with his parents at R.R. #1 Mossley when he enlisted for service on June 12, 1918 in London.
He died on October 24, 1918 at the age of 21 from influenza and emphysema, at his home, lot 5, concession 5, North Dorchester Township. He is buried in Dorchester Union Cemetery.

Charles Joseph Smith

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Charles Smith was born on April 19, 1897 in Yarmouth, the son of George William Smith (1864-1939) & Bertha Bridget Cromwell (1869-1947).  George was the son of John A. & Charity Smith and was living in Yarmouth when he was married on April 23, 1889 in Aylmer to Bertha Cromwell, of Malahide, daughter of Josiah & Bridget.  They are buried in West Ave Cemetery, St. Thomas.
Charles was a farmer living at R.R. #5 Aylmer with his parents when he enlisted for service on May 31, 1918 in London.
He was living in St. Thomas and employed on the Michigan Central Railroad when he was married on September 16, 1919 at New Sarum to Carrie Hazel Howe (1898-1972), of Aylmer, the daughter of William Howe & Rose Smith.
Charles died on September 19, 1951 and is buried in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 20, 1951:
CHARLES J. SMITH DIES IN 55TH YEAR
Belmont District Farmer Ill Since Last March
AYLMER, Sept. 20 – Charles Joseph Smith, RR 2 Glanworth, died Wednesday night at his home near Belmont. He had been ailing since March. Mr. Smith was in his 55th year, being born in Yarmouth Township, a son of the late Mr and Mrs George Smith.
Mr. Smith had farmed for some years but prior to that worked for a number of years for the New York Central Railroad out of St. Thomas. A resident of the district all his life, he had also lived for a time at St. Thomas and Kingsmill.  He served for a time as a trustee for S.S. 27 Yarmouth and was also a member of Hiawatha Street Baptist Church in St. Thomas.
Surviving are his wife, the former Carrie Howe of the Aylmer district; three daughters, Mrs. Fred (Hazel) Tribe of Ridgetown; Mrs. Harvey (Jean) Cornish of St. Thomas; Mrs. Alfred (Ruth) Perry of London, Ont.; one grandson Robert Cornish; three brothers, John and Herman of Detroit, and George of Toronto; and three sisters, Mrs. Jerry Mann, Mrs. John Simpson and Mrs. Thomas Woofenden, all of Detroit.  Several nieces and nephews also survive.
At rest at the Hughson Funeral Home, Aylmer, where service will be held Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Interment in Elmdale Memorial Park, St. Thomas.

Frederick William Smith

190195  Fred Smith
Frederick Smith was born on January 9, 1881 at Orwell in Malahide, the son of Frederick W. Smith (1844 – 1917) & Anna Wilson.  Frederick Sr. was born in Southwold township, the son of John & Abigail Smith, and was an innkeeper in Aylmer when he was married on February 25, 1878 in Malahide to Anna Wilson, a native of North Dorchester living in Aylmer, the daughter of William & Mabel Wilson.  Fred Smith Sr., an innkeeper,  died in Orwell (concession 6 Malahide), on April 6, 1917 while his son was overseas. He is buried in Aylmer cemetery.
He was a cooper living in Aylmer when he was married on November 11, 1901 to Flossie May Procure, a native of Bayham living in Aylmer, the daughter of Nelson Procure & Emily Newton. On that record, Fred gives his parents names as F. W. Smith & Katherine Wallace. His obituary gives his mother’s name as Catherine Robson.
Frederick was a cooper living at 209 Centre Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted there for service on March 26, 1916.  He states he is legally separated, and names his next of kin as John Newton, of 70 St. Catherine Street, St. Thomas, the guardian of this three children, Harold, Frederick & Catherine.
Frederick & Flossie had four children: Frederick Charles (1902); Harold Arthur (1903); Emily Catherine (1906) and Edward Donald (born and died 1908). There is also a birth registration for a Frederick Nelson Smith in 1905, son of Frederick & Flossie.
A letter from Fred to his father was printed in the Aylmer Express, September 7, 1916:
A LETTER FROM FRED W. SMITH
A son of Fred Smith, of Orwell, now with the 91st Battalion in England. He was one of the boys who got the smoking outfit from the Empire Flour Mills, St. Thomas. Since writing, he has been drafted for France:
West Sandling, England, August 4, 1916
Dear Father –
I received your letter, and am glad to hear that you are all well.  I am well.  We were on parade this morning before General Sir Sam Hughes. About 20,000 or 30,000 Canadian tropps were there yesterday. I had a bath in the English Channel, and the water is very salty.  We are now shooting at the ranges; have another week to shoot yet, and have taken instruction on gas helmets. We have a black bear, a goat, dogs and cats in the camp. I am now in B. Co., 39th Battalion.
Was on a route march for two days last week and slept in a large field all night. I have seen Ireland and Scotland, Liverpool and London. We go to the Metropolois at nights, Saturdays and Sundays.
Hythe and Folkestone are on the shores of the English Channel.  I am only 30 miles from France, and heard the guns firing yesterday.  Have seen lots of aeroplanes. Nine of us sleep in one tent.  I am going to Hythe, and maybe to Folkestone, this afternoon. Will get some postcards.  Send me a St. Thomas paper every week. I saw Brock Brown at Hythe. He was wounded in the side and shoulder. You boys know him – he worked in the mill.
I have been to Shornecliffe and I am going up to London – only costs $1.25 return. The boat we crossed on had nine or ten decks, and maybe more. There were 7,000 of us on her. Every time I went on deck I got lost. We could look over the top of the stores in Halifax from the top deck. We had a fine trip over. Write soon.
With love to you all, Fred.
Fred W. Smith, 190195; D. Co., 91st Batt.; Army Post Office, London, England.
The Aylmer Express of September 6, 1917 reports that Fred had been wounded:
Pte. Fred W. Smith, son of Mrs. Fred Smith, of Orwell, is reported wounded on Aug. 15th. Pte. Smith enlisted with the 91st Battalion and went through the big fight at Vimy Ridge without a scratch. This is the first time he has been wounded and was reported to be in a French hospital.  Pte. Smith has two sons, who reside with his mother at Orwell.
A photograph of Fred, with the following caption, appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 20, 1917:
Pte. Fred W. Smith, son of Mrs. Smith and the late Fred Smith, of Orwell. Pte. Smith enlisted and went to England with the 91st Battalion. He has been through most of the famous engagements with the Canadians, the hottest possibly being at Vimy Ridge of Easter Monday last. He came through without a scratch. But on August 15th last, he suffered severe wounds and has since been in the hospital. Pte. Smith has two young sons who are living with their grandmother at Orwell.
Frederick died on February 6, 1941 at Westminster Hospital, London.  He is buried in South Park Cemetery, St. Thomas, where his name appear on a military marker:
“Pte. Fred W. Smith, 190195, The Great War, 1914-1918″
His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, February 6, 1941:
WAR VETERAN DEAD AT WESTMINSTER
Fred Smith in St. Thomas for 40 Years
Frederick William Smith, 60 year old St. Thomas resident of 22 McIntyre Street, died Thursday evening at Westminster Hospital, London, after suffering a stroke. Mr. Smith, a Great War veteran and a resident of St. Thomas for the past 40 years, has been in ill health for the last few years. He spent three weeks in the Memorial Hospital and had been removed to the Westminster Hospital for about a week before his death occurred. He was born in Orwell, a son of the late Frederick Smith and Catherine Robson, and he had lived in Aylmer, Orwell and New Sarum as well as St. Thomas. He was a cooper by trade during the early years of his life. He went overseas with the 91st Battalion and after the war he worked at the P.M.R. shops in St. Thomas. Previous to going overseas he had worked for some time in the Empire Flour Mills.  He was an active worker and member of the Canadian Legion. His wife predeceased him 14 years ago.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Harry Stokes, R.R. 2 Glanworth and Miss Irene Smith, Hamilton; three sons, Harold Smith, Kirkland Lake; Frederick Smith, New Liskeard; and William Smith, Hamilton; also one sister, Mrs. William Smith of London. There are nine grandchildren.
The remains are resting at the C. A. Towers and Son Funeral Home and the funeral will take place from there on Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Interment will be in the soldiers’ plot in the South Park Cemetery.

George R. Smith

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The name “George R. Smith” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Bayham.
According to his attestation paper, George R. Smith was born on February 16, 1888 at Burton-on-Strathe, Lincolnshire, England. A birth registration was found for a George Richard Smith in the January-March quarter of 1888 in Lincolnshire.  On the 1891 census for the parish of Holy Trinity, Yorkshire, in England, there is a George R. Smith, age 3, born Burton Stather, Lincolnshire, son of Herbert C. & Elizabeth Smith. These references may be for the same George Smith.
 He enlisted for service on October 29, 1914 in St. Thomas.  His address is given as R.R. #1 Aylmer.  He was a dairyman, and not married.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Story, of Summangorry Road, Hull, England.
G. R. Smith is also listed as one of the “Aylmer Boys” in training in London, Ont., in a letter from them dated November 23, 1914.  It is believed he is the “Dick Smith” referred to in a letter from Douglas Dunnett which appeared in the East Elgin Reformer, January 6, 1916, referring to Dick Smith as the first Aylmer boy to be wounded.  The fact that Dick Smith had been wounded was also reported in the East Elgin Reformer, November 18, 1915 in a letter from Bob Brackstone:
AYLMER BOY WOUNDED
Dick Smith, of the Fighting 18th Battalion, Wounded by Shrapnel
Pte. Brackstone’s Letter to the Editor
From “Somewhere in France” Pte. Bob Brackstone writes of the wounding of Dick Smith of C. Company, 18th Battalion. The letter is dated Nov. 1, 1915. At that date the rest of the Aylmer boys were well. The letter follows:
“Dear Mr. Powell – Just a few more lines to say that the boys of Aylmer are feeling fine, except Dick Smith, who was wounded in the head while carrying messages to the officers in the front line. I can tell you, all the boys feel pretty bad over it, but still we never know when our turn is coming. We are up to our knees in mud. It rains nearly all the time. We have just been issued raincoats, so they will help us a bit. But it’s rotten walking about in the mud. We must put up with it till the war is over. I hope that will be soon, and everybody thinks the same now. I hope Dick will soon be better and rejoin the company. I must now draw my letter to a close, hoping we will all meet again. I remain your sincere friend, R. H. Brackstone”
The Aylmer Express reports an auction sale for a George R. Smith of lot 34, concession 6, Malahide in 1921.  It cannot be determined if this is the same man.
No further information is known.

Dr. George Smith

The name “Dr. George Smith” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Vienna.
George Chauncey Smith was born on February 15, 1872 in Bayham, the son of William Smith (1838-1908) & Frances Emma Martin (1847-1903).  William was living in Houghton Township, Norfolk County when he was married on May 12, 1863 in Elgin County to Frances Martin, also of Houghton, the daughter of Ephraim & Anne Martin. William & Frances are buried in Claus Cemetery, Bayham township.
George Chauncey Smith, a physician, age 36, living in West Salem, Ohio,  was married on July 29, 1908 in New Sarum to Leota Myrtle Cloes, 29, of New Sarum, the daughter of Lorenzo Dow Cloes & Melissa Doan.
No attestation paper can be found for Dr. Smith.
George C. Smith died on June 17, 1961 and is buried with is wife Leota (1876-1944)  in the Old English Cemetery, Walnut Street, St. Thomas

Hubert Ivor Smith

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Hubert Smith was born on October 23, 1895 in Malahide, the son of Samuel D. Smith (1861-1950) & Florence May Porter (1866-1951).  Samuel was born in the United States, the son of John & Mary Smith, and was a carpenter living in Aylmer when he was married on June 27, 1887 in Malahide to Florence Porter, of Malahide, the daughter of John & Rosanna Porter.
The family moved to Windsor where they were living at 7 Crawford Ave., when Hubert enlisted for service on January 5, 1918 in London.  Hubert was a machinist.
He was living at 56 Elm Ave., Windsor, employed as a die sinker when he was married on October 27, 1924 at Sandwich in Essex County to Laura Elizabeth Smith (1900-1974), of 344 Sandwich Street, Sandwich, the daughter of Frederick Smith & Dorothea Brownlee.
Hubert & Laura moved to Detroit in 1925 where they are found on the 1930 census.  He died on January 29, 1985 in Livonia, Michigan.

Joseph Allan Smith

3139407
Joseph Smith was born on November 3, 1891 in Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, the son of William James Smith & Agnes Marilla Crozier (1862-1923).  William was born in Charlotteville, the son of Jacob & Agnes Smith, and was a widower living in Charlotteville when he was married on December 25, 1884 in Delhi to Agnes Crozier, also of Charlotteville, daughter of James W. & Janet Crozier. They later lived in Delhi and are buried in Delhi cemetery.
Joseph was living in Springfield employed as a steam engineer when he enlisted for service on July 10, 1918 in London. No further information is known.
Nelson Charles Smith
3138355
Nelson Charles Smith was born on February 9, 1895 in Aylmer, the son of Charles Henry Smith (1868-1905) & Mary Stewart (1869-1933). Charles died at lot 114, concession 6, Bayham.  Mary Stewart was the daughter of Alex Stewart & Christina McEachren.  She was living on Talbot Street in Aylmer when she died in 1933.  She and Charles are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Nelson Charles Smith was living in Aylmer, employed as a processor, when he enlisted for service on June 12, 1918 in London.
He was married on October 19, 1927 to Nellie Isabell McPhail (1905-1982), of Aylmer.
Nelson died on August 25, 1962 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary, from an undated clipping, follows:
NELSON C. SMITH DIES IN HOSPITAL
AYLMER – Nelson C. Smith, 124 John Street North, died in St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Saturday afternoon. He had been in ailing health for 15 years.
Born in Aylmer 67 years ago, he was a retired employee of Canadian Canners Ltd. He was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Charles Smith and had lived here all his life. He served as chief of the volunteer fire department for a number of years and was a member of St. Paul’s United Church.
He is survived by his wife, the former Nellie McPhail; two sons, Gordon, Rutherford Avenue; and Donald, at home; a daughter, Marilyn, at home; two sisters, Mrs. A. R. (Ann) Underhill, Sarnia; Mrs. Beatrice Burns, London; and one grandson, Wayne Smith.
Resting at the Hughson Funeral Home here where service will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. Fred M. Ward, of the Aylmer Baptist Church, will officiate. Interment will be made in the family plot at Aylmer Cemetery.

W. R. Smith

A letter from W. R. Smith, of the 30th Battery, Aylmer, wrote a letter to Wyn Christie, which was published in the Aylmer Express, July 22, 1915.  This man cannot be found on the 1911 census in the Aylmer area, and without a first name, cannot be positively identified.  He obviously did live in Aylmer prior to enlisting, and the text of his letter is as follows:
Aylmer Boys of the 18th Battalion, C.E.F., Anxious to Get to the Front
The following letter was received by Wyn Christie this week:
Hello Wyn – Just a few line to let you know how I am getting along. I just got a London Free Press and read a piece in it about the Eighteenth having landed in France, which I know is untrue because we are still in England, but we don’t know how soon we will be there, maybe by the time you get this letter.  I don’t know how long we are going to stay, but write to this address anyway, and I will get your letter wherever I am.  We are doing physical exercises, bayonet practice, and all kinds of maneuvers that are needed to fix a man up for this campaign, because the men need to be on the alert, strong minded, and with a determination to win, in a war like this. We have aerial corps, red cross corps, scouts, motor cycles, dispatch riders, everything that is needed for this campaign stationed around us in England. There is nothing but soldiers and camps around here.  We are situated on the south coast of England and about sixteen miles from Dover, so you see we are about thirty miles from France yet.  The 16th Battery is about 2 miles from us, and us Aylmer boys go to see our home town boys in the battery. Col. Brown is down there and also the 7th Canadian Mounted Rifles.  How is the 30th Battery getting along? Are they progressing much?  I hope so anyway. Bill Such and I are with the buglers, Arthur Such and Dick Smith are in the scouts, and Bob Brackstone is working in the officer’s mess, the rest of the eleven are carrying rifles, except Douglas Dunnett, who is corporal of the scouts.  Well, the ink is running short so I will have to close my letter. I remain yours truly,
One of the 30th Battery Boys, W. R. Smith

William Thomas Smith

1289342
William Smith was born on February 21, 1872 in Springfield.  His parents names are unknown.  He was a farmer and single when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1915 in North Battleford, Saskatchewan.  He names his next of kin as Mrs. Sarah Downs, of Aylmer, but his relationship to her is not given.  He was discharged on February 19, 1915 for reasons not stated on his attestation paper, but probably because of his age or health.
Sarah Rebecca Downs (1851-1935) was the daughter of William F. & Margaret Chute and was born in Malahide. She married James Downs of Malahide on July 25, 1871 in Bayham.  They are found on the 1881 census in Bayham, but William Smith is not listed with them.

George Colin Smuck

802832
George Smuck was born on September 22, 1872 in Malahide, the son of William M. Smuck & Christina Ferguson. William was the son of John & Rebecca Smuck, and was living in Malahide when he was married there on December 5, 1871 to Christina Ferguson, also of Malahide, daughter of William & Elizabeth Ferguson.
George Smuck was a farmer living at Calton when he was married on October 5, 1894 at Calton to Jessie Lena Brooks (ca 1877 – 1949), the daughter of Jesse Corless Brooks & Mary Ann Silverthorn.
George & Lena moved to the Belmont area, farming at lot 6, concession 6, Westminster Township, and later lived in South Dorchester Township where they are found on the 1911 census.
George gives his address as Belmont when he enlisted for service on January 28, 1916 in London.  He enlisted with the 135th O.S. Battalion.
George & Lena had the following children: Mabel (1896-1968); Bessie (1899); William Merritt (1904); George Colin (1908), and Florence Mae.
George died on June 8 [or9], 1944, and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, London.  A military marker there bears the following inscription: “George C. Smuck, Pte. 135th Battn. C.E.F. 9 June 1944 age 89″
His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 10, 1944:
EX-BELMONT MAN, GEORGE SMUCK, DIES
LONDON, Ont., June 10 – George C. Smuck, of 541 Simcoe Street, for many years a resident of Belmont, died Thursday at Victoria Hospital.
Born in Elgin County, son of the late Mr and Mrs Merritt Smuck, he served overseas during the First Great War.  He is survived by his widow, Jessie E.; two sons, George C., and Merritt; three daughters, Mrs. Edward Dodd, Mrs. William Ward, and Mrs. Charles Burgess, all of London.

Charles Spencer Smyth

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Charles Smyth was born on February 14, 1896 in Port Burwell, the son of William H. Smyth (1863-1933) & Sarah Ada Bradfield (1864-1946).  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Charles was farming at Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on June 12, 1918 in Bayham.
He died on December 15, 1978 and is buried with his wife Helen M. Loucks (1905-1978) in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna. His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, December 15, 1978:
CHARLES S. SMYTH
Charles S. Smyth, formerly of Port Burwell, passed away at Maple Manor Nursing Home, Tillsonburg, on Friday, December 15, 1978, in his 82nd year.  Born at Port Burwell, February 14, 1897, he was a son of the late William Smyth and the former Ada Bradfield. He was a retired foreman on the tug Hercules at Port Burwell. His wife, the former Helen Loucks, predeceased him June 9, 1978.
Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Wayne (Pauline) Chatterton of Beachville; Mrs. Vivian Bates of 264 Lisgar Ave., Tillsonburg; and Mrs. Calvin (Joan) Timms of Mississauga; one son, Marvin Smyth of Port Burwell; 20 grandchildren, nine great grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Gretchen Loucks of Port Burwell; and several nieces and nephews.
Resting at the H. A. Ostrander and Son Funeral Home where service will be held Monday, December 18, at 1:30 p.m, conducted by Mr. Harry Alward of the Free Methodist Church, Tillsonburg.  Interment in St. Luke’s Cemetery, Vienna.

Huron Spencer Smyth

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Huron Smyth was born on August 8, 1896 in Vienna, the son of Edward Ervin Smyth (1868-1944) & Emily Shaver (1864-1939).  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Huron was a farmer living at Vienna when he enlisted for service on February 28, 1918.
He married Rebecca Dean (1906-1977), and died in 1958.  He and his wife are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna. The monument gives his year of birth as 1897.

Frank Snelgrove

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Frank Snelgrove was born on September 5, 1883 in Port Burwell, the son of William Snelgrove (1848-1890) & Cecilia Huffman (1857-1918).  William was born in Woodstock, the son of Jacob & Matilda Snelgrove and was a wagon maker in Port Burwell when he was married on October 4, 1878 in Bayham to Cecilia Huffman, a native of Bertie township living in Port Burwell, the daughter of George Huffman & Jane Watson.  William is buried in Estherville cemetery just north of Port Burwell.  Cecilia is buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Frank was farming at Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on April 3, 1918 in London.
He was married on May 25, 1918 in St. Thomas to Hazel Ida Vansickle (1894-1973), of Port Burwell, the daughter of Nelson Vansickle & Luella Haines.
Frank died in 1963 and is buried with his wife in Evergreen Cemetery, West Lorne.

Clarence Wendell Soper

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Wendell Soper was born on March 15, 1895 in Sombra Township, Lambton County, the son of John Henry Soper (1844-1922)& Eliza Ann Stratton (1853-1937). John was  the son of Levi Soper & Elizabeth Edmonds, and was a widower living in Bayham when he was married there on April 2, 1872 to Eliza Ann Stratton, also of Bayham, the daughter of David & Drusilla Stratton. John & Eliza moved back to Bayham township from Lambton County prior to the 1901 census.  They are buried in St. Luke’s Cemetery, Vienna.
Wendell was employed as a clerk in Englehart, Ontario when he enlisted for service on May 10, 1916 in North Bay.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Eliza Ann Soper, of Port Burwell.
Wendell arrived returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on April 5. He returned to Vienna where he was living when his father died in 1922.   He then moved to Essex County and was living in the town of Ford, employed as a mechanic, when he was married on August 30, 1924 in Leamington to Lillian Campbell, of Sandwich, the daughter of Alex Campbell & Mary L. Harris.  They had three children: Marjorie May, Shirley Jacqueline and John Alexander.
Wendell died on December 4, 1981 in Windsor.  His name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna. His obituary appeared in the Windsor Star, December 4, 1981:
SOPER – C. Wendell, Friday, Dec. 4, 1981 at Grace Hospital. Late of Riverside Dr. E., Beloved husband of Rita Soper and the late Lillian (1969). Dear father of Mrs. Robert Hearns (Marjorie), Bath, Ont.; Mrs. Donald Vicary (Shirley), Burlington, and John Soper, Petrolia. 7 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren also survive.  Mr. Soper was a member of St. Paul’s United Church and Vienna Lodge A.F. & A.M. #237, and a veteran of World War I.  Friends may call at the Don Morris Funeral Home, 68 Giles Blvd E., after 2 p.m. Sunday. Funeral service in the Memorial Chapel Monday Dec. 7 at 2 p.m. Rev. Gordon Pickell officiating. Cremation to follow. If you so desire donations may be made to the Cancer Fund.

Lawrence Leonard Soper

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Lawrence Soper was born on November 13, 1896 in Vienna, the son of Owen Ed Soper (1869-1935) & Nellie E. Griffin (1874-1956).  Owen was the son of Leonard & Mary Ann Soper and was farming in Bayham when he was married there on December 13, 1893 to Nellie Griffin, also of Bayham, the daughter of Madison & Barbara Helen Griffin.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Lawrence was employed as a railway brakeman and living at 15 Malakoff Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on March 14, 1916 in Tillsonburg.  He had served seven months with the 30th Battery in Aylmer.
A letter from Lawrence was printed in the Aylmer Express, March 15, 1917:
APPRECIATES GIFTS FROM HOME
The following letter was received by Mr. Clare Robertson from Pte. L. Soper at East Sandling.
Dear Clare –
I received your welcome letter and was glad I put my name on the outside of it when I found you had opened it. I have often wondered how you were and your mother told me to be sure and write when I was at the carnival at Straffordville on July 1st, so I thought I would drop Ray a few lines. This life is a lot different than civic life, and I suppose we won’t be of much use for a time after we come back. I told father all I would be good for was to ride around and sleep and most of all eat. Mother sent me a box with a tin can of honey and I got a box from the boys in my S.S. class home. I am supposed to have two more coming, and mother sent one quite a long time ago, but I have not got it yet. I often get papers from home, and they always send me a few Boys Worlds. I was on draft for France last week but was on guard the day they were called, so they put another fellow in my place. I was glad as I was the only one of we four boys to go. Now three of us are to be transferred to the Royal Engineers, and Albert Ferris is the only one to be left. I wish we could all go, but such is the life in the army. We are having lovely weather now. It froze up a week ago and snowed a little. It is a great treat after so much mud. I only wish I had your chance for a skate for a few days. We were up to Edinburgh, Scotland for a six day pass when we first landed here, and I had a skate on artificial ice there one day. They go in for fancy work there. I had a little gospel of St. John’s given to me by Lord Roberts, and it has a few hymns in the back. I was glad to get your book, Clare, and you don’t know how much we boys need God over here. We don’t seem to realize it though. I am glad you have given your heart fo Christ, Clare, and he will always stay by you and be your friend. Please give me a place in your prayers. Say, Clare, you would laugh if you could see some of the articles they work with here. They put one horse ahead of the other, and the wagons are great high things. The roads are all paved here and very very narrow. We go for some long route marches and they are hard on the feet. Well, Clare, I must close for tonight, so give my best regards to your father and mother.
Ever your friend, Lawrence.
Lawrence returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Boston, Massachusetts on May 29. He returned to St. Thomas continuing his employment as a brakeman, and was married in St. Thomas on March 16, 1921 to Minnie Myrtle Calcott, of St. Thomas, the daughter of G. W. Calcott & Harriet Ayearst.
Lawrence died on October 17, 1965 and is buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, October 18, 1965:
LARRY SOPER DIES IN HOSPITAL
Lawrence Leonard (Larry) Soper, of 20 Maple Street, died Sunday in the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, after an illness of several months. He was in his 69th year.
Born in Vienna, he was a son of the late Owen and Nellie Griffin Soper. Mr Soper had lived in St. Thomas since young adulthood and was the retired manager of the Wonder Bakeries branch in the city. He had been employed with the Times-Journal after retiring, until the time of his illness.
Well known in fraternal circles, Mr. Soper was a member of Rathbone Lodge, Knights of Pythias, St. Thomas; a member of the Oddfellows Lodge No. 76, St. Thomas; a member of the Vienna Masonic Lodge and the A.M.O.S. of St. Thomas. He also belonged to the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 41, St. Thomas and was a member of Central United Church.
He was a veteran of World War I and served overseas with the 168th Battalion from Woodstock.
Immediate family survivors beside his wife, the former Minnie Calcott, are one son, Gordon L. Soper, of Aurora, Ont., and one daughter, Mrs. Donald (Dorothy) Clarke, 15 Rapelje Street.  Other survivors are three brothers, Vern Soper and Clifford Soper, both of Vienna and Arba Soper, 9 Erie Street; one sister, Mrs. Mildred Godby, of Flint, Mich. There are also nine surviving grandchildren.
Resting at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home where service will be held Wednesday at 2 p.m. Interment will be in the St. Thomas Cemetery.

William Henry Soper

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William Soper was born on February 23, 1890 in Vienna, the son of William Melvin Soper & Sarah Jane Douglas.  William Melvin Soper was the son of Levi Soper & Elizabeth Lounsberry, and was farming in Bayham when he was married there on October 9, 1878 to Sarah Douglas, a native of New Brunswick living in Bayham, the daughter of John & Phoebe Douglas.  They are buried in Tillsonburg Cemetery.  There is some conflicting information regarding Sarah Douglas.  William’s delayed birth registration, sworn by his sister in 1944, gives their mother’s name as Sarah Douglas.  Her name is also Sarah Douglas on her marriage registration.  However, William Henry Soper gives his mother’s name on his marriage registration as Sarah McGregor.  Her death registration states that her father’s name was William McGregor and her mother’s maiden name Stilwell.
William was a baker living at 35 Church Street, Windsor when he enlisted for service there on April 1, 1916. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 17.
Following the war, William returned to Windsor where he was again employed as a baker and living at 329 Pitt Street, when he was married on November 8, 1921 in Sarnia to Myrtle Maria Brown, of Sarnia, the daughter of Gilbert & Esther Brown.
William died on July 3, 1947 in Windsor and is buried in Windsor Grove Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Windsor Star, July 3, 1947:
WILLIAM H. SOPER
William H. Soper of 580 Grove Avenue, died today at his residence. He was born in Vienna, Ontario, and lived in Windsor for 29 years. He formerly resided in Amherstburg and Tillsonburg. Mr. Soper was a baker and attended St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. He was a member of Thistle Lodge No. 34, A.F. & A.M., Amherstburg.
Mr. Soper is survived by his wife, Myrtle, and three sisters, Miss Martha Soper and Mrs. Motta Wood, both at home, and Mrs. W. H. (Ella) Shiner of Pontiac, Mich.
Services will be conducted on Saturday at 2 p.m. from the James H. Sutton Funeral Home, 931 Ouellette Avenue. Burial will be in the Windsor Grove Cemetery.

Gordon Roy Spencer

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Gordon Spencer was born on December 27, 1896 in Eden, the son of John Albert Spencer (1864-1928) & Mary Mahala Vanloon (1865-1946).  John was born in Prince Edward County, Ontario, the son of Abel & Annie Spencer, and was living in Bismark (West Lorne), employed in railroading when he was married there on April 14, 1885 to Mary Vanloon, a native of Walpole Township, Haldimand County, living in Aldborough, the daughter of John & Elizabeth Vanloon. In 1917 they were living at 280 South Christina Ave., Sarnia.  They are buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue.
Gordon moved to the United States in 1913 at the age of 16, and was employed as a stockman living in Detroit when he enlisted for service on May 28, 1917 in Windsor.  He was transferred from the 64th Battery to the 63rd Battery.
Following the war, he may have returned to Detroit, where a Gordon Spencer is found on the 1930 census there, age 36, born in Canada, with wife Alta.  He emigrated to the United States in 1915 and is the manager of a grocery.

Herbert Alfred Spencer

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Herbert Spencer was born on January 16, 1894 in London, England, the son of Edward George Spencer (1865-1950) & Alice Amilia Shellum (1872-1928).  Herbert enlisted for service on February 5, 1915 in Toronto.  He was a clerk, and names his next of kin as his father, Edward, of Brantford.  Herbert moved to Aylmer in 1960, and died in 1991.  He and his wife are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Herbert’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 20, 1991, accompanied by a photograph:
FIRST GREAT WAR HERO DIES AT 97
Herbert Alfred Spencer, 97, of Terrace Lodge, a decorated veteran of the First Great War, died at Elgin Manor, St. Thomas, on Sunday, March 17, 1991.  Mr. Spencer was a lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Dragoons Fifth Cavalry Brigade, First Machine Gun Squadron during the war, and was awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in Action. The certificate he was presented read, “During the operation on the night of the 8 / 9th of July against four lines of enemy defenses east of Ascension Farm, 2,000 yards in front of the Outpost Line, was one of the gun detachment of an advanced machine gun which formed part of the barrage. Although the gun position was heavily shelled, with great determination and coolness he continued to fire his gun, which assisted materially to the success of the operation. He has done similar good work in previous raids on this front.”
Mr. Spencer’s son Stephen Spencer recalled stories he was told about his father’s participation in the war. One night, Mr. Spencer had to sleep in a mausoleum in a graveyard because with German shelling, it was the only safe place to catch a nap.  He kept diaries while he fought in Europe. One still has a poppy pressed in it.  The flower was picked from Flanders Field.  Although Mr. Spencer told some anecdotes about the war, much of it was difficult for him to talk about.  Like many First Great War veterans, his memories were too horrible.  After being discharged from the army in 1919, he lived in England for a couple of years before moving to Panama.  There he was connected with the British Legation, but his son wasn’t exactly sure what that entailed.  He also managed a brewery there. Stephen recalled a story about his father’s connection with England’s Royal Family. Once, while Edward, Prince of Wales was in Panama, he and Mr. Spencer drank champagne “in the bowels of a battleship.”  Both apparently had a good time.  The family still has photographs of Mr. Spencer with King George V and Prince Edward, who later abdicated the throne.  The Spencer family moved to Chicago in 1940 when Herbert was appointed Trade Commissioner for the Canadian Government.  He continued in that post until it was taken over by External Affairs Canada.
Mr. Spencer eventually retired in the 1950s. He travelled with his wife Lillian, eventually settling in Aylmer in 1960 because he had relatives in the area.  Stephen describes his father as a reserved man. “He was adventuresome but not garrulous. He was classy”.  All his life he had a love of adventure, and was ready and willing to try anything that interested him.  “Dad would be willing to do just about anything.  He was quite an amazing character”.  Once, while Stephen was working in Sioux Lookout, Ontario, his father visited. He ended up working as a cook for tree planting crews.  It wasn’t easy cooking in a tent, producing meals for 30 or 40 men, but he enjoyed it.  Stephen adds that his father loved to travel. In fact, he never really settled down. After his wife Lillian died in 1973, Mr. Spencer would travel to visit his children, stopping at his apartment in Aylmer in between trips.
Because of his experiences in the war, Mr. Spencer never missed a Remembrance Day service until 1990 at the age of 96.  About 20 years ago, he shook hands with Queen Elizabeth at the service in Ottawa.  Stephen says his father was very proud of that moment.  He was also proud of his friendship with former Canadian Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson.  When he was campaigning once in this area, Mr. Pearson got off a train, ignoring all the “bigwigs” to chat with Mr. Spencer.  Stephen describes his father as being a very colourful gentleman who remained active until quite recently.  Mr. Spencer was a member of Masonic Lodge in Chicago and Panama, of Scottish Rite in Chicago, and Royal Arch Masons and Shriners in Panama.
He was born in London, England, on January 16, 1894, son of Edward George and Alice Amilia (Shellum) Spencer, and emigrated with them to Canada at the age of six months.  Mr. Spencer is survived by sons and daughters-in-law Humphrey O. and Barbara Spencer of Chicago; Stephen H. and Yvette of Ottawa; daughter Joan Stone of Memphis; sister Dorothy Randall and her husband Ellison of Aylmer; a number of grandchildren and great grandchildren.  He was predeceased by his wife Lillian (Fearon) Spencer in 1973.  Mr. Spencer was an adherent of Trinity Anglican Church.
Canon Robert A. C. Mills of Trinity Anglican Church will conduct the funeral service from H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home on Thursday, March 21 at 11 a.m. Burial will follow in Aylmer cemetery. Members of Aylmer Legion will hold a memorial service at the funeral home at 7 p.m. Wednesday evening.  Members of Malahide Masonic Lodge No. 140 A.F. and A.M. will hold a memorial service at 8 p.m.  Visitation at the funeral home will also be on Wednesday evening, from 7 to 9 p.m.

Captain William Patterson Spero

William P. Spero was born on February 8, 1892 in Roebuck, Augusta Township, Grenville County, the son of John Spero & Elizabeth Dunbar.  John was a blacksmith.  William was employed as a banker, and no doubt worked in Springfield.  He was living in Appin, Middlesex County, employed as a banker when he signed an Officer’s Declaration on December 1, 1915 in London.  He was a captain in the 135th Battalion; and belonged to the 26th Regiment.  He names his next of kin as his father, John, of R.R. #2 Prescott.
The Aylmer Express of April 4, 1918 reported the death of Captain Spero, formerly of Springfield. However, this was an error. But since the article gives some biographical material about him, it is included here:
SPRINGFIELD MOURNS DEATH OF CAPT. SPERO
General sorrow was expressed throughout the village when the news was received of the death of Capt. W. P. Spero. Captain Spero came here when but a lad as junior in the then Traders’ Bank, and remained nearly three years, during which time he was promoted to the position of teller. He was a young man of exemplary habits and was secretary of the Methodist S. S. for a couple of years. After his transfer to Glencoe, he made frequent visits and when he gave up his position to enlist all were interested and proud of his career as a soldier. He was a member of the local A.F. & A.M. lodge. It seems a coincidence that Edward Fright, who was one of the bank staff at the same time was also killed a short time ago.
 No follow-up story in the newspaper has been found to correct the above account, but Captain Spero survived the war and returned from overseas on July 28, 1918, arriving in New York.  His address is given as Prescott on the passenger list. He moved to Chapleau in the Sudbury district where he was a bank manager.  He was living there when married on July 6, 1921 in Toronto to Myrtle Marie Claridge, of Toronto, the daughter of Allan Claridge & Mary Jennings.  Their marriage was reported in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, July 11, 1921 in the Springfield news column:
The marriage was solemnized in Toronto, July 6, of Captain W. P. Spero, manager of the Royal Bank at Chapleau, and Miss Myrtle Marie, second daughter of Mr and Mrs Allan Claridge of Powell River, B.C., Rev. R. B. Cochrane officiating. Captain Spero was on the local bank staff here for three years previous to going overseas, and he has a host of friends who will extend congratulations.

Charles R. Spiece

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Charles Spiece was born at Straffordville on December 30, 1894, the son of Huldah Ann Spiece (1871-1954).  Huldah was the daughter of David Spiece (1837?-1902) & Sarah Catharine Horton (1844-1903).  David was born in Clinton Township, the son of Michael & Caroline Spiece, and was living in Caistor Township when he was married on September 2, 1867 in Wentworth County to Sarah Horton, also of Caistor, the daughter of John & Mary Ann Horton.  They are buried in Straffordville cemetery. Charles is living with his mother and her parents on the 1901 Bayham census.  Huldah was married on December 22, 1909 in Eden to Thomas D. Laur (1874-1929).  On the 1911 Bayham census, Charles is living with his mother & stepfather. Huldah & Thomas are buried in Straffordville cemetery.
Charles was a mechanic living in Brantford when he was married there on May 8, 1915 to Lavina Doris Carson (1895-1972), a native of England living in Brantford, the daughter of Arthur Carson & Annie Stratford.
Charles was a butter maker living at 29 Henrietta Street, Brantford when he enlisted for service there on February 8, 1916, with the 54th Depot Battery.
Charles died on June 20, 1983 in Brantford and is buried with his wife in Straffordville cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Brantford Expositor, June 20, 1983:
CHARLES SPIECE
At the John Noble Home on Monday, June 20, 1983, Charles Spiece, in his 90th year; beloved husband of the late Lavinia (Carson) Spiece; dear father of Mrs. Vera Bates of Port Burwell; David and John, both of Brantford, and father-in-law of Helen; also surviving are five grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren; predeceased by three brothers. Resting at the Hill and Robinson Funeral Home, Nelson and Queen Streets after 7 p.m., Monday. Funeral and committal services in the chapel on Tuesday, June 21 at 2 p.m. Rev. Douglas Madge officiating. Interment in Straffordville Cemetery, Straffordville. As expressions of sympathy memorial contributions to your favorite charity would be appreciated.

Andrew Samuel Jackson St. Clair

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Andrew St. Clair was born on April 10, 1895 in Aylmer, the son of Alva V. St. Clair (1861-1930) & Mary Edith Pound (1873-1953).  Alva was born in Dorchester township, the son of Andrew J. & Charlotte St. Clair, and was farming there when he was married on September 27, 1893 in Malahide to Mary Pound, of Malahide, daughter of Samuel & Anna Pound.  They are buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin.
Andrew was a farmer living in Malahide when he enlisted for service on May 6, 1918 in London.
He was married in Malahide on February 27, 1924 to Claudia Staley (1902-1961), of Glencolin, daughter of John Gordon Staley & Rachel Whitcroft.
They lived in the Glencolin area for a number of years before retiring to Phoenix, Arizona where Claudia died in 1961. Andrew died on March 22, 1974 in Dayton, Ohio.  He and Claudia are buried in Trinity Cemetery, Glencolin. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 27, 1974:
ANDREW ST. CLAIR
Andrew St. Clair of West Carrolton, Ohio, formerly of Aylmer and London, died in West Carrolton, Ohio, on March 22nd. He was 78 years of age. Born in Aylmer, he was the son of the late Alva and Edith St. Clair.
He is survived by one son, Howard St. Clair and two daughters, Mrs. George (Edith) Tisdale of West Carrolton, Ohio, and Mrs. Daniel (Margaret) Moriarty of London.
Funeral was held at H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home on March 25th, conducted by the Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church. Burial was in Trinity Cemetery.

Harley Stafford

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Harley Stafford was born on October 28, 1895 in Sparta, the son of Cornelius Stafford (1862-1938) & Ella Jane Buston (1869-1946).   Cornelius was born in Yarmouth, the son of Abel & Elizabeth Stafford, and was a farmer in Yarmouth when he was married on November 15, 1890 in St. Thomas to Ellen Buston, also of Yarmouth, the daughter of Christopher & Annie Buston.
Harley was a farmer living in Springfield when he enlisted for service on March 28, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Ella Stafford, of Springfield.
He returned from overseas on December 20, 1918, arriving in Halifax. Following the war, Harley was living at 33 East Street, St. Thomas, working as a cable splicer when he was married there on April 14, 1923 to Ada Lillian Waller (1904-1986), a native of West Ham, England, daughter of Harry Waller & Elizabeth Derrick. She was living at 109 Centre Street, St. Thomas.
Harley was killed in an accident on June 5, 1941 and is buried in St. Thomas cemetery, West Avenue. The inscription on his monument reads as follows:
Father – Harley Stafford Oct. 28, 1895 June 5, 1941 190138 91st Btn C.E.F.
Harley’s widow Ada (Collins) who remarried, is buried in Elmdale cemetery, St. Thomas.
An account of Harley’s death appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 6, 1941:
HARLEY STAFFORD IS KILLED ON HIGHWAY EAST OF CITY
City Works Department Employee Instantly Killed When Automobile Strikes
Bicycle on Which He Was Riding
Harley Stafford, an employee of the works department of the city for the last five years, was almost instantly killed shortly after nine o’clock, Thursday evening, when the bicycle on which he was riding was struck by an automobile driven by Private Anthony G. Kennedy, 22 West Avenue, City, a member of the Three Rivers Tank Corps, at Camp Borden, on No. 3 Highway, about two miles east of the city. The driver of the automobile told the police that he was blinded momentarily by the bright headlights of an approaching car and did not see the bicycle rider virtually until the impact occurred. Private Kennedy, who is home on leave, was motoring to the city from the east.  Morris Landon, R.R. 2 Aylmer, was a passenger in the car.
Mr. Stafford, the accident victim, was also riding his bicycle toward the city. He was on his annual vacation from the city works department and had cycled out into Yarmouth earlier in the evening.  Provincial Traffic Officer Bert Moore, who investigated the accident, expressed the belief that Mr. Stafford’s head struck the corner of the windshield post as his body was thrown over the right front fender of the car. The headlight on the right side of the car was damaged.  High Constable Frank Kelly suggested that the unfortunate man’s head may have struck the sharp visor over the right front headlight.  The visor was bent over.  A sharp hole had been punched through the back of Mr. Stafford’s hat, found near the scene of the accident. A little bunch of hair was in the hole in the hat, indicating that it had been clipped off by some sharp surfaced object like the visor.
First At Scene
Among the first persons to reach the scene of the accident were Sergeant T. Osborne of 11 Antrim street, city, and Joseph P. Holland, both experienced in first aid work.  They took charge until the arrival of the police. The body was removed to the Sifton Funeral Home where identification was established about ten o’clock.  The bicycle on which Mr. Stafford was riding was practically wrecked.
Coroner Dr. D. L. Ewin was notified and ordered an inquest. A post-mortem was performed by Dr. Armstrong, Memorial Hospital pathologist.  The inquest was opened at the Sifton Funeral Home, Friday morning. Adjournment for the hearing of evidence was made until next Tuesday evening in the township hall, Yarmouth Centre, starting at seven o’clock. Death was reported to be due to fracture of the skull.  Members of the coroner’s jury empanelled by Provincial Constable Stuart Hutchinson were William Bodkin, Lloyd N. Herries, Alfred Gloin, John Cook and Granville Gloin, all of the Yarmouth Centre district.  The remains were identified at the preliminary inquest by Edward Meadows, 85 Hiawatha street, a neighbor of the accident victim.
Had Visited His Mother
Harley Stafford was born on the Stafford homestead on No. 3 Highway, east of St. Thomas, on October 28, 1895, and had lived in the city and district most of his life.  He was a veteran of the last Great War, enlisting and going overseas with the 91st Battalion and serving in France for two years and eight months.  Mr. Stafford had cycled to Sparta, Thursday afternoon, to visit his mother, Mrs. Ella Stafford, and was returning to his home in the city when the tragedy occurred. His father, the late Neil Stafford, was well known in the city and Yarmouth.
Mr. Stafford is also survived by his widow, Mrs. Ada Stafford, three sons, Harley Roy, 17, Donald, 12, and Neil, seven, all at 3 Omemee street, city; three brothers, Harvey Stafford, city; Willard Stafford, Brantford; and George Stafford, Sparta; and four sisters, Mrs. Flossie Metcraft, California; Miss Bertha Stafford and Mrs. Harry Brown, city, and Mrs. William Deyell, Sparta.  Mr. Stafford was an adherent of the Hiawatha Street Baptist church. The remains are resting at the Sifton Funeral Home. The funeral service will be held there Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  Interment will be made in the St. Thomas cemetery. Rev. C. D. Savage will conduct the service.
An account of Harley’s funeral appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 9, 1941:
HARLEY STAFFORD
The funeral of Harley Stafford, well-known and highly esteemed resident of this city whose sudden death occurred on Thursday evening as a result of an accident, was held on Saturday afternoon from the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home, and was largely attended. Rev. C . D. Sawyer, of Hiawatha Street Baptist Church, conducted the services. Interment was made in the St. Thomas cemetery. The tribute from the Silver Cross Women of the British Empire was placed on the casket by Mrs. M. A. Knight, Mrs. S. Rankin and Mrs. H. Froome.  The pallbearers were Harvey Pettit, Walter Neville, Sergt. Davies, Sergt. Casey, Quartermaster Sergt. Christie, all members of the 91st Battalion, and James Wilkins.  The members of the Board of Works acted as flower bearers and formed a guard of honor at the home and graveside.  Many beautiful flowers banked and surrounded the casket, including a pillow from wife; wreath “Dad”, from the three sons; spray – neighbors; spray – the 91st Battalion Association; spray – Board of Works Department and Park Department; spray – Elgin Handles; spray – officers and staff, Fingal; spray – teachers and pupils of Grade 2 and 5, Scott Street school; and many other lovely designs from relatives, friends and neighbors. In attendance from a distance were Mr and Mrs Willard Stafford, Brantford; Mr and Mrs William Deyell and George Stafford, Sparta; and many others from Jaffa, Sparta, Aylmer, city and vicinity.

Thomas Linden Stafford

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Linden Stafford was born on September 1, 1878 in Port Burwell, the son of Capt. Thomas Stafford (1851-1889) & Mary Jane Fay (1856-1933). Thomas was a native of Ireland, and was a mariner living in Port Burwell when he was married at Trinity Anglican Church there on September 15, 1875 to Mary Jane Fay, of Port Burwell, the daughter of John Fay & Emma Appleton.  Thomas drowned off the schooner Erie Wave, and is buried in Trinity Cemetery, Port Burwell.   Mary and her children moved to the United States, where they are found on the 1900 census in Crystal City, Pembina County, North Dakota. It appears she had returned to Port Burwell by 1915 since Linden names her as his next of kin at that location. By 1930, she was living at 926 Harriet Street, Monterey, California.  She died in 1933 and is buried in California, although her name appears on a monument in Trinity Cemetery, Port Burwell.
Linden was living in Delisle, Saskatchewan prior to 1910 but by 1915 appears to be living in Victoria, British Columbia, where he enlisted for service on September 1, 1915.  His occupation is given as locomotive fireman.  He was not married.
Linden returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on July 8.  He was discharged due to chronic bronchitis.  His address on the passenger list is Victoria, B.C.
Linden died in Hazelton, British Columbia on July 12, 1937 at the age of 58. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 29, 1937:
LINDEN STAFFORD C.N.R. ENGINEER PASSES
The residents of Port Burwell sadly learned the news of the sudden death of Mr. Linden Stafford, nephew of Mrs. Elizabeth Stafford, of this place, from a heart attack, in his 59th year.  He was the son of the late Captain Thomas Stafford, who lost his life while master of the ill-fated sailing schooner, “Erie Wave”, when it went aground in 1897. Linden Stafford was born and spent his boyhood days here, but had lived in the West after his father’s death.
He served overseas in the Great War with a Scottish regiment, and after being wounded twice, and gassed at Mons, he was sent home. He was engaged as an engineer on the C.N.R., and it was during his daily run that he was taken suddenly ill and passed away.
Surviving are one brother, Fred, of Kent, Washington; one sister, Edna, of California; one aunt, Mrs. Elizabeth Drake, and F. W. Fay, and Mrs. Thomas Raison, of Port Burwell. The funeral was held on July 13th from the home of his brother, Fred, in Kent, Washington, U.S.A.

Percy Edward Staib

797219  Percy Staib
Percy Staib was born on May 1, 1895 in Fort Erie, the son of George E. Staib & Latitia Bridges. George was born in Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, the son of Frederick & Mary Magdalene Staib, and was living there when he was married on January 3, 1893 in Delhi to Latitia Brydges, a Windham Township native living in Lyndoch, the daughter of Stephen & Emily Bridges.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Charlotteville Township, and on the 1911 census in Malahide.  George & Latitia are buried in St. John’s Anglican cemetery, Bertie Township, Welland County.
Percy was a farmer living at Lyndoch in Norfolk County with his father when he enlisted for service on June 3, 1916 in Simcoe.  He had served in the 30th Battery in Aylmer, and belonged to the 39th Regiment.  He enlisted with the 133rd O.S. Battalion.
He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Quebec on July 11. Following the war, Percy was living at lot 30, concession 2, Malahide, and was married on August 22, 1923 to Edna Tuff, daughter of John Tuff of Aylmer.
Percy died on July 27, 1967 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  A military marker there bears the following inscription: Percy E. Staib   Private  133 Battn CEF  27 July 1967 age 72
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 2, 1967:
PERCY E. STAIB
London, Ont. – Percy E. Staib, who resided at 219 Grand Avenue, London, died on Thursday, July 27, in Westminster Hospital, London. Mr. Staib was in his 73rd year.  He is survived by his wife, the former Edna Tuff, and by two children, daughter Mrs. Glenn (Dorothy) Keene of Stratford; and a son, Douglas Staib, of Toronto.  A sister, Mrs. Jessie (Edna) Kline, Union, and a brother Irvine Staib of Crystal Beach, also survive, as do four grandchildren.  Rested at the Ridout St. Chapel of A. Millard George Funeral Home, London, where the service was held in the chapel on Saturday afternoon with Rev. F. A. Gilbert of Westminster Hospital officiating.  Interment was in Aylmer Cemetery.

Charles Herbert Stamp

84249  Herbert Stamp
The Aylmer Express of October 12, 1916 reported that C. H. Stamp, formerly of Aylmer, had been wounded.
Charles Herbert Stamp was born on September 14, 1893 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, the son of Charles & Mary A. Stamp.  The family is found on the 1901 census living at 64 Lower Adelaide, Kingthorpe, Northamptonshire, England.
Herbert emigrated to Canada at the age of 19, leaving Southampton on the ship Ascania and arriving at Portland, Maine on April 13, 1913.  His occupation in England had been a boot packer, and his intended occupation in Canada was a farm hand. He appears to have settled in the Aylmer area. When he enlisted for service on March 4, 1915 in Guelph, his attestation paper had been signed by Lt. Clarke of the 30th Battery in Aylmer on February 27.  Charles’ address is not given on his attestation paper.  He was a farmer, not married, and names his next of kin as his mother Mrs. M. A. Stamp, of 64 Adelaide Street, Northampton, England.  He had served 3 years in the East Midland Brigade in England.
A letter was printed in the Aylmer Express, October 12, 1916 reporting that Charles had been wounded:
DRIVER C. H. STAMP, A FORMER AYLMER MAN IS WOUNDED
An Interesting Sketch by Mr. George Mather, Who Was a Great Friend of Driver Stamp
The Editor Aylmer Express:
Dear Sir –
May I by your kindness draw the attention of some of your readers at least, to a notice appearing in the London Free Press. It read thus: “Wounded – Driver C. H. Stamp”.
Charles Herbert Stamp lived here in Aylmer, working for Mr. John Trim and Mr. Murray Summers and proved a faithful and reliable helper for some years to both these well known local farmers.  He was confirmed in the Church of England in the Old Country and together we have attended services in our little branch of the Mother church right here in Aylmer.  He has a brother, who is himself a clerk in Holy Orders in England.  He has also a widowed mother, I believe, who has written most grateful letters to the good wives of the employers here for the many acts of kindness shown to her son whilst he was a stranger in a strange land.
It seems a comparatively short time since he and another Englishman who was a fellow worker with Bert Stamp and myself (I refer to Ernest Higginbottom, since enlisted and now ‘Somewhere in France’). I repeat since we three spent part of Stamp’s last leave together at the home of Mr. John Caron, Dingle St., and on reflection I am convinced that it was the personal example of our wounded friend that induced his companion to also prove the sincerity of his patriotism in such a practical way.
Apart from that brief and somewhat curt notice in the Press, we know nothing; but I felt, Sir, that I would be doing nothing amiss to make some record of our sympathy for him and those of his folk whose intense appreciation of Canadian women’s hospitality and forethought is beyond doubt worthy of the children of the Motherland.
May I, in conclusion, add too, that our friend was most unassuming and even as I write I feel that I may be stepping in where angels fear to tread, but for the work of such boys, who risk their lives for us, it is a poor return of gratitude, if we wait until they are dead to extol their noble sacrifices and store up their virtues in the vagaries of a doubtful memory.
‘Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget, lest we forget’.
Yours faithfully, George Mather
A letter from Bert was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 7, 1916:
Canadian Base Depot, London, Nov. 10, 1916
Dear Mrs. Trim –
I guess by this time you will have thought I were dead, but am pleased to say I am very much alive just at present. By now you will have received my card stating that I had been wounded but am doing all right again. I got a piece of shrapnel shell through the thick part of my right arm.
How are things coming over there?  I guess there are not many young men left now but what are in khaki, but still, I am afraid we are going to need them all as it does not look like being over this year, but I can tell you I won’t be sorry when it is over as I have seen just about al I want to see.
How is Will Bates getting along, and C. Learn, as I haven’t heard anything about them for a long time. Ernie Higginbottom came out you know, and B. Benson spoke to him. I was on the lookout for him but did not see him and it was soon after that that I was wounded and don’t know what battalion he is with now, as he came out with a draft, so if you have his address would you kindly send it along when you write again. By the way, I had a letter from George Mathers a short time ago and I see that he is back with John Caron again. He said it had been reported in the local papers about me, but I can tell you I am thinking I was a very lucky fellow to get away as easy as I did. The only thing was, I did not get to Blighty with it, as I would very much liked to have done. Fourteen months out here now and I have not had a leave yet, but still I guess if I wait long enough I will get one.
Well, I don’t think there is anything more I can tell you this time. Hoping this will find all at home in the best of health as this leaves me fine at present. Kindly remember me to Kenneth, Jack and Evelyn, and all the folks and receive my best wishes yourself,
I remain, yours sincerely, “Bert” Stamp
A photo of Herbert with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Gr. C. Herbert Stamp was born in England and came to this section about four years ago. When the call came for men he enlisted with the 16th Battery. He received slight wounds last October but is now doing duty again”
Herbert returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in St. Johns, Newfoundland on March 6. A photograph, with the following caption, appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 3, 1919:
“GR. C. Herbert Stamp, who has been spending a week with his former employer, Murray Summers, 8th Con. Malahide. He just returned from overseas after many months of service in France, and has received his discharge. He expects to leave on Friday for the West where he will locate.”
No further information is known.

Jack Stanton

53739  Jack Stanton
Jack Stanton  was born on April 4, 1893 in Brighton, England. He enlisted for service on October 24, 1914 in St. Thomas. He had one year training in the 25th Regiment. He names his next of kin as his sister,  Mrs. Mary Challoner[?], of 6 Buckingham Square, Arkona [?] St., Liverpool. He gives his occupation as a pipe coverer.
He served as a Sergeant in the 18th Battalion in England and France, being in battles at Ypres, St. Eloi, Hill 60 and the Somme.  He was discharged in May 1919.
A marriage record was found for Jack Stanton, of London, a plumber, born in Kingsville, Ontario, son of William Stanton & Mary Shaw.  He was a Private in the 18th Battalion in the 2nd Overseas Contingent. He married Daisy Precoor (1896-1965) of Aylmer, daughter of Frank Precoor & May Burdick, on March 1, 1915 in St. Thomas.
 Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, March 14, 1915:
On March 1, at Trinity rectory, St. Thomas, Ven. Archdeacon Hill, Honorary Major of the 25th Regiment, solemnized holy matrimony between Private Jack Stanton, 18th Battalion Second Overseas contingent, Kingsville, Essex County, and Miss Daisy May Precoor, of Aylmer. Their many friends wish success, health and immunity from danger to this brave young soldier of the king, and a happy return to the girl he leaves behind him, when the war is over.  The bride is a daughter of Mr and Mrs Frank Precoor, South street west.
Jack was wounded in 1916 as reported in the St. Thomas Journal, October 3, 1916:
PTE. J. STANTON OF AYLMER HAS SHELL SHOCK
Mrs. Daisy Stanton Gets Word That Her Husband is in Hospital
Aylmer, Oct. 3 – Mrs. Daisy Stanton, of Aylmer, received the sad news yesterday from Ottawa that her husband, Pte. Jack Stanton, of the 18th Battalion, was admitted to No. 2 General Hospital at Boulogne, France, suffering from a shell shock received Sept. 20. More particulars will follow when received.
A photo of Jack with the following caption, was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Pte. Jack Stanton was born in Kingsville 23 years ago. H e enlisted with the 18th Batt., and has been in France for some months. Pte. Stanton received a slight wound a few months ago. His wife is the daughter of Mr and Mrs F. Procure”.
Jack died on March 26, 1947 in his 54th year and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with a military marker bearing the following inscription: (his wife Daisy is buried beside him)
A-9391 Corporal Jack Stanton, R.C.A.S.C. 26th March 1947. The Lord is My Shepherd”
The Veteran’s Affairs of Canada database contains information about Jack’s service in World War II.  His service number is given as A/9391, and states that he served with the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. He is listed as a son of Joseph & Mary Stanton, and husband of Daisy.
Jack’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 10, 1947:
VETERAN PASSES IN LONDON
Mr. Jack Stanton, 95 Myrtle street, Aylmer, passed away in the Westminster Hospital, London, on Mar. 26th, following a lengthy illness.  Born in New York State on April 11th 1895, the deceased was in his 54th year.  Prior to enlisting in the Veterans Guard Service Corps in 1939, Mr. Stanton was employed by the New York Central Railway. During the First World War, he was a sergeant in the Canadian Army. He was a member of the Canadian Legion, Branch 81, Aylmer.  With his family he had made his home in Aylmer for the past six years having resided in Springfield for sometime previous to that.  Surviving are his wife, the former Daisy Precoor; one son, Gordon Precoor; and three daughters, Daisy Stanton, at home; Mrs. Lillian Wall, St. Thomas, and Mrs. Keith Brown, Chatham. There is one grandson, Donald Brown, of Chatham.  A private service was held from his late residence, Myrtle Street, on Saturday, March 29th, with Rev. G. Turnbull of the Aylmer Gospel Chapel in charge, assisted by Rev. F. C. McRitchie of Trinity Church. Interment in the Aylmer cemetery.

Walter Earl Steele

339910
Walter Steele was born on May 25, 1892 in Aylmer, the son of Arthur Edward Steele (1870-1928) & Elizabeth Davenport (1871-1951).  Arthur was born at Cheapside in Haldimand County, the son of Edward Steele & Frances Cook, and was a tailor living in Aylmer when he was married there on July 15, 1891 to Lizzie Davenport, of Aylmer, daughter of Charles Davenport & Drusilla Jane Pressey.  Arthur & Lizzie are buried in Delhi Cemetery.
Walter was employed as a bank clerk in Delhi living with his parents when he enlisted for service on June 19, 1916 in Toronto.  He enlisted with the 69th Battery.
Following the war, Walter was living in Hamilton when he was married on July 18, 1923 in Simcoe to Gladys May Ramey of Simcoe, daughter of Emerson Ramey & Adelaide Green.
Walter died on January 13, 1941 and is buried in Delhi cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Simcoe Reformer, January 16, 1941:
WALTER EARL STEELE
The death occurred on Monday evening, suddenly, of Walter Earl Steele, son of Mrs. A. E. Steele and the late Mr. Steele, Delhi. Mr. Steele for 17 years owned and operated the Delta Battery Service in Hamilton after conducting the Willard Battery Service of Simcoe for two years.
While in Simcoe he met and married the former Miss Gladys Ramey, younger daughter of the late Mr. Emerson Ramey.  Prior to his establishment in business in Simcoe, Mr. Steele served nearly four years overseas during the World War, having been a gunner in the 69th Battery of the Canadian Artillery. He was badly gassed and shell-shocked during his service in France. After being sent home from an English hospital he convalesced about one year before entering business. Before going overseas deceased was a banker for eight years with the old Bank of Hamilton, which later became merged with the Canadian Bank of Commerce.
Mr. Steele was a devout Anglican and was a member of the Board of Management of Trinity Anglican Church, Simcoe. He was also a member of Murton Lodge of Perfection, a Sovereign of Rose Croix and also a member of Acacia Lodge No. 61 A.F. & A.M. Hamilton. He was a 32nd Degree Mason. Deceased also held membership in the Overseas Artillery Club, Hamilton, and was a shareholder of Norfolk Golf and Country Club Limited.
He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, and two children, daughter Doris Adelaide Elizabeth Steele and Earle Edward Ramey at home; his mother, Mrs. A. E. Steele, Delhi, and one brother, Mr. Evan E. Steele, Toronto, also survive.
The funeral is taking place this afternoon Thursday, at 2:30 o’clock from his late residence, 14 Talbot Street South, with interment being made in the Delhi cemetery. The active pallbearers are Cecil Perry, John Harris and I.D. Smith, all of Hamilton; Charles H. Martin, A. D. Trebilcock and John Anguish, all of Simcoe. Honorary bearers are D. F. Aiken and J. C. Kayser, Simcoe; W. E. Sutherland and Albert Wilbur, Delhi; A Moore, Hamilton, and Bruce Drake, Galt.  The clergy in charge of the last rites are Rev. W. E. V. McMillen, Rector of Trinity, Simcoe, and Rev. W. G. Sunter, Hamilton, Rector of the Hamilton church of which Mr. Steele was a member.

George William Steers

189721
George Steers was born on January 3, 1868 in Berkshire, England.  He was married to Harriet Cook (1878-1926) in 1902 in London, England, and emigrated to Canada about 1909, settling in Malahide Township where they appear on the 1911 census.  George’s name cannot be found on a passenger list, but his wife Harriet and son Fred sailed from Liverpool on the ship Corsican, arriving in Quebec on October 15, 1909. Their destination was Elgin.  George had no doubt arrived in Canada first to establish a home before sending for his family to join him.
George was a labourer living in Vienna with is wife and three children when he enlisted for service in St. Thomas on December 28, 1915 with the 91st Battalion.  He gives his date of birth as January 3, 1873. He had served four and a half years with the 16th Middlesex V.B. in England, and three months with the Home Guards in Port Burwell.
George died in 1954 and is buried with his wife in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.  The monument gives his date of birth as 1868.
George & Harriet had three children: Frederick (born 1908 in England); Norman Frank (born 1910 in Ontario; died 1957); and George Edward (1913-1988).

Harry Vernon Stephens

210898
Harry Vernon Stephens was born on July 31, 1898 in Niagara Falls, the son of Harry P. Stephens & May E. Cole.  He enlisted for service in the 98th Battalion on October 25, 1915 in Welland.  He had served one month in the 44th Regiment.
Mr. Stephens was married on October 3, 1936 to Aleta Ethel Newton, who was born on June 2, 1903 in South Dorchester Township, the daughter of David F. Newton & Jenette Martin.  The Newtons later lived in Aylmer.  Following their marriage, Harry Vernon & Aleta moved to Niagara Falls and later Toronto.
H. V. Stephens died on August 14, 1975 in Toronto. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 3, 1975:
MAJOR H. V. STEPHENS, M.B.E.
Major Harry Vernon Stephens, 77, former Niagara Falls resident and member of the British Empire, died in Toronto on Thursday, August 14th. Major Stephens was born in Niagara Falls where he attended Simcoe Street Public School and Niagara Falls Collegiate. He later attended the Law School of Upper Canada, Toronto.  He was the son of Harry Punshon Stephens, a former mayor of Niagara Falls and newspaper publisher.
Major Stephens was appointed manager of the Ontario government savings bank and worked in the brokerage business in Niagara Falls for several years. He served as a member of Niagara Falls Board of Education.
In the militia, he started as a bugler in the former 44th Regiment of Welland in 1911. He joined the 4th Battalion the day after war was declared in 1914 and served at Beaverdams, as he was then too young for overseas service. In 1915 he joined the 98th Battalion from Welland and went overseas with the 31st Battalion.
He took part in the battle of Vimy Ridge, where he received minor injuries. He was seriously wounded in the legs at the Battle of Fresnoy, May 3, 1917.
In 1939, he rejoined the army and served as assistant quarter-master general at military headquarters, Toronto. For his work in the Second World War, he was named Member of the British Empire by the King.
Major Stephens moved to Toronto in 1944. After the war, he worked there as a real estate broker, retiring in 1964.
He is survived by his wife, the former Aleta Newton of Aylmer; two daughters, Mrs. R. J. (Judy) Trippitt of Birmingham, Michigan and Mrs. William (Marilyn) Scott of Toronto; one son, Paul Stephens of Toronto; two sisters, Mrs. Hugh (Edith) Ewart of Niagara Falls, N.Y., and Mrs. V. (Marion) Russell of Youngstown, N.Y., and four grandsons, Stephen, David and Barry Trippitt and Andrew Scott.
Two brothers, Stewart Stephens and William Stephens and one sister, Norma Brown, died previously. Funeral was held in Toronto on Saturday, August 16th. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery.

William Guy Stewardson

3310239
Guy Stewardson was born on December 14, 1892 in Dereham Township, Oxford County, the son of William Hodson Stewardson (1855-1932) & Alice Cowan (born 1863).  William was born in Walpole Township, Haldimand County, the son of William & Jane Stewardson, and was living in Brownsville when he was married on March 9, 1892 in Walpole to Alice Cowan, of Walpole, daughter of James Cowan.  The family is found on the 1901 census in Windham Township, Norfolk County, but by the 1911 census had moved to Bayham, where William was a farmer. William & Alice were living in Waterford by 1918, and are buried in Greenwood Cemetery there.
Guy was living in Brantford working as a farmer when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1918 in Brantford.  Presumably during his training, he developed lobar pneumonia and was admitted to Spadina Military Hospital in Toronto where he died on April 13, 1918 at the age of 25.  He is buried with his parents in Greenwood Cemetery, Waterford. His name appears on an honor roll at the Richmond United Church in Bayham Township.

Alexander Selkirk Stilwell

189494
Alexander Selkirk Stilwell was born on October 23, 1879 [or 1883] at Calton in Bayham township, the son of James Stilwell & Ellen Bartlett.  James was born in Middleton Township, Norfolk County, the son of John & Mary Stilwell, and was a cheesemaker living in Bayham when he was married on October 4, 1877 at Straffordville to Ellen Bartlett, of Bayham, the daughter of Porter & Rebecca Bartlett.
Selkirk Stilwell was farming at Vienna when he was married on March 2, 1907 in St. Thomas to Irene Blanche Keillor (1877-1962), of Iona, the daughter of Elijah Keillor & Louisa Bossence.
They moved to Iona where he was employed as a farm labourer when he enlisted with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas on November 25, 1915. He returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 20.
He was living at 222 Ross Street, St. Thomas working as a teamster when he died on October 14, 1933 at Westminster Hospital London, from pneumonia.  He is buried in South Park Cemetery, St. Thomas.
His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, October 14, 1933:
WOUNDED AND GASSED IN WAR, 91ST VETERAN DIES IN LONDON
Alexander Selkirk Stilwell Passes Away Saturday in Westminster Hospital
To Be Buried Here
Veteran of the Great War and former member of the 91st Battalion, Alexander Selkirk Stilwell died Saturday morning in the Westminster Military Hospital, London, Ont.  Mr. Stilwell, wounded and gassed during his war services in France, had been ill ever since his return from overseas.
Mr. Stilwell was born at Vienna, Ontario, 51 years ago, and had lived there and at Langton and in St. Thomas. In the 91st Battalion with which he went overseas, he was a member of “C” Company. He was a member of the Canadian Legion, London branch, and an adherent of the United Church.
Surviving him are his wife, formerly Irene Keillor, residing at 198 Elgin street, London; two sons, Elwood and Stewart, and a daughter, Miss Golden, at home; a brother, Gordon Stilwell, Langton, and a sister, Mrs. Harry Norton, 222 Ross Street, St. Thomas.
The remains have been brought to the Sifton Funeral Home, Wellington Street, and the funeral will take place from there on Monday at 2 o’clock, with interment in the Soldiers’ plot in South Park Cemetery. Rev. W. Raithby will be in charge.

Frank Stewart Stirton

3133801  Stewart Stirton
Stewart Stirton was born on July 5, 1895 in South Dorchester, the son of David Stirton (1860-1937) and Esther Margaret Nesbitt (1859-1899).  David was born in Bruce County, the son of John Stirton & Esther Ellis, and was living in Malahide when he was married on April 14, 1886 in South Dorchester to Esther Nesbitt, a resident and native of South Dorchester. David & Esther are buried in Springfield cemetery.
Stewart was employed as a fireman on the railroad and living at 39 Flora Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on May 9, 1918 in St. Thomas.
He returned to his employment as a fireman and was still living at 39 Flora Street when he was married on June 21, 1922 to Carrie Irene Little (1901-1983), a native of West Lorne, living at 26 Inkerman Street, St. Thomas. Carrie was the daughter of Frank Little & Carrie Ripley.
Stewart died on February 14, 1979 and is buried with his wife in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, February 16, 1979:
F. STEWART STIRTON
F. Stewart Stirton, 55 Malakoff Street, St. Thomas, passed away suddenly at his late residence, Feb. 14, in his 84th year.  Born in Springfield, July 5, 1895, son of the late David and Esther (Nesbitt) Stirton, he resided all his life in this area.
Mr. Stirton was a member of Grace United Church, and a member of St. David’s Masonic Lodge, No. 302, and the Firemen and Engineers Lodge.  He was a retired conductor from the New York Central Railway.
Surviving are his wife, the former Irene Little; one daughter, Mrs. Donald (Shirley) North, of 53 Malakoff Street, and one granddaughter and a great grandson. Two sisters passed away previously. Mr. Stirton was the last surviving member of his family.
Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, where Rev. W. P. Smetheram of Grace United Church will conduct the funeral service, Monday at 1:30 p.m. Visitation will begin Saturday afternoon. Interment will be made in Elmdale Memorial Park Cemetery.

William Charles Stokes

401695
Charles Stokes’ name  is found in a list of men from Jaffa serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, December 14, 1916. He is described as “of the 33rd Battalion, now working in a hospital in England”.
Charles Stokes was born in Birmingham, Warwickshire, England on November 24, 1868, the son of Charles W. & Elizabeth Stokes. He emigrated to Canada about 1881 and was a labourer living in Jaffa when he was married on May 27, 1893 in Sparta to Anna Louisa Roberts (1876-1959), of Copenhagen, the daughter of Robert Roberts & Mary Elizabeth Robbins.  Charles & Anna later moved to St. Thomas where they appear on the 1901 census, but returned to Malahide where they are found on the 1911 census. They lived on the Jamestown road near Copenhagen, on lot 9, concession 2, and later on lot 5, concession 5. Their children were: William Frederick, Daisy, Henry Wallace, Raymond Charles, Lloyd Roland, Arthur Robert & Rosemary.
Charles was living near Jaffa when he enlisted for service on September 28, 1915 in St. Thomas.  His attestation paper states he was transferred from the 70th Battalion to the 33rd Battalion on October 28, 1915.  He gives his date of birth as November 24, 1870.  His service number on the attestation paper is 401695, yet the National Archives of Canada gives the number as 491160 in their index.
A letter from Charles was published in the Aylmer Express, February 1, 1917:
A LETTER FROM PTE. STOKES
Mrs. W. C. Stokes, Jaffa, has received the following letter from her husband, who is in England, doing his “bit”. It clearly points out wherein lies their strength in their time of separation.
“I received your letter dated Dec. 20th. I was so glad to get it, for you do not know how I wait and long to hear from you all. There must have been some of your letters gone astray but you know we cannot help that. I try to write twice a week, but sometimes some duty calls me so I cannot, but you may depend upon it, I write when I can. I thank you for sending those verses. I think you and I have been trying to live them out, although we have come far short of what has been our privilege. I think that according to our circumstances and surroundings, we have done very well, but let us this year count our blessings of the past year and strive harder by the help of God to do a lot better and trust more fully in Him. I have tried harder this last year to be an example, although I have been tempted in so many different ways, but the Lord has given me the power to say no. I know too, that you have had your share of trials, and if the Lord spares us to meet once more in our own home, we can tell each other our troubles and trials, and all our experiences and look back on them and say, ‘The Lord has been very gracious to us’. The time may not be very long, but we do not know. I am very well and hope you are all well. Remember me to all our friends.
I suppose you have not heard if G. Parnell got home yet. I haven’t heard from H. Eley since he told me he got the tobacco. I wrote him since I came here. I must now close, and may the Lord bless you all.Charlie
Pte. W. C. Stokes, 401695, Garrison Duty Depot, 52 St. Helen’s Road, Hastings, England
Charles returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in Halifax on July 21.
Charles died on January 21, 1968 at the age of 99, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 24, 1968:
WILLIAM C. STOKES
Ill for a short time, William Charles Stokes, formerly of Aylmer, died in Westminster Hospital at London on Sunday.  He was 99.  Mr. Stokes was born in England and came to Canada 80 years ago and made his home in the Aylmer area since that time, being a general farmer. He served with the Army in World War I. His wife, the former Annie Roberts died nine years ago.
Surviving are three sons, Henry of Shedden; Raymond of Ypsilanti, Mich.; Arthur of London; two daughters, Mrs. Neil (Daisy) Doolittle of Aylmer; and Mrs. Howard (Rose Mary) Walker, of London; 15 grandchildren, 33 great grandchildren and four great great grandchildren, and a niece, Mrs. Willow Catt of R.R. 3, St. Thomas.  The Rev. Fred Jillard of Aylmer Baptist Church conducted the service at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home this (Wednesday) afternoon. Burial was in Aylmer Cemetery.

William Frederick Stokes

3130096  William Frederick Stokes
William Stokes was born on August 20, 1896 in Malahide, the son of William Charles Stokes (1868-1968) & Annie Louisa Roberts (1876-1959).  William Charles Stokes was born in Birmingham, England, the son of Charles W. & Elizabeth Stokes, and was a labourer living at Jaffa when he was married on May 27, 1893 in Sparta to Annie Roberts, of Copenhagen, daughter of Robert & Elizabeth Roberts.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
William was a farmer living with his parents at R.R. #5 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 28, 1917 in London.
A letter from William appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 13, 1919.  His photograph with the following caption was printed on the front page:
“Cpl. W. F. Stokes, a Jaffa boy now with the Canadian forces in Siberia. He went to Russia on the same boat with Roy Morse [sic- should be Morris], Earl Wilkinson and Will Hemstreet, all of Aylmer. An interesting letter from Cpl. Stokes appears in another column of this issue”.
The letter is as follows:
CANADIANS IN SIBERIA
Cpl. W. F. Stokes writes his mother at Jaffa, of his experiences crossing the Pacific and his impressions of Russia
Victoria, B.C., Thursday 26, 1919
Dear Mother –
Just a few lines to say that I am well as usual and having the time of my life. Perhaps you will be a bit surprised, but we are on the boat.  It is a freighter fitted as a troop ship, but I don’t know the name of it. I thought I would try to send a line from here so that you wouldn’t wonder why I wasn’t writing. Well, mother, I was not B.O.S. as I expected when I wrote last but I spent Christmas on guard instead. I had a very good time too. About six o’clock at night they came and told me to take off my guard, so I went to the show for the evening, which was free to soldiers and their friends. No civilians were allowed except friends of soldiers who went. The show was a lay called “All-of-a-sudden Peggy”.  It sure was good.
Reveille was at 5:30 this morning. We left camp at 11:45 and were well on board by three o’clock. I understand that we don’t sail until tomorrow. I have had a splendid time during my stay at Victoria. I hope you all had a good time at Christmas and New Years. I guess you will get this after New Years.
I expect it will be some time before you get any more mail now. There are about two thousand of us on this boat, at least that is what I was told.
Tuesday, 14-1-19
Well, mother, we left about five o’clock on the 26th of December and now we are in sight of Siberia. We will land tomorrow morning in Vladivostok. We have had a splendid trip. The boat left before I could mail this so suppose you will think that I am really neglecting you, as it will be sometime in February before you get this. It was a long trip as we were 16 days without sight of land. I was only sick about three days and then not bad for I was up on deck every day. I only missed four meals during the trip, so you see it was nothing serious. Will Hemstreet, Roy Morris and young Rollie are on this boat. The name of the boat is the “Protesilians”. She is [illegible] and a very strong boat made in Liverpool. We are now over seven thousand miles from home. We all received a pair of splendid woolen socks from the Daughters of the Empire at Victoria, so our feet will be warm, and you should see the clothes we are getting. Just imagine, today the first real cold day I have seen since we left home and it isn’t below zero. We got a wireless that it is 13 degrees below at Vladivostok but that isn’t too bad. We saw quite a number of whales on Saturday, and yesterday a seal, playing not far from the rocky land. I suppose that you have plenty of snow over there now. We came through a very heavy storm about a week ago and lost one of our propellers so really our trip has not been without experience. I will never forget those waves, one moment we seemed to be on the crest of mountains and the next in the deepest valleys. We were not kept below and the boys had their cameras taking pictures of the waves. The dishes slid from one end of the table to the other and from one end of the boat to the other and a happier bunch of fellows were never heard tell of. The harder the boat tossed, the better time they had. Well so long for this time, will write soon, from you loving son, Willie.
William died on March 1, 1920 in Malahide at the age of 23 from appendicitis.  He is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his parents.  The inscription on the monument bears the following verse:
“A sunbeam straight from God”.
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 4, 1920:
The funeral took place on Wednesday at 1:30 of William Frederick Stokes, son of Mr and Mrs W. C. Stokes of South Yarmouth, to the Aylmer cemetery. The death occurred on Monday last. Deceased, who was in his 24th year, was a very willing worker in the church and had just prior to his death been elected superintendent of the Jaffa Baptist Sunday School. During the war he was granted exemption from the fact that his father was overseas. The father was returned and immediately the young man waived all rights to exemption and went with the Siberian Expedition.  Previous to going overseas he acted as sergeant instructor at the barracks in London where his example of young Christian manhood was followed by many an older man than himself.  Deceased leaves to mourn his untimely death beside his parents, before mentioned, four younger brothers, Lloyd, Raymond, Harold and Arthur, and one sister, Mrs. Neil Doolittle, of Luton.

George Colin Stover

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The name “Colin Stover” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Springfield.
Colin Stover was born on May 8, 1897 at lot 12, concession 11 Dereham Township, Oxford County, the son of Lyman Davis Stover (1865-1927) & Elizabeth Johnston (1863-1941).  Lyman was born in South Dorchester Township, the son of Jesse Stover & Mary Ann Corless, and was living there when he was married on April 19, 1889 in Lyons to Elizabeth Johnston, of South Dorchester, the daughter of Thomas & Margaret Johnston.  Lyman, Elizabeth & Colin are found on the 1901 census in Springfield, but by 1911 had moved to Southwold Township.  They returned to South Dorchester, however, where they lived at lot 5, concession 7 near Avon for a number of years.  Lyman & Elizabeth are buried in Dorchester Union Cemetery, Dorchester.
Although no attestation paper can be found for Colin, the Book of Remembrance states he enlisted for service in May 1917 and served in the Royal Air Force in France. He was discharged in January 1919.
Following the war, he moved to Dearborn, Michigan about 1924 where he is found on the 1930 census working as a pattern maker in an auto plant.  His widowed mother is living with him.  He was married on August 23, 1930 to Gladys Murray Snetsinger of Nissouri Township near Thamesford.
He died on June 24, 1987 in Dearborn, Michigan.

James Lee Stratton

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James Stratton was born on January 29, 1891 at Straffordville, the son of Moses Stratton (1843-1942) & Athelia Herries (1855-1922).  Moses was the son of Henry & Elizabeth Stratton, and was a widower living in Bayham when he was married on December 30, 1879 in Walsingham Township to Athelia Herries, also of Bayham, the daughter of James & Mary Herries. They are buried in Straffordville cemetery.
James was employed as a butter maker when he enlisted for service on September 23, 1914 at Valcartier.  He had served two years in the 29th Grey’s Horse in Ingersoll, and three years in the 39th Infantry in Simcoe.  He belonged to the 11th Battery, C.F.A. in Guelph.  His residence is not given, but was probably in the Guelph area.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on May 7.
Following the war, James moved to Toronto where he was living at the Central Y.M.C.A., employed as an assistant manager.  He was married in Toronto on July 27, 1922 to Norma Jean Soper (1896-1979) of Straffordville, the daughter of James Ernest Soper & Margaret Elizabeth Stratton.
James later moved to R.R. #1 Owen Sound, where died on July 14,1969. He is buried with his wife in Straffordville cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, July 16, 1969:
JAMES LEE STRATTON
James Lee Stratton of R.R. #1 Owen Sound, died on Monday, July 14, at General and Marine Hospital, Owen Sound, in his 79th year. Mr. Stratton was formerly of Straffordville.  Surviving are his wife, Norma Soper Stratton; one daughter, Mrs. Keith (June) Barber of Thornhill; sisters, Miss Victoria Stratton of St. Thomas; Mrs. R. J. (Ida) Eley of Kellifer, Sask.; and Mrs. Lewis (Edna) Garnham of Straffordville, and two grandchildren
He was predeceased by one son, John, and two brothers and three sisters. Resting at the Barrie Armstrong Funeral Home for service in the chapel, July 11, at 2 p.m. Interment in Straffordville Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Toronto Sick Children’s Hospital would be appreciated.

Kenneth Verne Stratton

The name “Lieut. Kenneth Stratton”  is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.
Kenneth Verne Stratton was born on May 3, 1896 in Delhi, the son of Henry Leon Stratton (1867-1944) & Edith Gertrude Phillips (1871-1960).  Henry was born in Bayham, the son of Moses & Sarah Stratton, and was a clerk living in Straffordville when he was married there on December 18, 1889 to Edith Phillips, also a native of Bayham living in Straffordville, the daughter of Joseph & Thurza Phillips.  Henry became a dry goods merchant and moved to Delhi where the family is found on the 1901 census.  In 1911, he purchased a grocery store in Aylmer from R. G. Moore, and in 1915 along with Edward Martin, purchased “Farthing’s Big Store” in Aylmer.  Henry & Edith are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Kenneth enlisted for service in England about 1915, and was a Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Royal Air Force.  He received a medal for his service.  He returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Portland, Maine on March 24. An article in the Aylmer Express, March 28, 1918, tells of his return:
FLIGHT SUB-LIEUT. K. V. STRATTON IS HOME
Flight Sub-Lieut. K. V. Stratton, of the Royal Flying Corps, arrived home from France and England Tuesday night. He phoned his parents, Mr and Mrs H. L. Stratton Tuesday morning from Toronto, and this was the first intimation they had that he was in Canada, as they expected he was still in a convalsecent hospital in England, where he was being treated for nervous troubles.
Lieut. Stratton, while a student in Toronto University, joined the Imperial forces about three years ago, and after training in England was transferred to the Flying corps and attached to the navy. More than a year ago he was sent to France and has since been continually on active service there with the air men, until a few weeks ago when he was sent to England on account of his nerves. After long service in the air, men must have a rest, and it was welcome news to Lieut. Stratton when he was ordered home to Canada to rest. He expects to visit his parents here for a couple of weeks before returning to England to report for duty again.
He has had many exciting experiences, and just before being sent to England had a very narrow escape from capture. He says that practically all the air fighting is done over the German lines, the German air men are very seldom venturing over the Allied lines. He had been engaged in battle with a German flier, whom he was successful in sending to earth, and was returning home, when unnoticed he was followed by another German, who was successful in firing on him and sending a bullet through his petrol tank, allowing the gasoline to leak out. He was high in the air but by successful maneuvering he was able to travel the five miles back and landed safely just within the British lines.
He states that the present German offensive is just what the Allies expected, and he has no fear of the final outcome. His many Aylmer friends are delighted to see him and trust his rest at home may do him much good.
Kenneth was living in Toronto when he was married there on June 18, 1919 to Martha Griffin Magwood, of Arthur, Ontario, the daughter of John Wesley Magwood & Lizette Pomeroy.
Biographical information on Kenneth was found in a publication by the Earlscourt History Club, listing Earlscourt area residents who were delegates to the 1927 National Conservative Convention, for the riding of York West:
“Kenneth Vern Stratton, address 171 Westmount Avenue, Toronto. Alternate delegate to the convention.  Born in Delhi, Ontario, May 3, 1896, son of Henry L. Stratton and Edith Gertrude Phillips, Elgin County, Ontario. Educated at Tillsonburg High School, Aylmer High School, University of Toronto (Bachelor of Arts), Osgoode Hall, Barrister-at-law.  Married to Martha Griffin, daughter of Rev. J. W. Magwood, Toronto, and has two children: John and Lois. Called to the Bar 1920. Served during the First World War with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and with the Royal Naval Air Service.  A great grandson of Henry Stratton, a member of the first county council of the County of Elgin and the only Conservative member from his municipality.  Sessional Law Clerk to the Ontario Legislative Assembly, 1927 and 1928.  Secretary of the South York Provincial Conservative Association since its organization and now President of the Wad One York Conservative Association. A member of the York Township High School Board since its inauguration in 1926 and the first vice-chairman of the Board, now chairman of the Board.”
Kenneth’s marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, June 26, 1919:
LIEUT. K. W. STRATTON MARRIED IN TORONTO
Victoria Chapel, Toronto, beautifully decorated with palms and white peonies, was on Wednesday afternoon, June 18th, the scene of a lovely wedding when two graduates of Victoria College were united in wedlock. The bride was Griffin, only daughter of Captain and Mrs. J. W. Magwood, and the groom Flight-Lieut. Kenneth W. Stratton, B.A., R.N.A.S., son of Mr and Mrs H. L. Stratton, of this place. The marriage service was read by Capt. Magwood. The bride, who was given away by her brother, Marsh Magwood, wore a beautiful gown of white kitten’s ear crepe made with a silver coatee. Her net veil, embroidered in pearls, was draped in Grecian fashion from a bandeau of orange blossoms.  Her shower bouquet was of white roses and white sweet peas. Master Gordon Stratton, brother of the groom, in a navy blue serge sailor suit, was a page, and little Miss Evelyn Stinson, in a fairy-like frock of white net, was flower girl, carrying a silver basket netted with sweet peas and sweet heart roses.  Miss True Davidson was maid of honor and wore a turquoise blue crepe du chene gown, black picture hat and Richmond roses.  Miss Marjorie Myers and Miss Lillian Stinson were brides maids and wore quaint old-fashioned gowns of pink taffetta silk and carried shepherdess hooks and sweetheart roses. Their [?] shaped hats were in keeping with the old-time frocks. The bridegroom wore his R.N.A.S. uniform and his groomsman, Mr. Leo Cable, of Aylmer, was in khaki.  The four uniformed ushers were Major Victor W. Dyas, Capt. W.A.C. Curtis, Lieut. Hubert Myers and Lieut. Arnold Stinson, and as the bride and groom left the chapel after the ceremony, they passed beneath the crossed swords of the officers.  After the ceremony a reception was held at the summer residence of Capt and Mrs Magwood, 344 Lake Shore Road, Centre Island, Toronto.  About 100 guests attended the reception, among whom were relatives of the groom from Aylmer, and friends from Detroit, St. Marys and Guelph.  Later Mr and Mrs Stratton left for a motor trip to the States, the bride wearing a smart navy blue suit with hat to match and fox furs.  On their return they will live at the Island, Toronto, for the summer.
Lieut. Stratton heard the call of duty as soon as the war was declared. He was attending University at the time and in September 1914, started his training in Toronto. In 1915 the Imperial Army called for volunteers in Canada and with several other chums, Lieut. Stratton, who had received his commission, went to England to the Royal Warwickshire regiment of the Imperial Army in December 1915.  After a year’s training with the Canadian Officer’s Training Corps in England, where he was engaged in drilling infantry battalions, he was transferred to the Royal navy in September 1916, on account of his ankle giving out through constant drill. He went to sea with the 10th Destroyer Flotilla aboard H.M.S. Nimrod.  He had various running fights with German light forces in the Channel and in the North Sea. Later he joined the Royal Flying Corps and started flying to France early in 1917.  He had many close calls and numerous experiences that can never be forgotten.  He was slightly wounded at Passchendale in 1917 and again in January 1918, being quite badly injured in a crash when his airplane struck the ground after a severe battle with a number of German planes. He fortunately landed in allied territory and was invalided home in March 1918, since which time he has been under the care of military doctors in Toronto, and expects to be finally discharged at any time now.
When Kenneth’s mother died in 1960, he was living in Stratford.  He died on December 7, 1973.

William Murray Stratton

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William Stratton was born on February 15, 1883 at Griffin’s Corners in Bayham, the son of William Stratton (1846-1926) & Isabella Green (1853-1923).  William Stratton Sr. was born in Cayuga, the son of Henry & Elizabeth Stratton, and was living in Bayham when he was married there on December 24, 1874 to Isabella Green, also of Bayham, the daughter of Amasa & Elizabeth Green. They are buried in Straffordville cemetery.
William Murray Stratton was a moulder living at Straffordville when he enlisted for service on June 17, 1918 in London.  He was a widower, but record of his marriage cannot be found.  He names his next of kin as his mother, of Straffordville.
Following the war, he returned to Bayham where he was working as a moulder when he was married on October 25, 1919 in Tillsonburg to Allison M. Stott (1887-1980), a widow living in Bayham.  She was born in Scotland, the daughter of William Swan & Helen Nesbitt.
William died on March 28, 1964 at the age of 81 and is buried in Straffordville cemetery. His wife’s name on the monument is recorded as Allison M. Marshall, 1887-1980.
In addition to the family monument, a military marker bearing the following inscription also marks William’s resting place:
“William Stratton, Sapper Cdn Engrs C.E.F. 28 Mar 1964 Age 81″
His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, April 1, 1964:
WILLIAM M. STRATTON
A resident of Straffordville for the past 30 years, William M. Stratton passed away on Saturday at his residence in his 82nd year. Deceased was born in Bayham Township on February 15, 1883, son of the late William Stratton and Isabel Green.  He was a veteran of World War I and served in the Veterans Guard during World War II.  He was a member of the United Church, Straffordville, and of Vienna Masonic Lodge No. 237 A.F. & A.M.
Survivors are his wife, the former Alice Marshall; one daughter, Mrs. Gerald (Jean) Grimmell of Fort Erie; one son, Hugh Stratton of Valois, PQ; seven grandchildren and one great grandchild. Rested at the H. A. Ostrander and Son Funeral Home where service was conducted Tuesday at 2 p.m. by Rev. A. J. Cook of the United Church, Straffordville.
Pallbearers were Robert Grant, D. Vallee, Lyle Grant, Lyle Walsh, Blake Wolfe and James Jones. Interment in Straffordville Cemetery.
Masonic service was largely attended Monday at 8 p.m. at the funeral home, conduted under the auspices of Vienna Lodge No. 237 A.F. and A.M. Wor. Master Hugh [illegible] in charge, assisted by Wor. Bro. Lyle Walsh, secretary and Wor. Bro. Lloyd Chute, chaplain.

Clarence Alberton Strong

3134056  Clarence Strong
Clarence Strong was born on September 30, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of Levi Leonard Strong (1868-1914) & Harriet Matilda Kulp (1867-1962).  Levi was born in Bayham, the son of Samuel Strong & Fanny S. Maslen, and was a farmer living in Dorchester when he was married on March 23, 1892 in St. Thomas to Hattie Kulp, a resident of Bayham born in Caistor, Lincoln County, daughter of William Henry Kulp & Cornelia Spiece.  Levi died on the 8th concession of Malahide near Glencolin.  He and Harriet are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Clarence was a farmer living in the Aylmer area when he enlisted for service on May 6, 1918 in London. He served in Canada and was discharged on January 1, 1919.
He was married in Aylmer on October 18, 1922 to Mabel Fitzpatrick (1901-1991), of Malahide, daughter of Ora Fitzpatrick & Bertha Demaray.
Clarence died on September 18, 1979 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 26, 1979:
CLARENCE ALBERTON STRONG
Clarence Alberton Strong, 81, of 54 ½ Mitchell St., St. Thomas, and formerly of Springfield, died Tuesday, Sept. 18, in the Memorial Continuing Care Centre, St. Thomas.
He was born in Malahide Township on Sept. 30, 1897. He was the son of the late Levi and Harriet (Kulpe) Strong. Mr. Strong had resided in St. Thomas since 1962. Prior to that he lived in Springfield. He was a farmer, a road man for Canadian Canners, and a salesman.
Surviving are his wife, the former Mable Fitzpatrick; son, Harold of London; daughter, Mrs. James (Irene) Aitken of Burlington; sister, Mrs. Myrtle Parker of Sparta; three grandchildren and three great grandchildren. He was predeceased by one brother, Seaward Strong.
The funeral was held Friday, Sept. 21 from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home. Rev. George Shields of Littlewood conducted the service. Burial was made in Aylmer Cemetery.  Pallbearers were Bill Hollister, Norman Brooks, Gilbert Hiepleh, Clinton Kipp, Lyle Grant and Ron Strong.  Flowers were carried by Bill Hough, Fred Shively, Ray Abell and Jim Longfield.

Arthur Such

53742   
Arthur Such was born on September 27, 1890 at Barton-on-Stather, Lincolnshire,  the son of Arthur Cyril Such (1862-1898) & Alice Thompson, who were married in Lincolnshire in 1889.  Arthur died in Lincolnshire in 1898, and Alice was remarried to Arthur Waddingham in 1900. Alice & Arthur Waddingham are found on the 1901 census in England living in South Ferriby, Lincolnshire, but son Arthur Such does not appear with them.  There is however, an Arthur Such, described as a “relative” living with Fred & Louie Fowler on the 1901 census in Sculcoates, Yorkshire.  Arthur is 10, and was born in Hull, Yorkshire.
Arthur emigrated to Canada at the age of 14, leaving Liverpool on the ship Tunisian, and arriving in Montreal on November 12, 1904.  The passenger list states he was born in Lincolnshire and his destination was Aylmer.  He is found on the 1911 census in Malahide, a labourer living with Maynard & Emma Carter.  He was a nephew of Harry & Florence (Thompson) Hewbank of Richmond.
Arthur enlisted for service on November 2, 1914 in St. Thomas. His address is not given, but he states he was born at Barton-Stather, Lincolnshire. He names his next of kin as his mother, Alice Waddingham, of 1 Greek Street, Hawthorne Ave., Hull, England.  He was a dairyman, and had served in the 30th Battery, C.F.A.
A letter from Arthur to his aunt & uncle, Mr & Mrs Harry Hewbank, was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 18, 1915:
AYLMER AND MALAHIDE BOYS IN BELGIUM STILL ARE WELL
Mr and Mrs Harry Hewbank, of Richmond, have received the following interesting letter from their nephew, Arthur Such, who enlisted here with the First Canadian Expeditionary Forces, now in France and Belgium. He tells some interesting tales of their everyday experience.
Belgium, 5th Oct. 1915
Dear Aunt and Uncle:
Well we are all quite well and enjoying ourselves as best we can over here. We are out of the trenches at present for a rest.  We do six days in and six days out.  It is rather nasty here now, lots of rain and mud.  Fritz across the line makes it quite interesting for us at times.  He doesn’t seem to care just where he slings his shells.  Last Sunday evening we had just prepared a nice little supper in an old hog pen at a farm, when along came a few souvenirs from “Fritz”. Well if you ever saw any one doing a run at five yard dashes, it was us. We started for the dugouts, just a little way off.  Just as we’d get started to run another would be on its way, and we’d lay flat until it had struck and exploded.  We were a little afraid it would knock our tea kettle over, as it passed directly over our little hog pen, and hit a hotel across the road. Several dropped around us but did no damage to amount to anything.  Our tea was all right when we got back to it, but some of the boys had theirs knocked over.  They were in a barn about 50 yards away and a shell came through the roof and exploded.
I had a fine box of cakes and cigarettes from home on my birthday.  Also over here they fired a salute of 21 guns and sent up some very nice fire works at night.  Of course I do not suppose it was all on my account though.
You would no doubt hear the news of the great move made the other night all along the line. We are credited with having been in that.
Well I think I will have to ring off for this time, hoping everybody is well and happy. Remember me to all and try and let us hear from you some times.
Your affectionate nephew, Arthur
18th Battalion, C. Co., No. 52742, 2nd Canadian Div., 4th Infantry Brig., B.E.F., Army P.O., London, England.
Arthur returned from overseas on January 19, 1917, arriving in St. John’s, New Brunswick. He was awarded the Bravery Medal for saving a soldier’s life in combat. He had to remove his gas mask in order to free the soldier from barbed wire.  He was exposed to mustard gas and suffered from the effects the rest of his life.
Arthur returned to Aylmer and was working as a butter maker there when he was married on April 7, 1920 at Oliver in East Nissouri Township to Eva May Darling (1898-1975), of Oliver, the daughter of Alexander Darling & Rachel McLeod.  On the marriage record, Arthur states he was born in Yorkshire. Arthur & Eva later moved to Kerwood.
Arthur died on August 21, 1964 and is buried with his wife in Strathroy Cemetery. The inscription on his monument reads: “Arthur Such, M.M. Corporal, 18 Battn. C.E.F. 21 Aug 1964 age 73″.
His obituary appeared in the Strathroy Age Dispatch, August 27, 1964:
ARTHUR SUCH
Arthur Such, 73, died Friday following a lengthy illness in Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital.  Born in England, he had lived in Canada for 59 years, and spent 32 years in Kerwood.  He was an inspector for the Department of Agriculture and was Past Master of Ionic Lodge A.F. & A.M. No. 328, Napier.
Surviving are: his wife, the former Eva Darling, of Kerwood; daughter, Mrs. Reginald (Eileen) Freer, of Kerwood; three grandchildren and five great grandchildren; brother, Percy, of Windsor; Norman, British Columbia; Clarence and Cyril, both in England, and a sister Doris, in England.
A Masonic service was held at Denning Brothers Funeral Home on Sunday evening. Rev. C. S. Ripley of St. Paul’s Anglican Church, Kerwood, conducted funeral services at the funeral home on Monday. Interment was in Strathroy Cemetery. Pall bearers were: Donald Pollock, Clifford Johnson, Fred Woods, William Burdon, Fred Richardson, and Gordon McIntyre.

John William Such

53743  John William Such
William’s  name appears in a letter printed in the Aylmer Express, November 26, 1914 from “the Aylmer Boys” while in London awaiting their journey overseas. His name is not included in any previous lists of recruits, nor is his place of residence given on his attestation paper.  John was born on June 12, 1894 at Barton-on-Stather, Lincolnshire, the son of Arthur Cyril Such (1862-1898) & Alice Thompson, who were married in Lincolnshire in 1889.  Arthur died in Lincolnshire in 1898, and Alice was remarried to Arthur Waddingham in 1900. John is found on the 1901 census in England with Alice & Arthur Waddingham, living in South Ferriby, Lincolnshire.
William Such emigrated to Canada about 1909 and is found on the 1911 census in Bayham township census as a farm labourer living with Cicero & Mary McConkey.  John was a nephew of Harry & Florence (Thompson) Hewbank of Richmond.
He enlisted for service on October 29, 1914 in St. Thomas. He was a dairyman and was not married.  He had served one year in the boys’ brigade in England.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Alice Waddingham, of #1 Greek Street, Hawthorne Ave., Hazel Road, Hull, England.
Before returning to Canada after the war, William was married on June 18, 1919 in Yorkshire to Doris Booth, of Hull, Yorkshire.
It is believed William & Doris returned to Aylmer, where there were living when a son was born in 1921 and a daughter in 1924.  The Aylmer Express records the birth of a daughter to J. W. Such, of Brigden, in 1928, so it appears they had left Aylmer by that date.
Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, August 14, 1919:
SUCH – BOOTH
Interesting Wedding of Former Aylmer Man in England
A very pretty wedding took place at Hull, Yorkshire, on June 18th last, when Regimental Sergeant-Major J. W. Such, 18th Canadian Battalion, of Aylmer, became united in marriage to Miss D. Booth, of Hull, Yorkshire. The Rev. W. H. Hewitt, M.A., officiated. The bride, who was given away by her father, was daintily attired in a dress of Crepe Rajah with bead and silver trimmings. She wore a bridal veil and carried a sheaf of roses.  The bridesmaids were the Misses B. Woodmansey, friend of bride and D. Waddington, sister of the bridegroom, and Kathleen Sales, cousin of bride. The two elder bridesmaids were attired in dresses of pale grey with blue trimmings and hats to match and carried bouquets of sweet peas.  Little Kathleen wore a dress of pale blue with tiny pink rose buds and carried a basket of sweet peas. Lance-Corporal C. Such, N.F., brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. The bridegroom, who is an Aylmer boy, joined the 18th Canadian Battalion in 1914 and has since been overseas. He served in France with that unit until wounded in September 1916. He expects to return with his bride to Aylmer where they will settle.  They were the recipients of many presents.  A short honeymoon was spent in Lincolnshire. Previous to enlisting, Mr. Such resided with Mr and Mrs H. Hewbank, his uncle and aunt.
A letter from William Such was printed in the Aylmer Express, July 1, 1915:
ENGLAND FULL OF SOLDIERS
Says Bugler Wm. Such, of Aylmer, in an Interesting Letter
Aylmer Boys with the 18th all Well, and Anxious to get a Crack at the Germans
Sandling West, Hythe, Kent, England.   June 8, 1915
To the Editor:
Dear Sir – Having a few spare moments I thought I would write a few lines for your valuable paper.  Well, we the Aylmer boys are here in England yet, and like everything fine, but one thing I am sorry to say, and I think I speak for nearly everyone, and that is we may be here too long.  Everyone seems anxious to get a crack at the Germans while the weather is good. Before I go any farther I must say that the trip across the Atlantic was splendid. The weather was good, the water was calm, and the numerous boats that passed made things exciting. The trip took about two weeks from leaving London, Ont. until we reached Sandling. We were escorted by H.M.S. Cumberland and three or four torpedo destroyers, and we had to travel without lights at night. There is only one thing I didn’t like about the trip, and that was some 20 of us had the mumps, but none were very serious. We docked at Havenmouth about 9 a.m., April 30, and I am sure I never saw prettier scenery than I saw there, and it is equally as nice where we are now.
Sandling is about five miles from Folkestone, which is a summer resort. The buildings there are magnificent. For about ten miles around here is nothing but camps, in fact I think England is full of soldiers, it seems as if khaki were the fashion for men this year, in fact it is for women as well.
The Germans have made on an average about two raids a week on England since we have ben here, but have not done much damage. They have been as close as 20 miles to our camp.  British aeroplanes and dirigibles are seen often around here.
Private houses have been given up in large numbers for use as hospitals and for the comfort of the soldiers.  There are a large number of Belgium and French refugees at Folkestone, and they seem to be very sociable to the overseas contingent.
There are soldiers’ clubs at every camp, put there by Lord Kitchener, Sir John French, Admiral Jellioce and such men. These clubs furnish a dry canteen, writing tables, in fact, everything to aid in making things comfortable.  We haven’t the slightest idea when we will go over to the continent, but I hope it will be soon.
Now I think I have said sufficient, so I will conclude with many thanks to the people of Aylmer for what they did before we left. I remain yours very sincerely,
Bugler Wm. Such, 18th Battalion.
Another letter from William was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 18, 1915:
AYLMER BOYS IN FRANCE ALL WELL AND HAPPY
Have Not Seen any Severe Fighting Yet, But are Ready
Somewhere in Belgium, Oct. 31, 1915
To the Editor of the Aylmer Express:
While I have a few moments to spare, I thought I would dash a few lines to Aylmer. This is Sunday night and although the wind is blowing quite cold, and the rain beating on the roof of our little shack, it does not make any difference to the volley of the big guns, and the cracking of the rifles. We can just step outside of the hut and see the star shells going up, which light up both our trenches and the enemy’s. Sometimes these lights put me in mind of Toronto or London exhibitions, or even Aylmer fair at night when they have fireworks.  But these lights and guns going off are the real thing, therefore it makes it much more interesting than the fall fairs.
The Aylmer boys are all well and happy. We are enjoying this life fine, considering the conditions here. We have not seen any real severe fighting yet, but I think we are ready for anything that comes along. All the boys are on the lookout for souvenirs. Some have been lucky enough to find a German helmet, others have found rifles, etc.
I think this is about all for this time. Hoping this finds everybody well in Aylmer as it leaves us all the very best.
Yours very truly, Bugler J. Wm. Such, No. 53743 C. Co., 18th Canadian Batt.
A letter written by William from an English hospital was printed in the Aylmer Express, October 26, 1916:
GERMANS ARE DIRTY FIGHTERS
Writes Bugler Wm. Such, a Former Malahide Boy in a Letter to An Aylmer Friend
Was Wounded in a Battle on the Somme and is Now in an English Hospital
British Firing Five Shells to the Huns One
Ward No. 3, East Leeds War Hospital,
Leeds, York, England, Sept. 25th, 1916
Dear Friend –
A few lines to let you know I am progressing fine.  I suppose you will wonder why I did not write, but of course I have been travelling quite a bit lately, from France to England, into several hospitals. Things have been very inconvenient to settle down to anything.  I am pleased to say I am not wounded very seriously, although quite bad enough. I was wounded with shrapnel in the left side and back. The shrapnel penetrated quite deep and stopped about one inch from my spine, so I consider myself very lucky.
I was operated on at Etaples, France at No. 1 Canadian General Hospital and had shrapnel taken out. I was about one week there and then moved to England to this hospital. You see Leeds is only about 50 or 60 miles from my home, so I am very lucky. No doubt some of the folks will come up to see me. I expect I can get up in a day or two.  I am anxious to hear whether Dick and Art are well, also Bill Turner, although when I was wounded they were still safe.
Oh, my! that was one awful battle. The dead fairly covered the ground (mostly Germans though). We lost a lot who were killed, of course. In fact, the biggest share of the Battalion were wounded or killed. It was certainly an awful sight, men blown all to pieces.  Arms and legs here and there.  I was real lucky to get out alive and no doubt about it, but really I wouldn’t have missed it for anything.
We took hundreds of prisoners, but really it’s a shame to take them prisoners.  Every one should be killed but of course you can’t find time to kill them all, as we have to get to our objective as quickly as we can. I had a chance to get some dandy souvenirs, but you see I couldn’t be bothered with them. I am used real well by the nurses.  Lots of comforts and all that.  Well the lights are being turned out so I will have to finish this in the morning.
Sept. 26, 1916
Well, here we are again after a good night’s sleep and a good breakfast. I understand the Zeppelins were over again last night and also hear they were at Hull. They brought two down about nights ago [sic].
The people are very frightened at night in England, but really there is no real need to be, because they don’t do much damage, but of course I suppose they can’t tell where the bombs will light. The morning of the big battle, the shells were coming over in hundreds, all around us. Of course the casualty list will show that. But the Germans certainly got five shells back tot heir one, or even more. They got one good licking that morning and no mistake about it.  I wouldn’t have wanted to be on their side. The Huns threw up their hands as soon as we got close tot hem, but in some cases that didn’t save them. There was one German prisoner very badly wounded, so he asked one of our men if he would give him a drop of water and dress his wound, so he took pity on him and began dressing his wound, and as soon as he turned his back to attend to him, one of the other Germans shot at him, so he left this man and went after the other damned coward, and he threw up his hands and said ‘mercy kemerad’, but he took no mercy and showed none after that.  They are a dirty lot of fighters, in fact they won’t fight with the bayonet.
Well, think this is about all for this time. Will write again in a day or so.  Love to all,
I remain as ever, William Such
Bugler J. Wm. Such, No. 53743, enlisted with the 18th Batt., and left London, Ont., April 18th, 1915 for overseas.  Trained at Sandling Camp until Sept. 12th 1915, when he left for the firing line. Went in the trenches the 20th of Sept. 1915, and was wounded on the 20th Sept. 1916.
William Such writes again in October, and his letter was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 23, 1916:
AYLMER MAN IN AN ENGLISH CONVALESCENT CAMP
Bugler Wm. Such, of Aylmer, Was Wounded the First Day the Famous British Tanks Were Used
Had A Close Shave From Death
England, 30-10-16
To the Editor of the Express:
Dear Sir –
As I have a few minutes to spare I thought I would just sit down and write a few lines to the home paper. I sincerely hope these few lines will find the people of Aylmer in good health and spirits, as it leaves me in very fair condition, considering what I, along with the rest of the boys have gone through in the last year.  I do not know exactly who was wounded among the Aylmer boys with the 18th while at the Somme, but I hope they are no more serious than I.  My wound was only slight, although a very close shave, as it just missed my spine.  However, ‘all is well that ends well’. I can assure you the 18th Batt. can be proud of what they accomplished in the ‘Big Push’. They made their assault on the morning of the 15th of September, just one year from the time they landed in France. They took large numbers of prisoners, who came over with a smile on their faces. I can quite understand why we take so many prisoners. Our artillery is so much superior to the enemy’s, and our ammunition supplies are abundant. We have full control of the air, and the ‘tanks’ above all things are without a doubt, a wonderful invention. The morning of the 15th September was their first wonderful work. The Huns were terrified to death almost, and no wonder, for what they do not kill with their guns, the tanks crush.  I think their speed limit in action is about four to five miles per hour.
I was wounded quite early in the morning and was conveyed to a hospital (Canadian) where I was operated on. From there I went to a hospital in good old England, where I received the best of care until the wound was healed. Then I was sent down here to a Canadian Convalescent camp. It is a very nice place, and at present I am employed as bugler.
We are having rather nasty weather at present, so much rain.  I hope, as does everybody else, that this campaign will soon be over so that we can all get back to dear old Aylmer once again. Wishing you the best of health and success,
Yours sincerely, Bug. J. Wm. Such, 5373 18th Can. Batt.
B. 84 Div. Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park, Epsone, Eng.
William Such died on December 25, 1956 at the age of 62.  He is buried with his wife, Doris Booth (1898-1988) in St. James Anglican Cemetery, Crown Hill, Vespra Township, Simcoe County. In addition to the family monument, a military stone with the following inscription marks his resting place: “John W. Such, Flight Lieutenant, R.C.A.F. 25 Dec 1956 age 62″

Russell Clare Summerhayes

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Russell Clare Summerhayes was born on May 1, 1897 in Port Burwell, the son of James Summerhayes & Rosetta Wheeler (1873-1899).  James was born in Simcoe, the son of William & Asenath Summerhayes, and was farming in Walsingham township when he was married there on December 21, 1892 to Rosetta Wheeler, also of Walsingham, the daughter of Henry & Margaret.  James & Rosetta lived at lot 12, concession 1 Bayham, where she died in 1899 at the age of 26. James was remarried, and they moved to Sault Ste. Marie.
Russell Clare Summerhayes was a clerk living at 254 Murray Street, Sault Ste. Marie when he enlisted for service on January 25, 1918 in Toronto.
No further information is known.

F. L. Summers

The name F. L. Summers is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916.
It is believed this man is Leonard Fawcett Summers, a brother of Sydney Summers, who enlisted in St. Thomas in 1916.  A passenger list was found for Leonard Summers, 42, his wife Adelaide, 40, and Sydney Summers, 41. They left Liverpool on the ship Franconia, and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts on June 5, 1913.  Their destination was Aylmer, Ontario.  Leonard & Sydney were hotel proprietors in England, but their intended occupation in Canada was farming.
Leonard Fawcett Summers was born in Richmond, Surrey, England in 1869, the son of George Henry Summers & Phoebe Matilda Morris, who were married in London, England in 1868.  The family is found on the 1891 England census living at 24 High Street, Wimbledon, Surrey.
Leonard was married in 1897 in Kent, England to Adelaide Frances Croft.
No attestation paper can be found for Leonard.  It is possible he returned to England and enlisted there.  Note that his brother Sydney’s attestation paper dated 1916 names his brother Leonard Fawcett Summers of London, England as his next of kin.

Sydney George Summers

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The name S. T. Summers is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916. It is believed this actually refers to Sydney George Summers.
Sydney Summers was born on December 11, 1871 in Richmond, Surrey, England, the son of George Henry Summers & Phoebe Matilda Morris, who were married in London, England in 1868.  The family is found on the 1891 England census living at 24 High Street, Wimbledon, Surrey.
Sydney emigrated to Canada with his brother Leonard in 1913.  They left Liverpool on the ship Franconia, and arrived in Boston, Massachusetts on June 5, 1913.  Their destination was Aylmer, Ontario.  Leonard & Sydney were hotel proprietors in England, but their intended occupation in Canada was farming.
Sydney was living in Aylmer, employed as a bookkeeper when he enlisted for service on April 12, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his brother, Leonard Fawcett Summers of 12A Fisher Street, Bloomsbury, London, England.  Sydney had served in the 30th Battery C.F.A.
No further information can be found.

Corporal George Swadling

491218  George Swadling
The name “George Swaddling” is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916.  Passenger lists show a George & Henry Swadling arriving in Canada on April 13, 1913.
An attestation paper was found for Corporal George Swadling, who was born on December 28, 1885 in London, England.  He was a labourer, not married, and enlisted for service on January 11, 1915 in London. He names his next of kin as his William Swadling, of Hamstead, London, England.
George Swadling was the son of George William Swadling (1847-1920) & Matilda Vale (1850-1893). They family is found on the 1901 census living at 9 Golden Hill Terrace, Hendon, Middlesex, England.  His father had remarried to Jane Sarah W. Willis.  George was 16 years of age and was a gardener.
A letter from George was published in the Aylmer Express, July 20, 1916:
WAR WILL NOT LAST ANOTHER WINTER
That is the Opinion in England – Letter from Corp. George Swadling,
an Aylmer Boy Overseas
West Sandling, Kent, England, June 26th, 1916
Dear Mr and Mrs Campbell:
You will no doubt think I have completely forgotten you, but I can assure you that such is not the case. I do not intend to plead “too busy”; I am merely going to lay the full facts before you and leave you to judge whether I am guilty of negligence or forgiveness.  I am not quite sure whether I have written to you since we landed in England or not; if not, I must commence at the beginning; which is – our arrival in this country. After a splendid voyage across the ocean, we arrived at Liverpool on Saturday, 25th March, at about 4 p.m. We left Halifax on 17th March; so that the voyage took us eight days. We were kept on board the boat at Liverpool until 11 p.m., and were then marched right on to a train that was waiting to convey us we knew not where.  We pulled out from Liverpool about 11:30 p.m., and being strictly warned about having the window blinds drawn, and, of course, travelling at night, we could not see anything of the country as we speeded through.  To add to our discomfort, we were piled in, eight in a compartment, about as large as a rabbit hutch, which, with all our kit, etc., wasn’t sufficient room to enable one to sit down, stand up, or do anything else. Sleep was out of the question. We were all very glad when next morning (Sunday) we arrived at our destination, Shorncliffe, which is about 3 miles from Folestone and about 10 miles from Dover. So you see we are quite handy to be shipped across the Channel to France; in fact, on a clear day the coast of France can be seen very distinctly. Well, to proceed, we immediately formed up and marched to our camp on St. Martin’s Plain, which is about 3 miles from Folkescliffe.  This was a very nice camp indeed, as we had a beautiful sea view from our quarters, and the surrounding country is lovely.
There is a very old church adjoining the camp ground, where I used to attend services. The caretaker told me part of the chancel was built in the ninth century, and he also told me that Sir Walter Raleigh’s granddaughter was buried there.  It is a lovely old church, covered with ivy, and I am sorry that owing to our being moved, I can no longer attend services there. We stayed at St. Martin’s Plain for about three weeks, and were then moved to West Sandling, our present camp, which is about four miles further inland.
I do not like this camp nearly as well, the location being not nearly as nice as St. Martin’s, although the scenery around is beautiful; in fact, it is the same all over Kent, and all over England for that matter. We are all worked fearfully hard here, the boys having to drill continuously from 8 to 12 and from 1 to 5 p.m. Training in Canada was child’s play compared with what we get here.
We have already sent three drafts to France since we have been here, so that now our battalion is only about 400 strong, which, of course, necessitates everybody doing extra duties.  I understand that we are to be reinforced by troops coming from Canada, as we have to keep sending troops over to France in order to reinforce the 1st Battalion. I am still staying with the same job, although I am seriously thinking of giving it up, as if I keep it my chances of seeing the firing line are very remote; and I certainly want to go over there, as I do not consider I am doing my bit if I remain in England all the time.  It seems suggest “cold feet” which I might say I certainly do not possess.
I have had only one pass since I have been in England, and that was at Easter when I had six days’ leave. I went home to London and after an absence of nine years, I was very pleased to get home, and my folks were very pleased to see me – at least, that was what they said.  I have not had a minute’s leave since then, and just at present I can’t see any ahead as it is very difficult to get away.  However, I suppose it will all come right in the end. The general opinion here seems to be that the war will not last another winter.  I sincerely hope it will not, and I think there are thousands of others of the same mind.
While I was in London on leave, I had the experience of witnessing a Zeppelin raid.  I distinctly saw the Zepps, as there were dozens of searchlights concentrated on it; it was a fine sight to see the shells bursting all around it. I was perfectly safe, as I should imagine it must have been a mile away.  There were huge crowds in the city watching it without fear apparently, although I noticed a good many making for the underground stations, where one is perfectly safe. We have never been bothered with Zepps over our camp as yet, although they dropped bombs here last November, killing 14 Canadian soldiers.  We frequently have British airships hovering over our lines.
I have not seen any of the other Aylmer boys since our arrival in England.  I have not even seen Billy Butcher, who is in the same battalion as I, for several weeks, so I assume he has gone in one of the drafts to France.  I have seen my brother, whose wounds prompted me to enlist.  He is stationed at Dover, which is, as I have said, quite close to us. He has already been in France twice, having been wounded twice, and he is soon to go again. In addition, there are two more brothers quite close here, also in training. So it is probable we four will all be on the firing line together, although, of course, we may not be near each other.
I received a copy of the Aylmer Express (the only one I have had since landing in this country) and in it I read about the Easter services in Trinity Church, which, of course, greatly interested me. I sincerely hope you will remember me to all old friends in the choir.
Now, my dear friends, I hope you are both in the best of health, and Gordon also.  As for myself, I never felt better, and I positively am getting fat, impossible as it may sound.  I must now close with very best wishes to yourselves, and all. I remain,
Your sincere friend, Corp. George Swadling
A photo of George, with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Corp. Geo. Swaddling was born in England and came to this country about 12 years ago, and has resided here ever since, until he felt it his duty to go and do his bit at the front. He enlisted with the 33rd Batt., and is now at the front doing his share in the great struggle”.
George returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 14.  The passenger list states he was with the 33rd Battalion, and his residence was London.
A marriage announcement in the January 17, 1928 issue of the St. Thomas Times-Journal was found for a George W. Swadling, of London to Hilda Lambert, daughter of Edward, also of London, on January 14: “At St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, Ontario, on Saturday afternoon, a charming wedding took place when Hilda, daughter of Mr and Mrs Edward Lambert, Central avenue, was married to George W. Swadling, also of London. Very Rev. Dean L. N. Tucker officiated.”
No further information is known.

Harry Arthur Sykes

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Harry Sykes was born on December 22, 1875 in Huddersfield, York, England, the son of Charles & Hannah Sykes.  Harry and his wife Amy emigrated to Canada about 1909.  He was a butcher living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 14, 1916 in Tillsonburg.
A letter from Harry was printed in the Aylmer Express, June 7, 1917:
GERMANS STRIP COFFINS OF ALL METAL
No Mind Can Describe Awfulness of their Crimes
Progress of British is Wonderful
Sergt. Harry Sykes, of Aylmer, who is attached to Headquarters Staff, in France, has written the following descriptive letter to Mr and Mrs Harry Hewbank, of Richmond.
Somewhere in France, 9 / 5 / 17
Dear Harry and Mrs. Hewbank:
I hope these few lines find you enjoying the best of health and children as well.  I think at present I never felt better, having been in a rest camp for a week and I now feel as fit as a fiddle.  Knowing how interested you always were in this terrible war, I know that a few lines from me, giving you some idea of the state of things existing in France, the country they call “Sunny” but I call it “Muddy” would be acceptable.
I might say that there is no pen made, nor is there a mind or brain born, that can accurately describe the awfulness of the whole business. One can read and see pictures and draw some sort of an idea, that one imagines it might be, but see the real ting and imagination fades away in horror.
I have gone through towns and villages, at least they were on the map, but now nothing but heaps of bricks and mortar blown to stones and not a thing left standing. What have been at one time beautiful residences, prosperous farms, and splendid historic churches and cathedrals, just wantonly levelled to the ground. I was in one town four days after the Germans had been driven out and all of a sudden the church blew up. They had a timed mine placed there, so that it would blow the church up after their evacuation and probably kill a lot of British.
Honestly I was half a mile away when it blew up, but I really thought I had gone to glory, the concussion was so violent.
And then one sees the real ferociousness of the German, one begins to wonder why they ever belonged to the human race.
I am not allowed on strict military orders to give you any idea of my whereabouts perchance this letter gets into hands than otherwise intended for and possibly giving information to the enemy. Therefore you will have to read between the lines. But when I say I have not seen a civilian for 6 weeks, you will know that I am not in a picture palace.
I have been in graveyards where they have actually stripped the coffins of all metal and left them burst open, and they even take public monuments out of any place if they are made of metal, and any marble structure, well, and simply destroy it.
I have had an opportunity to see more than the average man has, as I am attached to Headquarters and travel about a great deal, so you see I get to see things that scores over here know nothing about.
I was over one of the battle fields, I must not mention the name, but it was one of the greatest battles in history. The French had tried time after time and then they were secretly replaced by the British, and they got Fritzy. Well, I went over that battle field for miles and the shells had ploughed the ground up time after time, opening up graves of the French and German soldiers buried before and scattering them all over. Corpses here and there and everywhere. Arms, legs, heads and all the necessaries of soldiers scattered all over. Oh, it was fearful and no one can describe in properly.
But there is one thing most noticeable and makes one feel proud to be British. One comes across scores of unburied Germans and French, but the British are always buried, (even if roughly) and a bottle left in the grave containing the names and regimental number of the dead. So you see that even in war in all its horrors you find a different spirit in the British both to the living and the dead, to all other countries.
Just to give you some idea of the gruesomeness of the Germans, I will tell you what I have seen hundreds of. You have probably read of gas bombs, containing poisonous gasses. Well, I have come across hundreds of the empty cases of these German gas bombs, and they have written on one side in English and the other in French, “Good to take with cold meat, chicken, fish and vegetable soups”. Now does that show what ferocious devils they are.
But putting on one side for a moment the horrible part of the German nation and study the clever and scientific means they employ and one has to give them credit for being a nation of immense energy and resourcefulness.
If they had as much consciousness in their mode of warfare as they have cruelty and maliciousness, they would be a clever and worthy foe.  I have been in some of their dugouts, with four flights of stairs down them and they had cooking stoves just like a home, in some cases electric lights and even pianos. Just simply wonderful, and the more one studies over what he sees the more he marvels how on earth they were ever driven out of their practically impregnable positions. And then again if you saw the British guns in action, you would say nothing could live.
However, the task to beat the Germans is a gib one and as I said before, if the British people only had some slight idea of the immensity of the task that their soldiers have, well they would have more patience.
Believe me, as an eyewitness, the progress the British have made against this clever but unscrupulous nation is just wonderful.  They never clear out of a town or village without cutting all the fruit trees down and poisoning all the water supplies so that our soldiers get no water.
Well, now I will close as I guess my letter is getting monotonous.  Remember me to Mr and Mrs Gibson, also to Mr and Mrs Jibson and any enquiring friends. Hoping to see you after the war, (if I am lucky enough to get through) enjoying good health and prosperity, I remain
Yours sincerely, Sergeant Harry A. Sykes
Another letter from Harry was printed in the Aylmer Express, August 2, 1917:
FRANCE A COUNTRY TERRIBLE TO LOOK UPON
Village after Village now but a pile of Debris.
 Ruined Churches Desecrated by Hun’s Filthy Epitaphs
Cemeteries Pillaged and Monuments Destroyed
SIGHTS ON BATTLE FIELDS REVOLTING
German Dead Everywhere. Every Britisher Given Decent Burial
Prisoners Wavering in Confidence in Kaiser and Hindenburg
Sgt. Harry A. Sykes, an Aylmer man, whose duties necessitate him travelling all over France, in the following interesting letter to Rev. Chas. Miles, of this place, tells the real conditions in France as he has seen them, and says if the folks at home could only see the Hun defences, they would not think things were moving slow, but would say the advance was marvelous.
Somewhere in France, June 14
Dear Mr. Miles –
I hope these few lines find you in good health as they leave me at present. This has been an easy day for me. I thought I could not employ it better than writing to you, who I know takes a great interest in this war, and giving you some idea of how I have found things here since I wrote you last on 15-2-17.
Well, since then I have travelled some, both by day and by night, both comfortable and uncomfortable. Sometimes in a cattle truck, next in an automobile, then a transport, anything or anyhow to get where one is ordered. The more one travels the more one sees, and the more one travels in the trail of the Huns, the more of their dastardly work he comes up against. If the Germans had spent the last forty years studying nothing else but to find and invent the most diabolical methods of warfare, they could not have been more successful, for if there is any new horror, anything mean, cruel or ferocious, they will possess it, and use it too, with a vengeance.  I have gone over the battlefields where some of the toughest fights have taken place and the sights are simply revolting, but at the same time makes one feel more and more determined that Germany, who is responsible for it all, must be crushed. One thing has struck me very forcibly, wherever I have crossed these deserts of death, one scarcely comes across a British corpse. You will find their graves, though rough, as decent as the circumstances will permit and always something left for identification. But lying everywhere, French and German corpses unburied, left just as they fell and lots more that had been lightly covered with earth and the first rain washed them open again. Just fearful.
Soldiers in dozens, caught in the barbed wire entanglements, as they had been left by their retreating brother Huns. Awful gruesome, but true. And when these German fiends retreat, what do they leave. Well, I venture to say there is not another nation on earth so scientific in barbaric destruction of a beautiful country, that could have compared with them; it is a country now terrible to look upon. Until one sees is, he cannot imagine the completeness of the destruction.
You will come across a mile of nothing but brick and mortar debris, you might see an old bedstead sticking out of a pile, and that is all you could see to lead you to think that there once stood a beautiful village. The officer pulls his map out, the village is on the map, but has disappeared from the face of the earth, nothing but the debris left. I am not alluding to ONE place, it is EVERY place.
I have been in what they have left of ruined churches, and not being content with the utter devastation of architectural beauty, they have gone further into the desecration of these holy places by placing filthy epitaphs on parts left standing. One asks himself the question: What benefit can they possibly derive from such barbaric works as this?  But it is their degraded nature, just their love of sheer, wanton, merciless outrage. One comes across a graveyard beside a ruined church, where marble and expensive monuments of all descriptions, have been ruthlessly destroyed and brought down. The coffins brought out of the vaults and thrown in heaps like so much scrap iron, some burst open and the remains scattered anywhere. Anything of metallic value is stripped off and taken away, and the vaults made into dug-outs for German soldiers. I could tell things that are not fit for a pen to describe and it just makes one’s blood run cold at the thought of it all.
Again, we were in a ruined town 6 weeks ago, which before the war, had 14,000 inhabitants, and I am told was one of the most beautiful and prosperous towns in France, now just desolate ruins, public monuments levelled to the ground, and although they had been out of town 4 days, they had left all sorts of devilish contrivances so that mines would blow up and kill or maim the enemy.
We would want water for drinking or cooking. No water until it has been analyzed. Invariably the answer is, “Yes it is poisoned”. And then, off the water wagons are sent, perhaps miles away, and even if no trace of poison can be found, all water for cooking an drinking purposes is chemically treated. And then can you blame a soldier for hating everything German.
Another of their diabolical tricks is to pick out the best and likeliest bathing places in the rivers, and place sharp pointed sticks in the river bed and coils upon coils of barbed wire. So that when a soldier goes to take a dip he dives head first on to these stakes and becomes entangled in the wire. These are some of their methods of warfare. They even poison their shrapnel, so that if the wound caused is only slight, they expect the poison to complete the work.  So you see one cannot be too careful as there is nothing too low down for a German to resort to.
But their day of retribution will surely come and they are gradually being worn down to defeat. They lost Vimy Ridge and now Messines Ridge, which was a position of great natural strength and all the German ingenuity had been centred on this place to make it absolutely impregnable. For nearly three years they have held it, making it stronger every day. They said it could not be taken, but it was. They say they can’t be defeated, but they will.
Considering the magnitude of the task of the Allied troops in taking Messines Ridge, the loss on our side has been gratifyingly light, but the Hun losses must be appalling. The prisoners who are taken now seem to be wavering in their confidence, that their beloved Kaiser has something up his sleeve and their mighty and marvelous Hindenburg had some master stroke in readiness. All prisoners before seemed to have a certain unwavering confidence in their powers. But they are getting morally shaken and their faith is faltering. And no wonder for the British artillery has been a perfect hall, day and night, they have pounded away and given Fritzy no rest.
People at home may be inclined to judge the Allies a little hastily and find fault because the advance of our troops appears to be slow, but if they once saw the defences of our enemy, how resourceful they are, how complete they are in every detail, what a science they must have made of it, and how thorough in every respect they are, they would say the advance is marvelous. I have gone down into dugouts 60 feet deep, hastily vacated by Fritzy and they have sure made themselves comfortable. Beautiful furniture, pianos and wines of every description, of course all pillaged from neighboring towns, but more like being in a first class hotel. One asks himself the question: Did they expect to have to get out?  No, they never dreamt it was possible to be driven out.
Then, not satisfied with ruining the people’s homes, and country, they have ravaged the helpless women and girls and further degraded themselves by cutting down all fruit trees and destroying all chances of possible cultivation of the land in the vacated areas, although they had previously stolen it.
Let an of those “Milk sops” who are crying “Peace at any price” come here and see for themselves and they will sing another tune. But unless seen it really cannot be imagined. One word before I close about the spirit of our troops. On Sunday our group of battalions held some sports and although in the midst of the sports, shells were bursting a half mile away, they still carried on with the sports and with the band of the 10th Hussars playing, we had a swell time. And one word more. People in Canada seem to think we are not getting good food. Now I am speaking for myself and from experience. We at the front are getting better food that ever we got at Camp Borden, andn London, Canada, or Shoreham, England. And from what I can gather from soldiers returning from leave from England, better food than the civilians in England. Our food is better today than it was 10 weeks ago. So that is something to be thankful for.
Just as I write this, shells have begun to burst half a mile away, same place as Sunday. So Fritzy has evidently got range of our works again.  Well I hope my letter is not getting wearisome, so please tell the folks not to get impatient, the time will come for peace and that is when the Huns are finished completely and when chances of a re-occurrence of their dastardly outrages are an absolute impossibility. Otherwise it would be traitorous to those who have gone before. So will close with best wishes for a speedy but thorough victorious end of the war.
I sent my wife a cutting yesterday which will enlighten you as to what we are doing.
Yours sincerely, Sgt. Harry A. Sykes
Harry returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on February 13.  His residence on the passenger list is given as Aylmer.
Following the war, he moved to Toronto where he died on June 22, 1934, at 262 Willard Avenue at the age of 57.  He was employed as a traveler for Canada Packers Ltd.  The informant on his death registration was his son Charles. He is buried in Park Lawn cemetery, Toronto.

Harold Talbot

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Harold Talbot was born on September 2, 1896 in Chichester, Sussex, England, the son of Albert Talbot & Frances Barber. The family is found on the 1901 England census living at 121 Beggars Lane, Chichester.
Harold emigrated to Canada with his mother Frances in 1909, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Corsican,  arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on December 25. The passenger list gives their destination as Ingersoll.
Harold was a labourer living in Springfield when he enlisted for service on February 7, 1917 in London. He joined the 257th Battalion, C.E.F.  He names his next of kin as his father, Albert, of 19 Florence Road, Chichester, England.
Harold returned from overseas on December 14, 1918, arriving at St. John’s, Newfoundland.  His attestation paper states he was discharged in 1919 due to sickness.
No further information is known.

Frank Tanner

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Frank Tanner was born on March 15, 1896 at Avon in North Dorchester, the son of George Tanner (1873-1932) & Alice Serena Lyle (1875-1958).  George was the son of Mary Ann Tanner, and was farming in Malahide when he was married on March 7, 1894 in St. Thomas to Alice Lyle, of North Dorchester, the daughter of William & Mary Ann Lyle. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Frank was a farmer living in Woodstock when he enlisted for service in June 1918 in London.
He died on September 7,  1972 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 8, 1972:
FRANK E. TANNER
SPRINGFIELD – Frank Estell Tanner of RR 2 Springfield, died Thursday at his home, after a lengthy illness. He was in his 77th year. Born in North Dorchester Township, son of the late Mr and Mrs George Tanner, he resided in the district all his life. Having served in the First World War, he was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion, Col. Talbot Branch 81.
Surviving are one brother, William, of Aylmer, and a sister, Mrs. Flossie Fallowfield of Drumbo, in addition to a number of nieces and nephews. Resting at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer, for service Monday at 1:30 p.m. Interment in Aylmer cemetery.

William Tanner

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William Tanner was born on May 23, 1901 at Avon, the son of George Tanner (1873-1932) & Alice Serena Lyle (1875-1958).  George was the son of Mary Ann Tanner, and was farming in Malahide when he was married on March 7, 1894 in St. Thomas to Alice Lyle, of North Dorchester, the daughter of William & Mary Ann Lyle. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
William was a labourer living with his parents at Eastwood, Ontario when he enlisted for service on July 20, 1917 in Woodstock. He had served in the W.B.T.  He gives his date of birth as May 23, 1899, but a birth registration was found for a George Albert Clifton Tanner on May 23, 1901, son of George & Alice (Lyle) Tanner.  He names his next of kin as his father George Tanner, of Eastwood.
Following the war, he moved to Springfield and was married to Mildred Jenereaul (1908-1993).
William died on March 27, 1973. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 4, 1973:
W. G. TANNER
William George Tanner, of 17 Oak Street, Aylmer, died at the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, Tuesday, March 27, in his 72nd year.  Born at Avon, he lived in Aylmer since 1948. He was the son of the late George Tanner and the former Alice Lyle.  He is survived by his wife, the former Mildred Jenereaul, a daughter Mrs. Louis (Marilyn) Huber of Aylmer; a sister Mrs. Flossie Fallowfield of Drumbo and one granddaughter as well as a number of nieces and nephews.
Funeral was held Friday at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer. Rev. Douglas Gray of the Missionary Church officiating. Burial was in Aylmer cemetery.  The pallbearers were George Jukes, Donald Irish, Therman Legg, Clinton Kipp, Bert Mills and Charles Fick. The beautiful floral tributes were carried by Cecil Gavey and Charles McIntyre. Burial was in the Aylmer cemetery.
Relatives and friends were in attendance from Woodstock, Stoney Creek, Burford, Drumbo, Bay City Mich., London, Norwich, St. Thomas, Straffordville, Brownsville, Sarnia, Aylmer and surrounding district.

James Henry Tansley

3131963  James Henry Tansley
James Henry Tansley was born on March 13, 1892 in Yarmouth, the son of John Tansley (1841-1909) & Florence Lovisa Braddon (1866-1901).  John was a native of Yarmouth township, while Florence was born in Dunwich.  They lived at lot 17, concession 5 Yarmouth, where Florence died in 1901.
James Henry Tansley was a farmer living in Port Bruce when he enlisted for service on February 26, 1918 in London.  He names his brother Robert Tansley, c/o Will Ashton, R.R. #4 Aylmer as his next of kin.  He had served four months in the 30th Battery C.F.A. of militia.
James returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on  February 23.
James later lived in Tillsonburg and was married on January 16, 1930 to Mildred Irene Whaley (1907-2000) James died in Tillsonburg on August 22, 1972, and is buried with his wife in Tillsonburg Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, August 23, 1972:
JAMES HENRY TANSLEY
James Henry Tansley of 97 Broadway, Tillsonburg, passed away at his residence on Tuesday, August 22, 1972, in his 81st year.  A retired machinist, he was born in Yarmouth Township on March 13, 1892. He was a member of Springfield Masonic Lodge No. 259 A.F. & A.M.
Surviving are his wife, the former Mildred Whaley; one daughter, Mrs. Leon (Donna) Preston of Rexdale; two sons, William Tansley of Delhi, and Robert Tansley of Tillsonburg; four grandchildren and one sister, Mrs. William (Myrtle) McClean of Sparta.
Resting at the H. A. Ostrander and Son Funeral Home where service will be held Thursday, August 24 at p.m., conducted by Rev. Arthur Hencher of Avondale United Church. Interment in Tillsonburg Cemetery.

Robert John Tansley

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Robert Tansley was born on April 17, 1896 at Yarmouth Centre, the son of John Tansley (1841-1909) & Florence Lovisa Braddon (1866-1901).  John was a native of Yarmouth township, while Florence was born in Dunwich.  They lived at lot 17, concession 5 Yarmouth, where Florence died in 1901.
Robert was a farmer living in Aylmer when he was married on November 8, 1917 in South Dorchester to Zelpha Rose Woolley (1898-1977) of Springfield, the daughter of Harry Woolley & Ruth Rose Anger.
Robert was farming at R.R. #4 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 13, 1918 in London. He names his next of kin as his wife, and gives her address as “care of R. A. Penhale, St. Thomas”.
Robert died on October 18, 1960 and is buried with his wife in Fairview Cemetery, Dutton. His obituary appeared in the Dutton Advance, October 19, 1960:
ROBERT TANSLEY WAS WELL-KNOWN RESIDENT
The passing occurred at the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Tuesday of Robert Tansley, well-known local resident, at the age of 64 years.  He had been in hospital the past six weeks.  Born at Sparta, Mr. Tansley was the son of the late John Tansley and Florence (Braddon) Tansley.  He was a resident of Dutton for total of 16 years and had also resided at West Lorne, Essex, Brownsville and Springfield.
Mr. Tansley retired last January after 41 years with the New York Central Railway. At the time of his retirement, he was section foreman of the track department.  He was a member of Springfield Lodge, I.O.O.F., and St. John’s United Church.
Surviving are his wife, Zelpha Woolley; a daughter, Mrs. Jack (June) Cowan, Blenheim; son, Raymond, Dutton; sister, Mrs. Myrtle McLean, Sparta; a brother James Tansley of Tillsonburg and five grandchildren.  At rest at the Cyril J. Beill Funeral Home until Friday, when service will be held at 2 p.m.. Rev. C. E. Beacom will officiate with interment in Fairview Cemetery.

Harry Albert Taylor

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Harry Taylor was born on August 12, 1876 at Schroon Lake, near Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York State, the son of James & Emma Taylor.  He came to Canada about 1884 (according to the 1911 census).
Harry was living in St. Thomas, employed as a brakeman on the railroad when he was married on December 16, 1905 in Aylmer to Mary Annie Foreman (1885-1961), a native of Rainham Township, Haldimand County, living in Aylmer, the daughter of Jacob H. Foreman & Alice Stewart.
Harry & his wife are found on the 1911 census in Malahide, living with Mary’s mother Alice and her second husband Alonzo Wingrove.  They have two children, Clarice (born 1908), and Harold (born 1910).  At the time of Clarice’s birth, Harry was living at 29 Miller Street, St. Thomas.
Harry was farming when he enlisted for service on August 16, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Annie, of Aylmer.  He had served two years in the 32nd Regiment in Bruce (County?).
He went overseas in March of 1916. At some point after that, he was discharged due to chronic bronchitis. He re-enlisted in London on January 31,1918.  His address at that time was given as 119 York Street, London. It is not known if he went back overseas.  He died on November 26, 1918 in the Queen Alexandra Sanitarium at R.R. #7 London, Ont. (London Township), at the age of 43, from pulmonary tuberculosis, from which he had suffered twelve months.  His occupation on the death certificate is given as “soldier”, and he is buried in Woodland Cemetery, London. A military monument bears the following inscription: “401509 Private Harry Taylor, 33rd Battn. C.E.F. 26th Nov 1918″
Harry wrote a letter to his wife detailing his voyage overseas in 1916. It was published in the Aylmer Express, April 27, 1916:
HALIFAX TO LIVERPOOL ON S. S. LAPLAND
Descriptive Diary of Trip Across the Atlantic by Aylmer Boy
He Never Missed a Meal, Nor Was He Seasick
The voyage of S. S. Lapland with the 33rd Battalion on board from Halifax to Liverpool, has been written by Pte. H. Taylor, in diary form, and sent home to his wife. The diary follows:
St. Martin’s Camp, Shorncliffe, England
March 27, 1916
We arrived in England all safe and sound, and it seems very strange to me to come from a country where there is four feet of snow into a country where there is green grass and sheep grazing on the hills and pastures.  It is a beautiful day, but rainy and cold when we arrived. I kept a sort of diary of our trip, and will send it to you as I kept it day by day. Of course our letters may be censored, so I will be careful and not write anything that will not pass.
There is some of the grandest scenery here that I ever saw. England is a beautiful place – that is, what I have seen of it so far.  The little dinky railway coaches and cars looked funny to me compared with our large roomy coaches; but these coaches are not made for long journeys, for over here you are hardly out of one town or city when you are coming into another; in fact, coming from Liverpool to Shorncliffe, I thought we were in some town all the time, as I could see hardly any difference in the setting of the houses.  I will now start my diary and write you more about England later.
We left Quebec on the 11th March, at 10:30 for Halifax, and I can say I enjoyed every inch of the seven hundred mile trip. Arrived in Halifax at nine o’clock on the evening of the 12th. Spent the night on the train, and went on board the S. S. Lapland at 10 o’clock on the 13th.  We got a great welcome at every stop between Quebec and Halifax. At a place called Monckton, the city band met us and we had a little route march around the city. The further east you come, the more a soldier is welcomed – a great difference from Ontario’s reception of the soldiers. We also saw the wireless telegraphy plant at Newcastle, N.B., and as to grub, we were fed like kings aboard train. We left dock at about 11 o’clock, steamed a short distance out in the harbor, and anchored there until the morning of the 17th (St. Patrick’s Day).
March 17th – Set sail at 7:30, weather fine, only cold. Sea rather rough; boat rolls considerably. Quite a few taken with sea sickness when only about two hours out.  It is now six o’clock in the evening. Sea is still rough; have not as yet been sick, but expect to have my dreaded share, as I have a bad headache. We are now about one hundred miles from Halifax.  There is another ship loaded with soldiers; as yet, I do not know who they are. Battleships are escorting us; one keeps about an eighth of a mile ahead, the other about the same distance behind us. The Lapland is a passenger boat; our quarters are fine, and our food is good, substantial grub, cooked well and served to us in good style, and plenty of it.
March 18th – Last night was beautiful; the moon shone brightly and the ocean looked like a monster looking-glass. It was certainly grand, but it was that terrible grandeur which vividly brings to one the knowledge of what the sea can do. Remained on deck until 9 o’clock. We met a freighter today, about five miles away to our port side. During the night we ran into a storm, but it did not last long; it gave us an idea of what a storm would be.  Today it has been very calm, and we have rolled along very smoothly.  Tonight there is a change; it is raining and snowing. Boats in same position as last night.
March 19th (Sunday) – We had boat drill yesterday, giving us an idea of what to do in case of accident. We were about three hundred and fifty miles from Halifax last night. Today is nice and bright; sea very calm. Church service at 10 o’clock. Spent the day mostly on deck. The 45th Band gave a concert at the bow of the boat this afternoon. Nothing in sight but blue above and blue below.  We are not about seven hundred miles from Halifax.
March 20th – Weather fine, sea calm. Ships in about the same position.  The name of the other ship is the Metagama. Boat drill today at 9:45 and 2 o’clock. Over one thousand miles from Halifax. Expect to be coming into the danger zone some time tomorrow.
March 21st – Sea still calm. The battleship which escorted us from Halifax turned back for Canadian shores and another battleship from Britain picked us up. The change was made about noon, with bands playing. We are now about fourteen hundred miles from Halifax. This is one of the most beautiful nights I ever experienced – a calm, moonlight night on mid-ocean. Time, midnight, and I guess I am the only one on deck, except the guards and night crew.  The sea looks like gold. We are now in the danger zone, and a sharp lookout is kept for those little fellows, the submarines. Sighted a sailing ship today about twelve miles away. Have not as yet been sick nor missed a meal.
March 22nd – Has been very rough today, and showery but it was grand to stand on deck at the bow and watch the good old ship ride on the waves. Our battleships did considerable scouting on either side of us today. We are now in the danger zone proper. About eighteen hundred miles from Halifax, and about three days’ run from England. Very rough tonight. We are crossing what is known as the Devil’s Hole, and I guess the old fellow is wrathy over something tonight.
March 23rd – No one allowed on deck last night after sunset. Sea very rough. One man nearly blown overboard.  Sea more settled this morning. Ran into a gale about noon, but it did not last long. Sea calm tonight. We sighted a strange steamer today, and when our escort signalled her, could get no answer. When she started towards her to investigate, she soon showed her colors. The battleship looks like a big bristling bear, with guns sticking out from all sides. We are now eighteen hundred miles from Halifax and six hundred from the Irish coast.  As yet, we do not know which port we are headed for.  Had a concert on board last night. The chief steward gave us a sort of blow-out of a dinner – chicken, pudding, ice cream, etc.  Have not missed a meal yet, nor been the least bit sick.
March 24th – We are coming into the most dangerous part of the war zone. Have been travelling in a zigzag course all day. Three torpedo boats met us at two o’clock, which makes us feel considerably safer. We passed over the grave of the Lusitania today about five o’clock. We are now in the Irish Sea, with the coast plainly in sight – the first land seen in eight days. Wearing our lifebelts all the time – even take them to our meals. Only about twelve hours’ run from Liverpool. All cabin doors ordered opened and fastened tonight. We have left the other ship and her escort away behind, and we are beating it at about 21 knots an hour for – don’t know where, as yet. Sea very calm tonight.
March 25th – Went on deck this morning, to find one torpedo boat and battleship gone; had left us in the night. The Metagama out of sight. Can see the coast of Wales. All kinds of boats now on all sides of us – fishing smacks in plenty. Coming into the harbor at Liverpool. Picked up our pilot about half an hour ago. We got a great reception – whistles blowing from ships in harbor and cheers from people aboard them. Docked at 9:45 p.m. and boarded our trains. Left Liverpool at 11 o’clock, and arrived at Shorncliffe at 8 a.m. on March 26th. Marched immediately to St. Martin’s Plains, our camp.
Journey complete.  You begin to see the signs of war now – no lights in towns and cities at night. Camp also dark at nights. No great sight to see aeroplanes here in abundance.
Harry’s widow Mary continued to live in London, but moved to Aylmer in the 1920s. She died in 1961 at the age of 76, and is buried with her husband in Woodland Cemetery.  They had a son Harold who predeceased his mother, and a daughter, Mrs. Clarice Marsh.

Henry Temple

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Henry Temple was born on March 2, 1889 in Port Burwell, the son of Arthur Temple (1867-1946) & Susannah Margaret Carr Eveland (1869-1971). Arthur was the son of Oliver Temple & Hannah Eveland.  Susannah was the daughter of John Eveland & Elivra Williams.
The family is found on the 1891 and 1901 census in Bayham.  By 1911, they had moved to Port Stanley. Arthur & Margaret are buried in Union cemetery, Yarmouth township.
Henry was a fisherman living at Port Stanley with his parents when he enlisted for service on December 22, 1915 in St. Thomas. He had served one year in the 39th Regiment militia.  He enlisted with the 91st Battalion.
Henry returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Portland, Maine on May 30.
When his brother Walter died in 1954, Henry was living in Port Credit.  By 1958, he was living in Port Dover.  He later lived in Port Stanley.
Henry died on January 6, 1964 and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, London. The inscription on his marker reads: “Henry Temple, Private, 91 Battn. C.E.F. 5 Jan 1964, age 74″
His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, January 7, 1964:
HENRY TEMPLE DIES IN HOSPITAL
LONDON, Ont. – Henry Temple, formerly of Port Stanley, died yesterday at Westminster Hospital, London, Ont., in his 75th year. He was a retired fisherman.  He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Susanna Temple, of St. Thomas; and two sisters, Mrs. Florence Flynn of Dearborn, Mich.; and Mrs. Beatrice Robbins, of St. Louis, Mo.
Resting at the Oatman Funeral Home here, and the funeral service will be held at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, at St. Luke’s Chapel of Westminster Hospital. Interment will be made in Woodland Cemetery, London.

Walter Temple

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Walter Temple was born on November 20, 1897 in Port Burwell,   the son of Arthur Temple (1867-1946) & Susannah Margaret Carr Eveland (1869-1971).  Arthur was the son of Oliver Temple & Hannah Eveland.  Susannah was the daughter of John Eveland & Elivra Williams.
The family is found on the 1891 and 1901 census in Bayham.  By 1911, they had moved to Port Stanley. Arthur & Margaret are buried in Union cemetery, Yarmouth township.
Walter was a fisherman living at Port Stanley with his parents when he enlisted for service on December 28, 1917 in London. He joined the 63rd Depot Battery, C.F.A., C.E.F.
Walter returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on August 24.
He died in Chatham on February 6, 1954 and is buried in Union cemetery. The inscription on his monument reads:
“Veterans Guard of Canada Pte. Walter Temple 1897-1954″
His obituary from an undated clipping:
ERIEAU MAN BURIED IN UNION CEMETERY
ERIEAU – Walter Temple, well-known Erieau fisherman, died Saturday, February 6, in Chatham Public General hospital, following a week’s illness.  Born at Port Burwell, he was the son of the late Arthur Temple and Margaret Eveland of London, Ont.  He was a veteran of World War I, having served overseas in the 91st Battalion.
Surviving are: his mother; three brothers, Henry of Port Credit; Bill and Reginald of Port Burwell; two sisters, Mrs. Florence Sands and Mrs. Lewis Robbins (Beatrice), both of Detroit; and one step-sister, Mrs. Kenneth Resech (Patricia) of Chatham.
Mr. Temple was resting at the Needham-Ford Funeral Home, Blenheim, where services were conducted on Tuesday.  Interment was in Union cemetery.

William Arthur Temple

189941  William Arthur Temple
photo courtesy of Elgin County Archives
William Temple was born on September 23, 1892 in Port Burwell, the son of Arthur Temple (1867-1946) & Susannah Margaret Carr Eveland (1869-1971). Arthur was the son of Oliver Temple & Hannah Eveland.  Susannah was the daughter of John Eveland & Elivra Williams.
The family is found on the 1891 and 1901 census in Bayham.  By 1911, they had moved to Port Stanley. Arthur & Margaret are buried in Union cemetery, Yarmouth township.
William was living in Port Stanley when he was married on December 23, 1913 in Port Burwell to Harriet Melissa Armstrong, of Bayham, the daughter of John Armstrong & Sarah Brandow.  Harriet died in St. Clair County, Michigan.
William was a fisherman living in Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on February 1, 1916 in St. Thomas.
At letter from William to his sister appeared in the St. Thomas Daily Times, April 9, 1916:
PTE. TEMPLE HAS TO WHISTLE NOW
Loss of His Voice Makes This Necessary When He Wants Anything But He is Still Cheerful
Miss Florence Temple, of Port Burwell has received a letter from her brother, William, who is now in the hospital in France.  A dose of poison gas sent him to “Blighty.”  Pte. Temple is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Temple, now of Port Stanley, and was a Port Burwell boy who went over with the 1st.
“Just a few lines to let you know how I am and where I am.  Hope these lines will find you in good health as it leave me not in the best.  I am in England in the hospital.  I came from France on leave the 2nd of January and caught a bad cold also got gassed before I left the trenches and two days after I got over here I lost my voice and haven’t been able to speak above a whisper and my lungs bother me a great deal but I feel much better now than when I first came in.  They make me stay in bed all the time and if I want to say anything to anyone I have to write it on paper.  But of course when the sisters are out I get the best of them.  I whisper.  Ha, Ha!  But say sis, it’s an awful way to be.  If I want anyone I have to whistle and make motions.  But don’t let it worry you any for not doubt I’ll get my voice back one of these fine days and believe me it is much better here in the hospital, if I can’t speak, than it is in the trenches.  You can’t imagine what it is like out there laying in the mud and water and nearly frozen.  It’s a wonder I’m not dead.  I didn’t think I’d ever stand it, as long as I have and then it’s a strain on one’s mind.  Shells screaming over your head and you don’t know what minute one will drop on you.  And doing sentry work out in no man’s land perhaps in an old house that has been hammered to pieces or else in a shell hold and don’t know what minute Fritz is going to dive into your.  I didn’t mind it while I was in the trenches but since I got in hospital and have had time to think of the close calls I’ve had, it makes my blood run cold.  One would never suppose that you could have such close calls and never get a scratch.  But as you say, God is good, and He’s sure been more than good to me.”
William returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 30.
He drowned at Port Stanley in August 1958 and is buried in Union Cemetery.  Notice of his death was reported in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, in four articles:
August 28, 1958:
BODY FOUND SEEK IDENTITY
Port Stanley, August 28 – The body of an unidentified man was pulled from the water at King George Lift bridge here this morning.  Found on the body described as that of a middle-aged man was a picking out hook used by fishermen to get fish from a net. A group of boys crossing the bridge at 7:30 noticed the body in the water.  Provincial Police said they have no report of any fishermen missing and do not believe it is anyone from the area.  Investigation is continuing.
August 28, 1958:
FIND BODY FLOATING IN CREEK
Port Stanley (Staff) – Identification of a body found floating in the Kettle Creek north of the harbor lift bridge in Port Stanley early this morning is expected to be made sometime this afternoon. O.P.P. Constable Alan J. Weekes, who is investigating the discovery of the drowned man, stated this at noon today. Fisherman Dick Payne, of Port Stanley, found the body about 7 a.m. and brought it to the shore. He then called police.  Thought to be a young, well-built person, the drowned man had a net-mending needle in the pocket of the grey trousers he was wearing, leading to the speculation that he was a fisherman. There is a possibility that he is a resident of Port Burwell.
August 29, 1958:
LEARN IDENTIFY OF CREEK VICTIM
Port Stanley – The body of the man found in Kettle Creek today near the King George VI Lift Bridge has been identified as that of William Arthur Temple, about 68, of Port Burwell.  OPP Constable Alan Weekes of Port Stanley, said the body was believed to have been in the water about a week, but there was no evidence of foul play.  Constable Weekes said it was believed Mr. Temple had been fishing. A “picking out hook” used for fishing was found on the body when it was discovered at 7:30 a.m. by a group of boys, crossing the bridge.  Survivors include a son Lawrence, and Mr. Temple’s mother Mrs. Susanna Temple, a resident of Tweedsmuir Hall London
August 29, 1958:
TEMPLE
William Arthur Temple, Port Burwell, retired fisherman, dear son of Mrs. Susanna Temple, London; dear father of Lawrence Temple, Port Burwell and Mrs. Rose Soper, St. Clair, Mich. Dear brother of Henry Temple, Port Dover, and Reginald of Port Burwell; passed away suddenly at Port Stanley, age 66 years.  The funeral service took place from the P. R. Williams and Son Funeral Home on Thursday. Interment was made in the Union cemetery.

Roy Welter Thayer

334534  Roy Thayer
Roy Thayer was born on August 28, 1892 at Dunboyne in Malahide, the son of George Edgar Thayer (1866-1934) & Bertha Adelia Welter (1865-1929).  George was born in Malahide, the son of Jarvis Thayer & Elizabeth Chambers, and was married on December 17, 1884 in Malahide, to Bertha Welter, the daughter of William Welter & Elizabeth Dingman.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Roy was a merchant living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on May 21, 1917 in London.  He had belonged to the 30th Battery for 1 ½ years.
A letter from Roy was printed in the Aylmer Express, May 9, 1918:
GUNNER R. W. THAYER SAYS THIS WAR IS A YOUNG MAN’S GAME
Writes From France that England is now calling up to 50 and 55 years of age
Says very little food is grown in France, so Canada must help make this up
France, April 13, 1918
Dear Father –
Your letter of March 6th received and was very pleased to hear from you. It’s the first letter I have had since coming to France, which is nearly a month now. I hear that a lot of the boys at home will be called tot he colors soon. Well, if we expect to bring this war to a successful conclusion they will all have to come. I see by the papers that England is calling up her men up to 50 and in some cases 55. I cannot see what good they will be out here for this is a young man’s game. It is hard enough for us to stand it at times, so I cannot see how they expect the older ones to be of much use.
Canadian farmers should make some money this year for there isn’t much farming in this part of France and the food has to come from some place.  I see that the Massey-Harris Co. are popular in France as well as in Canada. Out in the yard by our billet there are two Massey-Harris binders, and I have seen a number around different parts of the country. Tell mother that I just received the second box she sent and it was in pretty bad shape, and if it is possible at all to next time send a tin box.
I am feeling fine and have had some pretty interesting times already. Will have to close for this time. Love to all, Roy
Gunner R. W. Thayer, No. 334534, France
A letter to Roy’s parents was printed in the Aylmer Express, August 22, 1918:
GUNNER R. W. THAYER IS STILL IN HOSPITAL
One of the most important and very usual branches of the Canadian Red Cross Society is the Bureau of Information. This is a branch of the work that perhaps does not receive the publicity it deserves, but nevertheless is surely doing a great work and is appreciated most perhaps by the mothers and near relatives of the brave boys who are sick and wounded, and lying in the hospitals in England and France after doing their bit in the front lines. The following letter received by Mr and Mrs Edgar Thayer, from London, England, gives a splendid idea of the work of this branch of the Red Cross:
“I beg to inform you that Gnr. R. W. Thayer, No. 334543 [sic], 5th Canadians, has been admitted to the Military Hospital, Herne Bay, Kent, England, suffering from an attack of trench fever and influenza. He has been seen by our Red Cross visitor, who reports to us that he is now very much better, but still gets a temperature at night, so still has to remain in bed.  He says he is quite happy and comfortable and I hope will make a good recovery. He will be visited regularly and should he be in need of any comforts other than those supplied by the Hospital, we will gladly send them to him from our Parcels Office.
Yours truly, (Mrs.) B. Neasterton Smith”
A photo of Roy and the following caption appeared in the Aylmer Express, November 21, 1918:
“Gunner R. W. Thayer, of the firm of C. & R.W. Thayer, Aylmer, who has been on leave after suffering from trench fever. He visited London and Glasgow, and is enjoying a well earned rest.”
Roy returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 30.
Following the war, he moved to London where he was operated a furniture business,  living at 173 Wharncliffe Rd, when he was married in St. Thomas on August 28, 1924 to Lulu Margaret Campbell (1897-1982), of 42 Metcalfe Street, St. Thomas, daughter of Nathan Campbell & Jennie Sloane. Following their marriage, Roy & Lulu lived at 47 Victor Street, London.
Roy died at 923 Waterloo Street, London on April 5, 1932 at the age of 39.  He and his wife, and son David M. (1928-1983) are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
A notice of his death, accompanied by a photograph, appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, April 11, 1932:
WAR VETERAN WAS SUDDENLY CALLED
Roy Welter Thayer, son of Mr and Mrs G. E. Thayer, Aylmer, and husband of the former Miss Lulu Campbell, St. Thomas, died in London, Ont., last week, very suddenly. Mr. Thayer, who ran a gents’ furnishings store, was a veteran of the World War. He enlisted in the Canadian Forces on May 21, 1916, as a gunner in the Artillery. He embarked at St. John’s with the 63rd Battery in December the following year and went to France on March 20, 1918.  He was gassed and also suffered from trench fever. He was invalided to England in June and returned to Canada on December 30, 1918.
Another account of his passing appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 7, 1932:
SUDDEN DEATH OF ROY W. THAYER
London Business Man Succumbed to Heart Attack. Was Former Aylmer Citizen
Roy Welter Thayer, one of London’s prominent business men, of Thayer’s Men’s Furnishing Store, died at noon on Tuesday, April 5th, following a sudden heart attack which he suffered in his store.  Mr. Thayer went to work as usual in the morning, but was taken ill about 11:30 o’clock.  He was able to drive his own car home, however. He died at his home. A week or so ago, Mr. Thayer had had an attack of influenza and about a year ago was in the hospital some weeks, seriously ill.
Before going to London, Mr. Thayer had been in business in Aylmer. He was born in Aylmer and attended the Aylmer schools. He was in his 40th year. In 1920 he went to London and had been successfully engaged in the men’s furnishing business ever since.  He was a member of Metropolitan Church, and active in many business circles in London.
Deceased is survived by his widow and a family of four young children; also by his father, G. E. Thayer, of Aylmer; one sister, Mrs. Earl T. Peckham, and a brother, Carl Thayer, both of London.
Rev. Dr. Bruce Hunter will officiate at the funeral service to be conducted at the George E. Logan Funeral Home, London, at 2 o’clock on Friday afternoon. Interment will be in the Aylmer Cemetery.

Charles Herbert Thomas

190276  Charles Herbert Thomas
Charles Thomas was born on April 27, 1884 in Aylmer, the son of George Riley Thomas (1857-1899) & Mary Ellen Scanlan (1854-1924).  George was born in Bayham, the son of Benjamin Thomas & Elizabeth Samantha Westover, and was farming there when he was married on October 10, 1874 at Straffordville to Mary E. Scanlan, also of Bayham, daughter of James Scanlan & Rachel LeBar.  George & Mary are buried in Straffordville Cemetery. He died in 1899 at lot 8, concession 2, Bayham.
Charles was living in St. Thomas employed as a bookkeeper when he enlisted for service on April 15, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mary Thomas, of R.R. #3 Shedden.
A photo of Charles appeared in the St. Thomas Journal, May 26, 1917 with the following caption:
FORMER FROME MAN BACK IN TRENCHES
Pte. Charles Herbert Thomas, who enlisted with the 91st, and who has returned to the trenches after having been discharged from hospital in England where he underwent an operation for appendicitis last November.  Pte. Thomas is a son of Mr and Mrs George H. Thomas, of Frome, formerly of Springfield.
When his mother died in 1924, Charles was living in Philadelphia. The 1930 census for Bridgeton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania shows a Charles H. Thomas, age 37 (born 1893), a poultry farmer.  He was single, and had emigrated to the United States in 1923. This may be the above Charles Thomas.
Charles also lived in Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania, and later moved to Malabar, Melbourne, Florida where he died on February 6, 1945.  He is buried in Melbourne Cemetery, Brevard County,  Florida.

“Frank”  Henry Ward Thomas

331925
Henry Ward Thomas was born on June 1, 1881 at Corinth, the son of Henry Thomas & Phoebe Evaline Pound (1845-1933).  Henry Thomas Sr., was the son of Thomas & Elizabeth Thomas, and was living in Malahide when he was married on October 30, 1862 to Evaline Pound, also of Malahide, daughter of John Pound & Athelia Ward.  The family is found on the 1891 Malahide census, but by 1901 had moved to Euphemia Township, Lambton County.  Evaline Thomas died in 1933 in Windsor and is buried in Greenlawn cemetery there.
“Frank” moved to Alberta, where he is found on the 1911 census in Medicine Hat, with his wife Maggie and daughter Ada (born 1910). He later  moved to Lethbridge, Alberta.  He enlisted there under the name “Frank Henry Thomas” on May 18, 1916 with the 61st Battalion, 15th Overseas Brigade.  He was a barber, and names his next of kin as his wife, Margaret Ellen Thomas, of 1309 9th Avenue South, Lethbridge. No further information is known.

Ainley Stewart Thompson

3137594
Ainley Thompson was born on May 29, 1892 in Aylmer, the son of Rev. G. J. Ainley Thompson (1861-1941) & Emmeline Stevely (1861-1926).  There is record of a Dr. Thompson being minister of Knox Presbyterian Church in Aylmer from 1891 to 1894.  Ainley & Emmeline are buried in Woodland Cemetery.  The monument indicates he was a Medical Doctor.
Ainley Thompson was employed as an office clerk living with his parents at 156 Elmwood Ave., London when he enlisted for service on May 31, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his father, Dr. Ainley Thompson of the same address.
Ainley Thompson was living in London when he was married on August 27, 1919 in Dutton to Ellinor Corneil Black, daughter of Daniel Black & Ellen Poole.

George Carr Thompson

3133095
George Thompson was born on August 29, 1896 in Perth, Scotland, the son of George & Elizabeth Thompson.  The family is found on the 1901 Scotland census, living at 156 High Street, Perth Middle Church parish, in the town of Perth, Perthshire.
George emigrated to Canada in 1914, sailing from Glasgow on the ship Grampian, arriving in Quebec on May 4. The passenger list states he had been employed as a painter, and was going to his married sister in Aylmer, Ontario, where he intends to be a farm labourer.
George was a shoe operator living on Sydenham Street in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 15, 1918 in London.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Elizabeth Thompson, of 146 High Street, Perth, Scotland. No further information can be found.

John Gordon Thompson

37301
John Gordon Thompson was born on January 2, 1894 in Aylmer, the son of Rev. G. J. Ainley Thompson (1861-1941) & Emmeline Stevely (1861-1926) .  There is record of a Dr. Thompson being minister of Knox Presbyterian Church in Aylmer from 1891 to 1894. Ainley & Emmeline are buried in Woodland Cemetery.  The monument indicates he was a Medical Doctor.
John was a employed as a clerk when he enlisted for service on September 24, 1914 at Valcartier.  He names his next of kin as Dr. G. A. Thompson of 156 Elmwood Ave., London.  He had served in the 7th Regiment, London.
He died on December 28, 1982 and is buried with his wife Essie Kathleen (1897-1979) in Woodland Cemetery, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, December 30, 1982:
THOMPSON
At University Hospital, on Tuesday, December 28th, 1982, John Gordon Thompson, in his 89th year. Beloved husband of the late Essie K. Thompson and father of James and Essie (Mrs. Stanley Bacon) both of London. Survived by eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Friends may call at the family residence, “Headley” on Thursday between the hours of 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Family service on Friday with Archdeacon J. Roy Beynon officiating. Interment Woodland Cemetery. Donations may be made if desired to the Y.M./Y.W.C.A. Building Fund.

Theodore Austin Thompson

675055
Theodore Thompson was born on February 28, 1897 in Springfield, the son of William Thompson (1870-1958) & Minnie Clark (1871-1934).  William was born in Dereham township, the son of William Seth & Ellen Thompson, and was living there when he was married on February 26, 1896 in Brownsville to Minnie Clark, a native of Hamilton living in St. Thomas, daughter of Jane Clark. William & Minnie are buried in Dorchester Union Cemetery.
Theodore was living at Mossley employed as a bridgeman when he enlisted for service on January 6, 1916 in Woodstock.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Minnie, of Mossley.  A notation was made to change her address to Ingersoll.  He had served with the 22nd Oxford Rifles.
Theodore returned from overseas on May 22, 1919, arriving in Halifax. Following the war, he was employed as a machinist in Ingersoll when he was married on December 9, 1919 in Woodstock to Clara Elizabeth Victoria Brooks, a native of Leceister, England living in Woodstock, the daughter of Thomas William Brooks & Mary Elizabeth Linnell.
No further information is known.

Lieut. Herbert Ernest Thomson  Herbert Thomson

Herbert Thomson was born on October 17, 1894 in Yarmouth township, the son of John D. Thomson (1841-1912) & Esther Sarah Fowler (1849-1934).  John was born in Yarmouth, the son of Donald Thomson & Flora McGregor, and was farming in Yarmouth when he was married there on December 2, 1869 to Sarah Fowler, also of Yarmouth, the daughter of Thomas Fowler & Elizabeth Doolittle.  The family is found on the 1901 and 1911 census in South Dorchester township. Sarah was living at R.R. #1 Kingsmill in South Dorchester in the 1920s. She and her husband are buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Ave.
No attestation paper can be found for Herbert.  The following article states he enlisted in London, Ontario in April 1917.
An article about Herbert appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 25, 1918:
FORMER MAPLETON MAN MAY BE PRISONER OF WAR IN GERMANY
Strong hopes are held on that Flight-Lieut. Herbert E. Thomson, son of Mrs. Sarah Thomson, and the late John D. Thomson, Mapleton, is a prisoner of war in Germany. An encouraging letter has been received from Major “Billy” Bishop, V.C., Lieut. Thomson’s superior officer. Lieut. Thomson is spoken of as one of the most popular and daring flyers in Major Bishop’s famous air circus. The young aviator was a medical student in London before enlistment. He is a graduate of the Aylmer collegiate. Besides his mother, he has two sisters, Mrs. Herbert Brown, of Springfield, and Mrs. A. E. Charlton, Mapleton, and four brothers, Daniel J., and J. F., of Belmont; Dr. T. L., of Des Moines, Iowa; and Dr. George, Springfield, Ont.
Major Bishop’s Letter
The letter of Major Bishop, the famous Canadian Ace, to Mrs. Thomson, mother of the Mapleton hero, is as follows:
“Dear Mrs. Thomson – I am terribly sorry to have to tell you that your son is missing. We have good reasons for believing that he is unhurt and is a prisoner. Yesterday noon he was detailed to lead a party of four machines over the lines to fire at some transports on a road. This necessitated them going very low down to six hundred feet, and your son whilst performing this most gallant and dangerous duty, for some reason, was forced to land. One of those with him, Lieut. Trapp, saw him glide down into field and attempt to land properly, thereby I think proving that it was his machine damaged and your son unhurt. The machine turned partly over on its back in lowering, as the ground was full of shell holes. But a crash like that would not even jar the pilot in one of these machines. He is the greatest loss tome and my squadron. A wonderful pilot, a brave lad, he was popular with all and we feel it very deeply. Please accept mine and the squadron’s sympathy.
Yours sincerely, W. A. Bishop.”
Letter from Lieut. Thomson
A letter written by Flight-Lieut. Thomson on June 14 and addressed to his brother, includes the following: “Well, to start off with, I cannot tell you where I am, but I am close to where I was before. When the squadron first came over there were just a few of us did patrols. Well, I was fortunate enough to be one of the few. The first scrap we had there were fourteen Huns and six of us, and we got in rather a hot scrap. We got four of them and we all got back. I did not get any, but got a few shots at some of them. The next scrap I was in was with Major Bishop and another fellow against eight. We managed to get four of them. The major got two and I got two, but one of mine was not officially counted as it was not seen by another pilot. The last scrap we had was almost on our side of the lines, but did not have much excitement that time, as my engine did not sound any too good, so stayed on this side of the line, as I as not overly keen on spending the rest of the war in Germany. But we very seldom go far over so that if our machines cut up we can glide back on our side of the line. I never felt better in my life.”
Joined Service Last Year
Lieut. Thomson enlisted in April, 1917 in London, Ont. He received all his training in England and went to France, January 26, 1918. After six weeks spent there he was recalled as an instructor, only to go over again with Major Bishop.
An article in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, August 21, 1918 contains a photo of Lieut. Herbert E. Thomson, R.A.F., of Mapleton, and a letter to his mother from a German prisoner of war camp.
MAPLETON OFFICER WRITES FROM FOE PRISON CAMP
Lieut. Herbert E. Thomson, R.A.F., who was recently captured by the Germans, writes as follows to his mother at Mapleton:
“Dear Mother – Well, you see I have changed my address once more, but it could have been a lot worse, for I have not been hurt in the least, and we are in very clean places, and are out for a walk every day. We are treated as officers and get a fair amount to eat.  There is an English Red Cross lady who comes in to see us twice a week.  I was leading a patrol of four on some special low work, and a lucky shot hit my engine. It was from the ground. It was the only one that hit the machine, and somehow or other it hit the right place.  There are several R.A.F. fellows over here and some I know quite well, so it makes it rather better.  We will be moved into Germany soon.  How long after you heard I was missing was it before you heard I was a prisoner?  I will be allowed to write one letter a week.  I want you to let everyone read this.  I will not be able to write to Lew.  Hope John and Daniel are better by now. Do not worry, as everything is likely for the best, and I will be sure of getting home now, at some time. I also want some one to write to my commanding officer and give my address to Mrs. Hunter. There is another fellow here by the name of Thomson.  He is an American.  My address is on the outside. Lots of love, “Herb”.  Here is the address: Kriegsgafengenenlager, Officer 2nd Lieut. Herbert Ernest Thomson, R.A.F., Karlsruhe, Germany”.
Herbert was married in 1926 to Sara Hester McIntyre (1902-1968), daughter of Lachlan McIntyre.  He died on May 5, 1970 and is buried with his wife in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Ave. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 13, 1970:
HERBERT E. THOMSON
A lieutenant in Billy Bishop’s famed Flying Circus in the First World War who had been in ailing health for the last year died Tuesday of last week in Westminster Hospital, London.
Herbert E. Thomson, 75, RR 1 Kingsmill, was an elder and member of the Church of Christ Disciples, Mapleton, and a member of the Belmont Masonic Lodge No. 190, A.F. and A.M., and the Royal Canadian Legion.
He was born in North Yarmouth, but resided in South Dorchester from 1900-31. He returned to farm in North Yarmouth after that period.  Son of the late Mr and Mrs John D. Thomson of North Yarmouth and South Dorchester, he was predeceased by his wife, the former Sara McIntyre, who died Dec. 25, 1968, and six brothers and one sister.
He is survived by his sister, Mrs. Herb (Mabel) Brown, of RR 1 Kingsmill, and a number of nieces and nephews.  Rested at the Williams Funeral Home, St. Thomas, for service Friday afternoon with Rev. Lorne Nethercott of the Church of Christ Disciples, Mapleton, officiating.  Interment in St. Thomas Cemetery. The pallbearers were Colin Berry, Joe Howey, Clarence Bailey, Stanley Marr, Douglas Legg and Lorne McNeil. Acting as floral bearers were William Free Jr., Walter Moore, Stuart Helka, Max Zavitz, Ted Garton, Charles Drake and Beverly Finch.
Relatives and friends were in attendance from Detroit, London, Guelph, Highgate, Springfield, Avon, Tillsonburg, Hamilton, Harrietsville, Glanworth, Aylmer, St. Thomas and district.

Laurence Murray Thomson

3138437
Laurence Thomson was born on March 10, 1897 in Houghton Township, Norfolk County, the son of Thomas Clifford Thomson (1871-1945) & Annie Kneval (1870-1944).  Thomas was born in London, the son of Thomas & Louisa Thomson, and was farming in Houghton when he was married there on April 29, 1896 to Annie Kneval, of Houghton, the daughter of Frederick & Mary Kneval.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Laurence was a farmer living with his parents at Port Burwell when he enlisted for service on June 13, 1918 in London.
He died in 1979 and is buried with his wife Mary E. Brown (1901-1989) in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Robert Gordon Thomson

333847
Robert Gordon Thomson was born on May 24, 1876 in London, the son of Thomas Thomson & Rosena Jane Ringe.  Thomas Thomson was born in Forfarshire, Scotland in 1827, and was a farmer in Bayham Township.  He died at the age of 52 years on September 7, 1889 in Bayham.  Clinton’s mother, Rosina was born in London, England on Dec. 18, 1847, the daughter of Peter Ringe & Elizabeth Jones. She died in Chicago, Illinois on January 11, 1913 at the age of 64.  She was no doubt living there with one of her children, but her death was registered in Aylmer.  Thomas & Rosina are buried in Aylmer cemetery. Robert’s brother, Clinton Charles Edward Thomson was killed in action on April 29, 1917.
Robert Thomson was a farmer living in Aylmer when he was married there on October 19, 1905 to Charlotte Agnes Selley (1884-1951), also of Aylmer, but born in Wardsville, the daughter of William Selley & Emily Sarah Sanders.
Robert enlisted for service on April 7, 1916 in Guelph.  He had served in the 30th Battery C.F.A.
Robert died on June 26, 1956 in Windsor, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary, from an undated clipping, follows:
R. G. (BERT) THOMSON DIES IN WINDSOR
Aylmer – A former well-known resident of the Aylmer district, R. G. (Bert) Thomson, died on Tuesday morning at the Riverview Hospital, Windsor. He had been ill for the past ten weeks.  Born in London, Ont., 80 years ago, Mr. Thomson lived for 70 years in the Aylmer district where he was a farmer. He served overseas in World War I with the 63rd Battery, Royal Canadian Artillery. He was a member of Trinity Anglican Church, Aylmer, and the Colonel Talbot Branch 81 of the Canadian Legion. His wife, the former Charlotte Selley, died in 1951.
He is survived by two sons, Marshall, of Windsor, and Dyle, of Toronto; two daughters, Mrs. Pauline Hallbom, Salt Lake City, Utah; and Miss Phyllis Thomson, of North Bay; two brothers, Morris, of Windsor; and David, of Shedden; four sisters, Mrs. Janet Winters, Oak Park, Ill.; Mrs. Alice Robbins, Windsor; the Misses Jessie and Cornelis Thomson, both of Oak Park, Ill.; and seven grandchildren.
The body will rest from noon until Wednesday at the James H. Barnum Funeral Home, Aylmer, from where service will be held on Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Rev. T. Dale Jones, of Trinity Anglican Church, will officiate. Interment will be made in the family plot at the Aylmer Cemetery.

 John Francis Thorne

782047
John Thorne was born on July 25, 1889 in Wallaceburg, the son of Jesse Thorne, a cabinet maker, & Elizabeth Twigg. The family is found on the 1901 census in Thamesville, Kent County. By 1911, John had moved to South Dorchester, where he was working as a domestic servant for George & Edith Hall.
He later moved to Hearne, Saskatchewan where he was a farmer.  He enlisted for service with the 128th Battalion on January 21, 1916 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Mrs. A. C. Winter, of Springfield.  She was Zara Elizabeth Sophia Thorne, who married Austin Carlisle Winter in 1900.  She later married Fred Martin and died in Springfield in 1959.
John returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on January 25.  He is not listed as a survivor in Mrs. Fred Martin’s obituary in 1959.
No further information is known.

Louis Elmer Thurston

3109736
Louis Thurston was born on July 14, 1893 at Straffordville, the son of Edward Thurston (1867-1947) & Jennie Defoe (1876-1955).  Edward was born in Bayham, the son of Jared & Mariah Thurston, and was married there on March 22, 1893 to Jennie Defoe, a native of Bay City, Michigan living in Bayham, the daughter of Charles & Everdite Defoe.  They are buried in Smuck cemetery.
Louis was a farmer and locomotive fireman living at Straffordville when he enlisted for service on May 10, 1918 in Hamilton.
Louis was married to Lulu Moore (1902-1979).  He died in 1972 and is buried with his wife in Smuck cemetery.

Gerald Tighe

84193
Gerald Tighe was born on October 21, 1895 in Birmingham, Warwickshire, England, the son of John Tighe & Hannah Louisa Ford.  The family is found on the 1901 census at 101 Ashted Road, Birmingham.  John was a surgeon and was a native of Ireland; while his wife Hannah was born in Bradford, Yorkshire.
Gerald emigrated to Canada in 1914, arriving in Quebec on May 12.  A passenger list states his destination is Aylmer, and he intends to be a fruit farmer. His name is found in a list of recruits printed in the Aylmer Express, November 14, 1914, described as a farmer, of Aylmer.
Gerald enlisted for service on November 17, 1914.  He names his next of kin as his father, John Tighe of 101 Ashted Row, Birmingham, England.  His occupation is given as a clerk.
Passenger lists indicate that Gunner G. Tighe was invalided home to Aylmer, and arrived in Halifax on November 14, 1917.  He was married in Aylmer on December 13, 1918 to Bernice Isabella Emmett (1898-1976), also of Aylmer, the daughter of Charles Emmett & Alfretta Marlow. Gerald’s occupation on the marriage record is given as bookkeeper. They had at least one child, Geraldine.  Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 19, 1918:
A very pretty social event occurred on Friday morning, December 13th, when Bernice Isabel, only daughter of Mr and Mrs Charles Emmett, of this place, was united in marriage to Mr. Gerald Tighe, son of the late Dr. Tighe, of Birmingham, England. The interesting ceremony took place at St. John’s church, St. George street, at 10 o’clock, and was performed by Rev. Father West. The bride looked charming in a gown of silk crepe de chene and wore a veil and wreath of orange blossoms. She carried a vellum prayer book and a Rosary, the gifts of Father West. Mr. J. P. Coyle, manager of the Carnation Milk Products Co., was best man and Mrs. Coyle, matron of honor. After the ceremony, Mrs. Will Saunders, of St. Thomas, sang very sweetly, “Oh Promise Me”. The bride was the recipient of some very beautiful gifts. A coincidence in the event is that the bride was born, baptized and married on the same spot where St. John’s church now stands. After the wedding ceremony the guests, who numbered about fifty, repaired to the home of the bride’s parents where a very dainty luncheon was served by young friends of the bride: Misses Edna and Beatrice Boettinger, Virginia Stevenson, Elizabeth Grieve, Cora Banghart and Mr. Mortin Young. The happy couple left amid showers of confetti on No. 37 M.C.R. for Detroit. Upon their return they will take up their residence with the bride’s parents. The groom has a good position in the office of the Carnation Products Co.
Bernice is buried in Aylmer cemetery with her brother Harry Emmett, but Gerald’s name is not on the monument.

Leslie Norman Todman

53744
The name Leslie Todman is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916.
Leslie was born on February 20, 1893 in Weybourne, Farnham, Surrey, England, the son of Henry Joseph Todman & Mary Townsend Clift.  The family is found on the 1901 census living at Rowhills Estate, Farnham, Surrey.
It is not known when Leslie emigrated to Canada, but he enlisted for service on October 26, 1914 in St. Thomas.  He was a farmer and was not married.  He names his next of kin as his father, Henry Todman, of Weybourne, Surrey, England.  He was a member of the 30th Battery, C.F.A., in Aylmer.
The St. Thomas Journal of July 15, 1916 reported that Pte. Leslie Norman Todman had been wounded.
No further information can be found.

Albert Victor Tomkinson

189170 / 123723
Albert Tomkinson’s name is found in an Roll of Honor of men who enlisted, printed in the East Elgin Tribune, March 2, 1916.  He is described as of “Aylmer”.
Albert was born on April 14, 1897 in Hellsway, London, England. He is found on the 1901 England census living at 109 Manor Road, East Ham, Essex.  His parents names are given as Frederick F. & Julia Tomkinson.
 He emigrated to Canada as a “home child”, leaving Liverpool on the ship Empress of Britain, and arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on April 7, 1911.  He was with a party from the Fagan Home.
 He was a farmer and not married when he enlisted for service on September 26, 1915 in St. Thomas.  The original service number (189170) was crossed out and replaced with 123723.  He names his next of kin as his father, Frank Tomkinson, of Ilford, Essex, England.  This was also crossed out and replaced with Miss A. Tomkinson of South Tottenham, London, England.
No further information is known.

Frederick Tomkinson

189344
Fred Tomkinson’s name is found in a list of recruits for the 91st Battalion, printed in the Aylmer Express, December 2, 1915.  He is described as a farmer, single, of Aylmer.
Fred was born on July 21, 1898 in Ilford, Essex, England.  He is found on the 1901 England census living at 109 Manor Road, East Ham, Essex.  His parents names are given as Frederick F. & Julia Tomkinson. He emigrated to Canada as a “home child”, leaving Liverpool on April 8, 1910 on the ship Empress of Ireland, and arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on April 15, 1910.  He was with a party from the Fagan Home. He is found on the 1911 census in Innisfil, Simcoe County, working as a domestic servant.
Fred was living near Aylmer when he enlisted for service there on November 13, 1915.  He gives his address as “care of W. B. Firby”. His next of kin is named as his father, Frank Tomkinson of Ilford, but that entry is crossed out and in its place is written Miss A. Tomkinson, Tottenham, London.   He was a farmer and was not married.
Fred was invalided back to Canada as the result of a gun shot wound to the neck, arriving in Halifax on July 8, 1918.  His residence is given as London, and states he has a sister as a dependent.  No further information can be found.

Fred Townsend

The name “Fred Townsend” is found in a list of men overseas who were sent a box of Christmas cheer by the Aylmer Women’s Institute, printed in the Aylmer Express, November 8, 1917.
Fred Townsend is found on the 1911 census in Malahide, a hired man living with Elizabeth Mitts, widow.  The census states he was born in England in May 1880, and emigrated to Canada in 1903.  Passenger lists show a Fred Townsend, age 18, a farmer from Middlesex, England, arriving in Montreal on July 11, 1903 aboard the ship Bavarian.
The closest attestation paper that can be found to match the above information is that of Frederick Stephen Townsend, #112143, who was born on May 11, 1882 in London, England. He was a painter and was not married. He had served 2 years and 8 months in the R.C.E.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mary E. Townsend of London, England.  He enlisted for service on April 24, 1915 in London.
The above Frederick was married in Toronto on January 27, 1923 to Ethel Cazally.  He was living at 301 Withrow Ave., Toronto and was a widower.
It cannot be positively determined if the above Frederick Stephen Townsend is the same man named in the Aylmer Express article.

Elgie Lyle Travis

675755
Elgie Travis was born on June 30, 1900 in Vienna, the son of William Arthur Travis (1864-1938) & Margaret Long (1858-1937).  William was born in Dereham township, the son of Robert W. & Anna Travis, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on June 27, 1887 in Springfield to Margaret Long, also of Bayham, the daughter of Peter & Jane Long.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Elgie was a labourer living in Vienna when he enlisted for service on March 11, 1916 in Tillsonburg.  He gives his date of birth as June 30, 1899 and names his father William, of Vienna, as his next of kin.
He died in 1966 and is buried in St. Luke’s cemetery with his wife Violet (1899-1986), and their son Larry Dale (1940-1960).

Frederick Hewiston (Hugeston) Travis

190028
Frederick Travis was born on December 26, 1887 in Vienna, the son of William Arthur Travis (1864-1938) & Margaret Long (1858-1937).  William was born in Dereham township, the son of Robert W. & Anna Travis, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on June 27, 1887 in Springfield to Margaret Long, also of Bayham, the daughter of Peter & Jane Long.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Frederick was living in New Hamburg when he was married on August 21, 1912 in Berlin (later Kitchener), to Marguerite Hewit, of Teeterville in Norfolk County, the daughter of James Hewitt & Mary Rohrer.
Frederick was living in Vienna, employed as a structure steel and iron worker when he enlisted for service on February 29, 1916 in Port Burwell.  He had served five years with the 39th Regiment.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Maggie, of Vienna, and states that he is single.  He joined the 91st Battalion.
Frederick is buried in his parents’ plot in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.  A footstone bearing only “Fred” marks his resting place.  No date of birth or death has been inscribed.

Morley Sandford Travis

190073
Morley Travis was born on January 24, 1897 in Vienna, the son of William Arthur Travis (1864-1938) & Margaret Long (1858-1937).  William was born in Dereham township, the son of Robert W. & Anna Travis, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on June 27, 1887 in Springfield to Margaret Long, also of Bayham, the daughter of Peter & Jane Long.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Morley was living in Vienna employed as a box maker when he enlisted for service on March 10, 1916 in St. Thomas. Following the war, he moved to Windsor where he was working as a mechanic when he was married on February 5, 1920 in Walkerville, Essex County to Harriet Tupper, of Windsor, the daughter of J. C. Tupper & Blanche Groves. Morley died in 1960 and is buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.  The inscription gives his date of birth as 1896.

Lyman Henry Tribe

257821  Lyman Tribe
Lyman Tribe was born on July 9, 1896 at Straffordville, the son of Reuben Henry Tribe (1845-1922) & Cora Elizabeth Williams (1870-1901).  Their marriage record cannot be found, but Reuben was the son of Thomas Tribe & Rachel Westover.  Cora was the daughter of John H. Williams & Lucy Jane Pressey. They are buried in Smuck cemetery.
Lyman moved to Bladsworth, Saskatchewan where he was a labourer when he enlisted for service on January 22, 1918 in Regina with the 1st Depot Battalion Saskatchewan Regiment.  He had previous military experience with the Volunteers Home Defense in Ontario.
Lyman arrived in England on April 3, 1918, and served with the 4th Battalion Canadian Machine Corps in France. He received a gunshot wound in the hip in August 1918 and was in hospital 1 ½ months.
Lyman returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on January 18, and was discharged on February 8, 1919 in London.   He was married to Murial Grace Schlievert (1908-1965), of Arnprior, Renfew County. They lived at Holland Landing, Ontario.  He died on June 8, 1962. They are buried in Albert Street Cemetery, Arnprior, McNab Township, Renfrew County.

Walter Balfour Tuck

3100
Walter Balfour Tuck was born on November 30, 1879 at Ipswich, Suffolk, England.  He emigrated to Canada in 1907, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Lake Champlain, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on February 27.  He was a clerk with the Christie Co. in Aylmer. By 1912 he was living in Battleford, Saskatchewan where he married Dora Ellen Russell of Bristol, England on May 27, 1912.
He enlisted for service at Battleford on December 21, 1914.  He had served one year with the South African Police in the 35th Regiment, and two years with the Norfolk Volunteer Artillery.
Mention of Walter was made in the Aylmer Express, November 30, 1916:
Sergeant Walter Tuck, formerly of the Christie Co., Aylmer, accompanied by Mrs. Tuck and little daughter, have been spending a few days with friends in Aylmer and vicinity. Walter has enlisted for overseas service and is attached to the Signalling division, with headquarters at Ottawa. His many friends were delighted to see him again. He expects to go overseas very shortly.
No further information is known.

John Alexander Tuff

3132966  John Alexander Tuff
John Tuff was born on September 9, 1898 in London, England, the son of John Henry Tuff (1871-1950) & Florence Emily Ellen (1875-1965).  John Henry Tuff was also a veteran of the Great War. The family emigrated to Canada in 1906, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Dominion, arriving in Quebec on April 30.
John was a farmer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 29, 1918 in London.
John was married to Mabel Rozell (1902-1984) and moved to Pontiac, Michigan where they lived for a few years in the 1920’s.  They had returned to Aylmer by 1929.
John died on May 18, 1981 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 20, 1981:
JOHN A. TUFF
John Tuff, 83, of St. Thomas, a retired Esso Service station owner and operator in Aylmer, died in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, Monday, May 18, 1981 after a lengthy illness.  Mr. Tuff operated the service station for a long period of time where Green’s Esso is situated. He retired from the business in 1966.
He was born in England and was a previous member of Trinity Anglican Church, Aylmer where he was a member of the church’s Men’s Club. While living in St. Thomas he was a member of St. John’s Anglican Church.
Mr. Tuff is survived by his wife, Mabel (Rozell) Tuff of St. Thomas, two daughters: Mrs. Donald (Doris) Bennett, St. Thomas; Mrs. Patricia (Pat) Cail, Windsor; sons: Donald and Kenneth Tuff, both of St. Thomas; Allan and David Tuff, both of Aylmer, and Dennis Tuff of St. Catharines; two sisters, Mrs. Lionel (Beatrice) Emberson, Guelph; Mrs. Joseph (Edna) Britschgi, London; two brothers, Harold Tuff, Port Burwell and George Tuff of London.
Mr. Tuff was predeceased by his parents John and Emily (Ellen) Tuff of Aylmer and two brothers Alfred and Cliff Tuff. A funeral service is arranged for Thursday, May 21 (tomorrow) at 1:30 p.m. in St. Thomas. Burial is in Aylmer Cemetery.

John Henry Tuff

190337  John Henry Tuff
John Henry Tuff was born on June 24, 1871 in Kertch, Russia, the son of Samuel Tuff (1846-1928) & Annie Kate Underwood.  Samuel was born in London, England, the son of John & Charlotte Tuff.  Samuel and his wife were living in Russia when their son John was born.  Samuel also emigrated to Canada and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.
John Tuff was married in London, England on October 31, 1896 to Florence Emily Ellen (1875-1965). The family emigrated to Canada in 1906, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Dominion, arriving in Quebec on April 30.
John was a farmer living at R.R. #4 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 3, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He had been a member of the 30th Battery C.F.A. for nine months.
A letter from John was published in the Aylmer Express, July 27, 1916:
91ST BATTALION HAD EXCELLENT TRIP
John Tuff, in Letter to His Wife, Says Food Was Excellent, and
Does Not Believe Stories Published About Poor Meals
Liverpool, July 5, 1916
My Dear Wife –
We embarked on Wednesday about 11:30 a.m., left on Thursday about 8:30 p.m.  We travelled on a splendid boat, which carried over 7,000 soldiers.  The trip was a splendid one – no rough seas all the way over.
We were supplied with plenty of good foot: For breakfast – coffee, meat, potatoes, oatmeal, bread and butter. For dinner – soup, meat, beans, peas, potatoes, pudding, or stewed fruit.  Supper – tea, meat, fish, jam, bread and butter. A change was made at every meal, so that we did not get the same kind of food twice the same day.  I did not hear any complaints made; there was no occasion for it, but you know there are always people who grumble at whatever they got.  I have read such letters in the Express.  I do not believe them, after the experience we had everywhere we have been.
Well, I must close for now, but will write soon again. With love to all, John Tuff
John returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on September 14.  He came back to Aylmer and lived at 296 John Street South.
John died on July 24, 1950 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, July 25, 1950:
VETERAN OF 91ST BA., JOHN H. TUFF DIES
Aylmer Citizen Many Years Was on Post Office Staff
Aylmer, July 25 – A prominent citizen of Aylmer, John H. Tuff, 79, died Monday in Westminster Hospital, London, Ont., after a year’s illness.  Mr. Tuff, who made his home at 296 John street south, was a son of the late Samuel Tuff and Annie Kate Underwood, both of whom came from England. He was born on June 24, 1871, while his parents were in Kerch, in southern Russia. Coming to Canada in 1906, Mr. Tuff lived at Springfield before coming to Aylmer. During World War 1, he served overseas with the 91st Battalion. For some 19 years Mr. Tuff served on the Aylmer Post Office staff.  A member of Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Mr. Tuff was a devout worker in its interests for many years.  He served as secretary of the congregation for some years and resigned that position only when ill health forced his retirement. He was a member of Branch 81 of the Canadian Legion, Aylmer. Surviving are his wife, the former Florence Emily Ellen; five sons, John A. Tuff, Aylmer; Alfred, of Lethbridge; Harold, Port Burwell; Clifford, St. Thomas; George, London, Ont.; two daughters, Mrs. Edna Staib, London, Ont; and Mrs. Beatrice Emberson, Guelph; two brothers, Sidney and William Tuff, in England; and a number of grandchildren.  At rest at the Hughson Funeral Home, the funeral to be held at Holy Trinity Anglican church on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Rev. F. C. McRitchie will officiate and interment will be made in Aylmer cemetery.

Firman Dudley TuffordFirman Tufford

Firman Tufford was born on March 28, 1899 in Malahide,  the son of Noble Freedom Tufford (1857-1941) & Lillis Pritchard (1865-1926).  Noble was the son of Rev. John Carpenter Tufford & Catharine Jane Yokum, and was living in Malahide when he was married on December 20, 1882 in Aylmer to Lillis Pritchard, a resident and native of Malahide, daughter of John Pritchard & Cynthia Burnham.  They farmed at lot 10, concession 3, and later lived at lot 11, concession 4, and lot 12, concession 7, before moving to Southwold Township prior to 1911.  Noble & Lillis are buried in Dunboyne cemetery.
Firman was a Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force. It is believed he enlisted with a British regiment during the First World War, since no attestation paper can be found for him in Canadian records.  After the war he became assistant vice president of Bell Telephone in Montreal.  He also served in World War 2.
Firman died on December 15, 1949 and is buried in Elmdale Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, December 15, 1949:
FIRMIN TUFFORD, OF PETERBOROUGH, DIES
Veteran of Two Wars Was Bell Telephone Manager
A former well-known resident of St. Thomas and a veteran of two world wars, Firmin Tufford, passed away on Thursday in Peterborough, after a long illness. Born in Dunboyne, a son of the late Noble and Lillis Tufford, the deceased was a member of a prominent and widely-known pioneer family of Elgin County.  He was district manager of the Bell Telephone Company in Peterborough where he had been since 1944, previously being located in Montreal.  A graduate of the University of Toronto, Mr. Tufford belonged to Delta Upslon Fraternity, Toronto Chapter. He served in the R.C.A.F. in World War 1 and in the Second World War held the rank of Flight Lieutenant. He was a member of the United Church and belonged to the Peterborough Rotary Club.  Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. James Davidson, Muirkirk; Miss Margaret Tufford, of Toronto; three brothers, Gordon and Ross Tufford, of Middlemarch; Frank Tufford, 10 Gladstone avenue, St. Thomas. A brother, Dr. Norman G. Tufford, predeceased him in Sweden in 1946.  The remains will arrive in St. Thomas on Friday at noon and will rest at the P. R. Williams and Son Funeral Home where service will be conducted on Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock, by Rev. E. W. Brearley of First United Church.

Norman Grant Tufford

190116
Norman Grant Tufford was born on September 23, 1896 in the Dunboyne area of Malahide, the son of Noble Freedom Tufford (1857-1941) & Lillis Pritchard (1865-1926).  Noble was the son of Rev. John Carpenter Tufford & Catharine Jane Yokum, and was living in Malahide when he was married on December 20, 1882 in Aylmer to Lillis Pritchard, a resident and native of Malahide, daughter of John Pritchard & Cynthia Burnham.  They farmed at lot 10, concession 3, and later lived at lot 11, concession 4, and lot 12, concession 7, before moving to Southwold Township prior to 1911.  Noble & Lillis are buried in Dunboyne cemetery.
Norman Grant Tufford enlisted with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas on March 22, 1916.  He was a student living at R. R. #1 St. Thomas with his parents.
Norman became a doctor and moved to Detroit about 1923.  He is found on the 1930 census in Detroit, with his wife Theodore T. Tufford, whom he married about 1927. They were traveling in Sweden when he died on August 10, 1946 at Eskiltuna.
Norman’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 15, 1946:
DISTRICT MAN DIES IN SWEDEN
Dr. N. G. Tufford in Europe for Visit
Word was received of the unexpected death in Sweden, of Dr. Norman Grant Tufford, a native of the Dunboyne district of Elgin and former well known resident in the Middlemarch district. Dr. Tufford was visiting Sweden with Mrs. Tufford and family.  His death occurred Saturday morning, August 10, in Eskilstuna, Sweden. Interment is being made in Eskilstuna.
Dr. Tufford was born in Dunboyne, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Noble F. Tufford.  He received his early education at Middlemarch and Fingal and was a graduate of the St. Thomas Collegiate Institute. He served overseas with the 91st Battalion during the First World War. Upon his return from overseas he entered the University of Toronto Medical School, graduating in medicine in 1923.  He interned in Harper and Ford Hospitals, Detroit. He did post-graduate work in London, England, returning to Detroit to practice.
Surviving are his wife; a son, Norman, and a daughter, Carolyn; also two sisters, Mrs. James Davidson, Muirkirk, Ont., and Miss Margaret Tufford, Toronto; and four brothers, Gordon and Ross of Middlemarch; Frank, 10 Gladstone Avenue, St. Thomas; and Firman Tufford of Peterborough, Ont.  Dr. and Mrs. Tufford and family sailed for Europe on July 1st.

Harold William Turnbull

334217
Harold Turnbull was born on April 17, 1898 in Usborne Township, Huron County near Kirkton, the son of Alexander Turnbull & Elizabeth Hackney.  He was a farmer living at RR 1 Kirkton when he enlisted for service with the 63rd Battery on March 9, 1917 in London.
Following the war, Harold and his wife Laura Mudge (1910-1984) farmed on the Jamestown Road in Malahide township for several years during the 1950s period.  He died on May 30, 1978 and is buried with his wife in Springford Cemetery, Oxford County.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 7, 1978:
HAROLD TURNBULL
Harold William Turnbull of 102 Grand Avenue, London, died Tuesday, May 30 at Westminster Hospital, London. He was 80 years old. The son of the late Alexander and Elizabeth (Hackey) Turnbull, he was born in Usborne Township, Middlesex County.  He was a World War I veteran.
Surviving are his wife, the former Laura Mudge; son Douglas of Mission Viego, California; brothers Wilfred of Toronto and Robert of Exeter; sister Mrs. David (Anne) Millar of Exeter. Also surviving are five grandchildren.
The funeral service was held Friday, June 2 from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home with Rev. William Maxwell of London officiating. Burial was in Springford cemetery. The pall bearers were members of the Corps of Commissionaires.

John Herbert Glen Turnbull

2043507
Glen Herbert Turnbull was born on May 23, 1894 in Aylmer, the son of David W. Turnbull & Jeanette (Nettie) E. Glen.  David was born in London, Ontario about 1860, the son of John & Jennie, and was an agent living in Aylmer when he was married on March 13, 1889 in Westminster Township to Nettie Glen, born about 1868 in Westminster, the daughter of James A. & Rose Glen.  David had a variety of occupations while living in Aylmer, including agent for sewing machines, insurance and a grocery store.  The family later moved to Winnipeg.
Glen Herbert was a salesman living with his parents at 502 Dominion Street, Winnipeg when he enlisted for service on December 22, 1916 in Winnipeg.  He was a Lieutenant in the 106th W.L.T. Qualified Infantry when he enlisted.
He returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Halifax on December 14.
Glenn was an agent living in Winnipeg when he was married on December 12, 1923 in Port Arthur, Ontario to Nora Kathleen Byrnes, of Port Arthur, the daughter of John Byrnes and Ester Robinson.
In 1939, Glen Turnbull was living in Hamilton, employed as the manager of National Paper Goods Company.
Glenn Turnbull died on March 9, 1975 and is buried in Hamilton cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Hamilton Spectator, March 11, 1975:
TURNBULL, H. Glenn – At the McMaster University Medical Centre on Sunday, March 9, 1975, H. Glenn Turnbull, beloved husband of Nora K. Byrnes in his 81st year. Dear father of Robert G. Turnbull and brother of Mrs. C. Brockie, Winnipeg. Also surviving are five grandchildren. Predeceased by a daughter, Mrs. Patricia Ann Elliott. Mr. Turnbull was the past president of National Paper Goods Ltd., and past president of the Hamilton Thistle Club. Resting at the Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, Main Street West at Bay Street, from Tuesday evening. Service in the Dodsworth Chapel on Thursday at 2 p.m. Interment Hamilton cemetery.

Alice Gertrude Turner

Nursing Sister
Alice Turner was born on August 21, 1891 in Aylmer, the daughter of James Turner (1842-1920) & Hester H. Hopkins (1847-1932).  James was born in Newcastle on Tyne, England, the son of John & Jane Turner and was living in Aylmer when he was married on November 27, 1866 in Aylmer to Hester H. Hopkins, also of Aylmer, a native of Almondsbury, England, daughter of Edwin & Harriet Hopkins. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Alice was a nurse living in Aylmer and enlisted for service on May 17, 1916 in London.  She was a lieutenant at the #10 Stationary Hospital, C.E.F.  She belonged to the C.A.M.C.
A letter from Alice to her parents was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, September 7, 1916:
No. 1 Canadian General Hospital, B.E.F.
Etaples, France
My Dear Mother and Father –
Well it is time for another note before going to bed, I shall scratch you a line. Well as I thought, I went on night duty. Have fifty patients and just one orderly and I to look after them all. But, oh, how I love it. Do not care how hard I have to work. I have very sick patients and it just makes my heart ache. Such young lads, about the age of Carl, and to hear them say “Thanks so much, sister”, just makes you feel you cannot do too much for them. I have never worked as hard, I do believe as now, but am standing it fine, feet feeling fine and I will stand it until the terrible war is over. Have been longing to get news from home, watch each mail, but in vain. Wish you would write to I should heard at least once a week. Send me a bundle of papers once in awhile. Should dearly love to know what goes on in the “homeland”.
We are having delightful weather, no rain scarcely, and as lovely for sleeping at night, but terribly warm in day time.
The No. 1 hospital has admitted between 25,000 and 30,000 patients since the beginning of the war and has the name of being the best hospital or of having best results of all hospitals.
Well, my dear, this is simply to say am well and happy. Trust you are feeling the same, and will be so until I shall return to my [main?] folk.  Yours with very much love and kisses,
Alice Gertrude
Alice returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on April 25.
Alice was married to Charles Jackson, and she died on October 8, 1971 in London. She is buried in Aylmer cemetery with her parents. Her obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, October 9, 1971:
MRS. ALICE JACKSON
LONDON, Ont. – Mrs. Alice (Allie) Jackson of 12 Adelaide Street South, London, Ontario, passed away at her home Friday, October 8. She was 80 years old. Born in Aylmer, she was a registered nurse. She had graduated from Victoria Hospital in 1919. She served in the First World War and had nursed at the Westminster Hospital in London, Ont., Christie Hospital in Toronto, and was a matron at Shaughnessy Hospital in Vancouver, B.C. Her husband Charles Jackson died in 1964.  She was the daughter of the late Mr and Mrs James Turner of Aylmer.
Surviving are one step-son, Charles Jackson of London, Ontario; one step-daughter, Mrs. George (Kathleen) Preston of Calgary, Alberta, and several step-grandchildren and great grandchildren.
Resting at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer, for service Monday 2 p.m. with Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church, Aylmer, officiating. Interment will be in Aylmer Cemetery.

Edwin Thomas Turner

189346  Edwin Thomas Turner
photo courtesy of Elgin County Archives
Edwin Turner’s name is found in a list of recruits for the 91st Battalion, printed in the Aylmer Express, December 2, 1915.  He is described as a horseman, single, of Aylmer.  He enlisted for service on November 6, 1915 in Aylmer.  His address is given as “care of Benson Summers, Aylmer”.  Edwin was born on July 31, 1880 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England, the son of Edwin & Sarah Turner. The family is found on the 1891 census living at 1 Willow Street, St. Margaret, Leicester.  Edwin names his next of kin as his sister, Mrs. Edith Moore, of 44 Laurel Road, Highfield, Leicester.  He had served one month in the Engineers.
No further information can be found.  The accompanying photo was found in the Scott collection at the Elgin County Archives, labeled only as “T. E. Turner”.  It is possible this is a photo of Edwin.

Mark Luther Turner

231298
Mark Turner was born on January 9, 1876 in Aylmer, the son of James Turner (1842-1920) & Hester H. Hopkins (1847-1932).  James was born in Newcastle on Tyne, England, the son of John & Jane Turner and was living in Aylmer when he was married on November 27, 1866 in Aylmer to Hester H. Hopkins, also of Aylmer, a native of Almondsbury, England, daughter of Edwin & Harriet Hopkins. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Mark was a clerk living in Aylmer when he was married on April 24, 1897 in Toronto to Christina Mathewson, of Toronto, the daughter of William & Phoebe Mathewson.
Mark moved to Edmonton where he was living at 9823 91st Ave., employed as a canner when he enlisted for service in the 202nd O.S. Battalion on April 1, 1916 in Edmonton.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on November 1.
Mark & Christina had  two children: Dr. William James Turner and Clarence Donald Turner.
Mark died on August 18, 1929 in Edmonton in his 59th year.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, August 20, 1929:
MARK TURNER FORMER AYLMER RESIDENT
Death Occurs Suddenly on Sunday at Home in Edmonton
Many Friends in District
Aylmer, Aug. 20 – People of Aylmer and vicinity were shocked to hear of the sudden passing of Mark Turner at his home in Edmonton on Sunday evening last.  Mr. Turner was an old Aylmer boy and was born here.  He was for some years connected with the Dominion Canners here, later moving in Edmonton. He was a man of high Christian character and highly esteemed by everybody.  No particulars are at present obtainable as to when the funeral will take place.  His wife was an Aylmer visitor last winter.  It is learned that Mr. Turner had not been in good health for some time but a cheery letter was received from him no later than August 10. Besides his widow, he is survived by two sons; his mother, Mrs. James Turner, of Aylmer; three sisters, Mrs. George Gilbert, of Adrian, Mich.; Mrs. Charles Phelps, of Malahide; and Miss Alice Turner, a nurse at Westminster Hospital, London; also three brothers, James, of Toronto; William of Whitby; and Edward, of Otterville.
An obituary with further detail was printed in the Aylmer Express, August 22, 1929:
MARK TURNER PASSES AT EDMONTON
Native of Aylmer and Former Canadian Canners Employee
Mrs. James Turner received word on Monday of the sudden death of her son, Mark, at his home in Edmonton, on Sunday last. Deceased was born here on Jan. 9th, 1870, and was consequently in his 59th year. He was the son of Mrs. Turner and the late James Turner, and spent the greater part of his life in Aylmer, where he attended school and later became a valued employee of the Canadian Canners.
Some years before the Great War he moved to Edmonton, and on the outbreak of hostilities he joined the 202nd Battalion in 1916, and went overseas, returning in 1919, the year after the cessation. His sudden death comes as a severe shock to his aged mother and his sister, Miss Alice Turner R.N., of London, as well as to his brothers and other sisters, and to his immediate family, all of whom have the sympathy of this whole community.
Besides his widow, who was Miss Christine Matheson, of Toronto, he leaves to mourn his loss, his aged mother, who resides here; two sons, Dr. Will Turner, of Edmonton; and Donald Turner, manager of the Royal Bank at Lethbridge; three sisters, Mrs. Geo. G. Gilbert, of Adrian, Mich.; Mrs. Charles Phelps, of Malahide; and Miss Alice, R.N., of London; three brothers, James, of Toronto; Edward of Otterville, and William of Whitby.

Vernon Leverne Turrill

Vernon Turrill was born on July 14, 1881 in Aylmer, the son of Mahlon Franklin Turrill & Amelia Ann Backus (Backhouse).  Mahlon was born in Yarmouth, the son of Joseph & Hannah Turrill and was a farmer living in Malahide when he was married on July 7, 1880 in St. Thomas to Amelia Backus, of Malahide, the daughter of John Rolph Backhouse & Margaret Taylor. Mahlon & Amelia and their family are found on the 1901 census in Aylmer.
Vernon was a medical doctor.  He was married on April 17, 1911 to Dorothy E. Grant.  He moved to Saskatchewan and was living at DeLisle, Saskatchewan when he enlisted for service on October 30, 1916 in Winnipeg.  He was a captain in Unit 10 of the A.M.C.T.D.
Dr. Turrill returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in Halifax on November 14.
No further information can be found.

Harry Tyler

The name Harry Tyler appears on a Springfield Roll of Honor.  On the 1911 census for Springfield, there is a Harry George Tyler, born December 1889, a lodger with James Henry & Rosey Mannell. He was born in England and according to the census emigrated in 1906.
There is a Henry Tyler in the “Home Children” emigration database at the National Archives of Canada.  Henry was 15 (born 1889) when he emigrated to Canada from Liverpool on March 17, 1904 aboard the ship Ionian, landing in Halifax on March 27, 1904.
An attestation paper was found for a Henry Tyler #22098.  His address was not given, and his date of birth simply as “December 19″ [no year].  He was born at Leicester, Leicestershire, England.  He names no next of kin.  He was a skilled labourer and was not married.  He had served 12 years in the Royal Garrison Artillery. He enlisted for service on September 26, 1914 in Valcartier.
Passenger lists show a Harry George Tyler returning to Canada from England in 1919, arriving in Halifax on May 25.  There is no indication he was a returning soldier.  The record states that he first came to Canada in 1949 and had been in Toronto for nine years.
A marriage record was found for a Harry George Tyler, age 28, of Toronto. He was a native of England, the son of Richard Cartwright Tyler & Sarah Ann Suckling.  He was married at Mt. Dennis in York County on May 24, 1920 to Edith Annie Miller, of York Township.
It cannot be determined if the above Henry or Harry George Tyler is the same Harry Tyler on the 1911 Springfield census.

James Tyrrell

126027
James Tyrrell was born on January 28, 1897 at Corinth, the son of James Albert Tyrrell (1871-1916) & Elizabeth Harriet Cole (1875-1928).  James was the son of Ambrose Tyrrell & Mary Silverthorn and was a widower living in Bayham when he was married on November 16, 1895 at Eastwood in Oxford County to Elizabeth Cole, of Eastwood, daughter of George Cole & Martha Sibley.  They moved to Woodstock where they are found on the 1911 census.  They are buried in Woodstock.
James was a labourer living with his mother at 81 Chapel Street, Woodstock when he enlisted for service there on August 19, 1915. He joined the 71st Battalion on September 1, 1915.
Following the war, James moved to Detroit where he was living at 3900 15th Street in 1928 when his mother died.  He is found on the 1930 census in Detroit, employed by a cab company as a chauffeur.  The census states he emigrated to the US in 1919.  His wife’s name was Harriet, a native of England, whom he married about 1918, and their children were: Marjorie (born ca 1920 Canada); William (1921) and Dorothy (1924).
It is possible that James & Harriet were married in England before he returned home.  A marriage record was found for a James Tyrrell & Harriet Peacock in West Derby, Lancashire in 1918.
No further information is known.

John Wesley Tyrrell

270483
John Tyrrell was born on April 21, 1862 in Corinth, the son of Ambrose Tyrrell(1828-1883) & Mary Silverthorn (1828-1904). They are buried in Best Cemetery, Corinth.
John was a farmer living in Middleton Township, Norfolk County when he was married on December 14, 1889 in Tillsonburg to Margaret Ann Scanlan, of Bayham, the daughter of John & Sarah Scanlan.
John & Margaret moved to Brantford, where they are found on the 1911 census living at 7 Edgerton Street.  Their children were: George A. (1890); Roy W. (1894) & Philip R. (1903).  There were two other sons, Owen and Franklin.
John was a teamster living at 102 Queen Street, Brantford when he enlisted for service on June 19, 1916 in Brantford. He had served nine years in the 39th Regiment, and nine years in the 38th Regiment, and belonged to the 38th Dufferin Rifles. He incorrectly gave his date of birth on his attestation paper as April 21, 1872. He joined the 215th Battalion.
John died on June 21, 1917 at 55 Victoria Street, Brantford, at the age of 55, from cancer of the stomach. He is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Brantford.
His obituary appeared in the Brantford Expositor, June 22, 1917:
JOHN W. TYRRELL
The death took place on Thursday of John Tyrrell at his home, 55 Victoria street. He had been a corporal in the Dufferin Rifles, and had trained at Niagara Camp for overseas service, but had been rejected before his battalion left for overseas, as not fit to stand the heavy strain.  He had not been well since his return from the camp. His widow and five children survive, two of these, Geo. A., of the Strathcona Horse, France; and Roy Wesley, now in the Canadian Hospital at Orpington, Kent, England, being of the Canadian overseas forces, while Philip R., Owen and Franklin are at home. The deceased was a member of the Loyal Orange Lodge and the Canadian Order of Oddfellows.

Glenn Wilfred Mowat Udell

3130576  Glenn Udell
Glenn Udell was born on November 7, 1893 in Springfield, the son of Almen Udell (1859-1917) & Mary Elizabeth Dean (1861-1911).  Almen was born in South Dorchester, the son of George & Catherine Udell, and was farming there when he was married on October 26, 1881 in Aylmer to Mary Dean, also of South Dorchester, the daughter of Hiram Dean & Elizabeth Jones.  They are buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue.
Glenn was living at 47 Barnes Street, St. Thomas, employed as a railway brakeman when he enlisted for service on January 21, 1918 in London.
He was married on June 18, 1918 in London to Lula Beatrice Roy (1899-1980), a native of St. Thomas living in London, the daughter of William Roy & Lottie Guyett.
Glenn died in 1967 and is buried in Queen of Peace cemetery, Aylmer.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 5, 1967:
RETIRED CONDUCTOR DIES
Glen Udell, 34 Rutherford Ave., died Wednesday afternoon in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital at the age of 76.  He was a retired New York Central Railroad conductor and had been in hospital since Sunday. He lived most of his life in St. Thomas and for the past ten years in Aylmer. He was a member of Our Lady of Sorrows Church. He is survived by his wife, Lulu; three sons, Lloyd of Montreal; John and Robert of St. Thomas; two daughters Mrs. Charles (Betty) McAuliffe and Mrs. Charles (Carol) Duncan, both of London. The funeral will be held from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home.

George Milton Vanpatter  George VanPatter

George Vanpatter was born on April 26, 1891 at Luton, in Malahide, the son of John Milton Vanpatter (1855-1924) & Lizzie Halls (1863-1928).  Milton Vanpatter was born in Malahide, the son of John & Esther Vanpatter, and was living in Malahide when he was married on October 13, 1886 in Aylmer to Lizzie Halls, of Aylmer, the daughter of George & Catherine Halls. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
No attestation paper can be found for George, but he is pictured in uniform with his four brothers.
George was a farmer living in Aylmer when he was married on October 18, 1916 in Aldborough Township to Isabel McMillan (1889-1944), a native and resident of Rodney, and daughter of Duncan McMillan & Flora Graham. Isabel was a school teacher when she was married.
George & Isabel had a son George D. Vanpatter (1921-1944) who died on active service in India.
George died on October 21, 1969 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 22, 1969:
GEORGE VANPATTER
Widely known in dairy cattle circles, George VanPatter, 78, of New Sarum, died this (Wednesday) morning in St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. He had been ill for two months.  Mr. VanPatter was born on the VanPatter homestead on the 5th concession of Malahide Township on April 26, 1891. His parents were the late John VanPatter and Elizabeth Halls.
A dairy farmer for many years, Mr. VanPatter operated the Woodland Dairy and sold his products in Aylmer until 1945 when he came to Aylmer and became associated with the Holstein Friesian Association of Canada. He had bred a number of outstanding animals and his Holstein herd was rated one of the best in Canada. He was the recipient of the Master Breeder Award in 1942 and also the Veteran Breeder’s Award.
He served as a director of the Holstein Friesian Association of Canada for some time, and had been an official classifier for the association and had served on the advisory committee on Type Classification.
Mr. VanPatter attended the Aylmer Baptist Church. He was on the directorate of the Aylmer and East Elgin Agricultural Society for years and was a founder and a director of Pleasant Valley Golf & Country Club Ltd., at New Sarum. He was a member of the Aylmer Curling Club.
Twice married, Mr. VanPatter’s first wife was the former Isabelle McMillan who died in 1944. He is survived by his widow, the former Jean Ruckle; one son, Gerald of RR 6 Aylmer; two daughters, Mrs. Donald (Marion) Johnston and Mrs. Frances Hindmarsh, both of Aylmer; one stepdaughter, Mrs. Edward (Marilyn) Allen of Fort Lauderdale, Florida; one brother, John VanPatter, St. Thomas; one sister, Mrs. Morris (May) Wood of Kingston; 13 grandchildren and six great grandchildren also survive. Two sons predeceased, Donald in 1953 and George in 1944.
The Rev. Gordon Woodcock of the Aylmer Baptist Church will conduct the service Friday at 2:30 p.m. at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer. Burial in Aylmer Cemetery.

Harold Weaver Vanpatter

Harold Vanpatter was born on September 14, 1895 in Malahide, the son of Leonard K. Vanpatter (1852-1929) & Anna G. Weaver (1859-1946).  Leonard was a native of Malahide, the son of Abram & Mary Vanpatter, and was farming there when he was married on June 13, 1878 in Port Bruce to Anna Weaver, a native and resident of Bayham, daughter of Allen & Lucine Weaver.  Leonard & Anna are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Harold moved to the United States about 1912, settling in Detroit.  He was living at 563 Concord Street, Detroit, employed as a clerk with the Michigan Central Railroad when he enlisted for service with the United States forces.
A letter from Harold was published in the Aylmer Express, January 30, 1919:
“SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE” IS HISTORY NOW
Harold VanPatter Writes of His Experience Overseas With Uncle Sam’s Forces
Mrs. L. K. VanPatter has Received the Following Descriptive Letter From Her Son:
Brest, France, November 27, 1918
Dear Mother:
Your most welcome letter written November 3rd, reached me safely on November 24th, being just three weeks coming over. You must have had a hospital for awhile, didn’t you? Am glad to know that both Jesse and father are getting along O.K., and by the time this letter reaches you, I suppose they will be completely well again. Our organization left the States just in time to miss the epidemic, and I know nothing of it, other than what I have heard or read.
The “Stars and Stripes”, the official A.E.F. newspaper, published an item the other day, saying we could freely discuss in our letters, all past and present operations, and tell where we were and where we had been. That means that the phrase “Somewhere in France” is a matter of history now – you will see I started this letter by writing the name of the city where we are located. If you will take your map of France , you will find Brest situated on the west coast, and just as close to America as it possibly can be without getting into the ocean. That is about as close to the firing line as this regiment has ever been, or ever will be now, so you see I was not in the least danger from even a long distance gun.
Since arriving here on October 6th, the regiment has been engaged in constructing an enormous camp and when completed, will hold one hundred thousand troops. We have made remarkable progress and have made a great reputation for ourselves exceeding all bounds set for us by the Chief Engineer A.E.F. . It is said that nearly ninety per cent of the two million men now in France will embark at this point, so you see our work has been a very necessary part in the big campaign.
You wanted to know where I slept, what I ate, etc. Well, we are quartered in some of the barracks built by the regiment. They are of sheet iron and will house about 150 men each. We have cots or bunks to sleep on, they being two deep – I have a bottom one, and it is very comfortable. The weather is by no means severe, and we have stoves to heat our quarters. As for eats – we are not neglected at all. For instance, this morning we had griddle cakes or flapjacks and syrup, bacon bread and coffee. I ate four slices of bacon and five large cakes, so think I will last until dinner time. Of course some of the boys would kick, no matter what we had to eat.
I suppose you will want to know as much as I can tell you, so I will make a start, although the censor may decide to scratch some of it out. We left Camp Wheeler on Saturday, Sept. 6th, with orders to proceed to Camp Mills, N.Y. (on Long Island), and arrived there on the following Tuesday – no, late Monday night, where we stayed for one week, during which time we were fitted out with our overseas uniforms and other equipment, and examined every day for physical fitness. We boarded a British Royal Mail steamer of considerable size, at Hoboken, N.J., about an hours’ ride by rail and boat from Camp Mills, at 11 a.m., September 16th and that afternoon at 5:00 o’clock we said goodbye to New York city and the Statue of Liberty, and steamed out into the harbor, where we dropped anchor near a number of other transports that were going to sail with us. The next morning about 11:30 I believe, we set out to sea, being one of fifteen ships, and with hydroplanes and balloons above and battle ships and destroyers all around us. You will possibly recall that only a day or two prior to our sailing, an American transport was engaged by a German sub not far out of New York harbor, so every precaution was taken to avoid a repetition.
Gradually our convoy left us, until but one battle ship and one destroyer remained. When we woke on the morning of the 13th day at sea, a rugged, barren coast was visible far to the starboard side of the ship, and it surely did look good to me. This we were informed was the north coast of the Emerald Isle. Before night, land also appeared on the port side of the ship, this being the west coast of Scotland, and soon we were met by numerous destroyers, presumably British, who vouched for our safety until we landed, as that part of the coast was considered very dangerous. Of course we wore life preservers continually, but that last night out, there were a good many that slept but little.
I spent a very busy two weeks on the way over, making up numerous lists that had to be ready by the time we landed, but was not so busy that I did not see all the ocean that I care to see for awhile, unless it is to see it when I come back home again. The mornings were taken up with physical exercises and boat drills and in the afternoons the boys had sports – boxing, swatting the Kaiser, etc. Our ship carried a number of Red Cross Nurses and a lot of the time was spent in singing.
On the night of September 28th, we passed safely through the danger zone, and steamed into the Firth of Clyde on the west coast of Scotland, and when we awoke next morning, we were about to dock at Glasgow, where our ship eventually docked at 9:00 a.m. I think I attempted to describe the beautiful scene that stretched itself before us that early morning on the Clyde, but words are not strong enough to paint a picture of it. How I wish you could all have been there to enjoy it with me.
At 1:15 that afternoon, Headquarters Company walked down the gang plank and boarded the funniest looking little railway coaches I ever saw, drawn by an engine that would make a good brother to a peanut roaster, and before starting out we were serenaded by those popular Scottish noise making devices, the bagpipes. These little cars and dinky engines surely gave us a surprise though. They have excellent railroad and tracks in Scotland and England and we lost no time on the way. One would almost believe he was on the 20th Century Limited, bound for New York City. We rode all that day, Sept. 30th, stopping at occasional stations, where the Red Cross ladies – I guess that is what they were – gave us hot coffee. I won’t take time to tell you all the names of the big cities through which we passed, but we passed through a big part of Scotland and crossed England from north to south, arriving at Winchester, England, the next morning about 5:30 where we unloaded ourselves and marched out through the city to an American Rest Camp some two miles away from the station. We stayed here that day and on the following one. The next day found us aboard another dinky train and headed for Southampton, England, where we again boarded ship and donned life preservers, preparatory to making the perilous voyage across the English channel. We headed out at 6:00 o’clock that night, and had an uneventful trip across, except for the rough sea, landing at Le Havre, France, during the early morning of October 3rd. At 7:00 that morning we left the ship and marched about six miles out through the city to another rest camp. Stayed here that day until 1:15 p.m. the next, when we marched back tot he city and boarded our “French Pullman’s”, marked “Homes – 40 Cheveaux 8″ for our memorable trip through France – the only one I have been privileged to take here, so far. We travelled a very circuitous route, passing through Rouen, Versailles, LeMans, Rennes, Morlaix – at one time being within 40 miles of Paris, and finally landing at Brest on the morning of October 6th. We marched through Brest and out two miles, to Camp Pontanezan, where we have been since that time.
Brest is a very historic old city and was an important and naval station in the time of Napoleon. It is built right out to the water’s edge and is well fortified with huge walls of masonry and occasional old-fashioned drawbridges. One interesting feature of the city is a large – well I guess you would call it a castle. The castle, or Chateaux, as they call it, it is built out on the rocks near the ocean. I just forget how old it is, but it was built centuries ago, the work having been commenced sometime B.C. I had an opportunity to visit certain unrestricted parts of it the other Sunday, and the guide told all sorts of weird tales about the place, how they tortured people there, etc. He showed us a well in the inner court yard that was about 80 feet deep and drilled through the rock to the sea level. At the bottom of this well, once on a time, there were numerous knives projecting upwards. The prisoner would be taken to the well and dropped down on the knives, then the water from the bay would be turned in, and the body would be washed out. We were taken through all kinds of underground passages, some of them being so small that we were obliged to almost crawl, and at the end of one of these passages we crawled through a small hole but through the rock in the floor of the passage, and descended a ladder to find ourselves in a blind vault some twenty feet deep, cut from solid rock, it was enough to make one shudder; I surely would not like to be detained there for any length of time. Of course all these passageways and vaults were in total darkness, our guide carrying alight to show us the way. There are many incidents in the history of Brest connected with this Chateau, but time nor space will permit of their being told here.
Camp Potanezen is very old also, having been constructed in the time of Napoleon. Surrounding the camp is a 20 foot stone wall and inside is a small drill ground skirted by ancient stone barracks. It is said that this place is connected with the Chateau down town by an underground passageway. Just like what we read about in story books, isn’t it. We are not in Camp Pontanezen proper, but are just across the road, it all being designated by the same name however.
I think the above is a very complete description of my travels in Europe. What I have omitted here, I will tell you when Uncle Sammy is through with me.
You wanted to know just what I was doing. I am in the office (Regimental Headquarters), and am kept quite busy. For the past few days the office force has been busy getting ready the payrolls for the regiment. We signed the payroll yesterday, it going to the Quartermaster on December 1st, and the money being ready for us about the 15th of the month.
I have been kept rather busy for the last few evenings. Went to town Sunday afternoon and when I returned found a stack of letters waiting for me, fourteen in number, and have been doing my best to answer them in the meantime. Will surely have to cut down on the length of them though, or I will never get them answered. It wouldn’t do to make each one as long as this one. No doubt the censor has vowed to get even with me too, sometime, for causing him so much trouble.
Must close now. This letter leaves me in the very best of health and with everything just fine, so don’t worry at all, because I think I can stand as much as the next one, God willing.
With love, Harold
Following the war, Harold returned to Detroit where he resumed his employment with the railroad as a claim agent.  He was married on May 8, 1920 to Mildred C. Scott in Detroit, and by 1930 they had moved to Cleveland where they are found on the census. Harold was employed as an adjustor. Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, May 13, 1920:
Mr and Mrs Leonard K. VanPatter have returned home after spending the weekend in Detroit, where they attended the marriage of their son, Harold W., to Mildred C. Scott, of that city, on Saturday, May 8th, 1920. After an extended trip, consisting of a few days spent in New York and Washington, and a tour of the New England States, visiting Boston and Atlantic City, the young couple will return to Detroit, where Mr. VanPatter is employed as a travelling claim adjuster by the Michigan Central Railroad Company.
Harold died in Cleveland on February 23, 1978.

Homer Edgar Vanpatter  Homer VanPatter

Homer Vanpatter was born on May 29, 1898 at Luton, in Malahide, the son of John Milton Vanpatter (1855-1924) & Lizzie Halls (1863-1928). Milton Vanpatter was born in Malahide, the son of John & Esther Vanpatter, and was living in Malahide when he was married on October 13, 1886 in Aylmer to Lizzie Halls, of Aylmer, the daughter of George & Catherine Halls. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
No attestation paper can be found for Homer, but he is pictured in uniform with his four brothers.
Homer was a clerk living in Malahide when he was married on September 4, 1922 in Aylmer to Viola E. Herbert, a native of Courtland living in Aylmer, the daughter of Ralph Herbert & Emma J. Marsland.
Homer & Viola moved to Detroit, where a daughter was born in 1923.  He died in 1959 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his second wife Celia Champagne (1913-1994).

Hugh Stanley Vanpatter

304557  Hugh VanPatter
Hugh Vanpatter was born on November 26, 1892 at Luton, in Malahide, the son of John Milton Vanpatter (1855-1924) & Lizzie Halls (1863-1928).  His birth registration gives his middle name as Milton, but both his attestation paper and marriage record says Stanley.  Milton Vanpatter was born in Malahide, the son of John & Esther Vanpatter, and was living in Malahide when he was married on October 13, 1886 in Aylmer to Lizzie Halls, of Aylmer, the daughter of George & Catherine Halls. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Hugh was a civil engineer living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 10, 1915 in Kingston.  He had served in the 5th Es. Can. Engineers from 1913 to 1914.
A letter from Hugh was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 23, 1916:
SHELL HOLES THIRTY FEET DEEP IN FRANCE
Gunner Hugh VanPatter Writes of Some of His Experiences
Mrs. J. M. VanPatter has received the following letter from her son, Hugh.
Somewhere in France, Sept. 21, 1916
Dear Mother –
Hope you have not been worrying too much over my long silence.  I’m quite all right and getting along famously.  I am at present sitting in a nice little dugout with plenty of stout steel rails overhead and lots of sandbags all around. Have been awfully busy since last writing. I really could not seem to find time to write a letter. This issue of writing paper just came tonight, so I’ve made up my mind to write you a good long one, if I possibly can.
We just had things fixed up fine at our last position, with improved fireplaces, draining systems, fine new horse barns built, etc, when the powers that be decided to move us. We had a nice long move this time, taking up the better part of a week. Conditions were not of the best as it rained a good share of the time and our billets were not always of very high-class order. However, I was pretty lucky myself.  I slept out under the stars two nights and it didn’t rain at all. All the other nights it rained, but I was fortunately under good cover. Not all were so fortunate.
We passed along quite a piece back from the firing line and had a chance to get an idea of what France is really like where it has not been blown to pieces by the war. We saw some wonderfully fine country, much opener and more gently rolling than most of the country I have seen over here.  It is a great deal like much of the prairie, with a few more trees.
We spent a day or so in camp at the end of our journey, making ready for action again We pulled into position after dark and first impressions were decidedly unfavorable. Fro about the last three miles the country was nothing but a mess of shell holes of all sizes, up to thirty feet deep, absolutely no signs of grass, trees, houses or anything else. For most of the way the road was good but for the last mile or so it was awful. With six teams on the gun they had their work cut out.  It certainly wasn’t a very bright prospect at first, but now that the novelty of the surroundings has worn off it isn’t bad agt all. We are not shelled very much. Evidently the Hun has not much ammunition to spend on the artillery. We are behind a well defined ridge and as long as we have the mastery of the air, it is practically impossible for the enemy to observe our positions.  We have been here some ten days and have had no casualties.
Have been doing quite a lot of firing lately, so much that quite a few of the boys are quite deaf. Pete Prowse is feeling fine. My right hand man, Ed. Thomson is afflicted. It does not bother me at all so far. I keep wadding in my ears all the time so as to be always prepared.
Received the sweater coat, socks, etc. a couple of days ago. They certainly were welcome. It is getting to be quite cool at times. Quite a frost this morning. However, we have enough work to do to keep us warm most of the time. Please send me a nice big fruit cake for Christmas, with a few extras, such as nuts, chocolates and cigarettes on the side. Extras are pretty scarce over here.Love to all, Hugh.
Hugh returned from overseas on July 24, 1919, arriving at Halifax. Following the war, Hugh moved to Quebec where he worked as an engineer.  He was living at 625 Notre Dame Street, Lachine, Quebec when he was married on September 2, 1922 in Prescott, Ontario to Jean McDowell MacPherson, of Prescott, the daughter of Wilmot Ferdinand MacPherson & Jennie A. Plumb. Following their marriage, Hugh & Jean lived in Montreal.
Hugh died on November 8, 1967 in his 75th year. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, November 8, 1967:
HUGH VAN PATTER
A native of Malahide Township, Hugh Van Patter of 612 Belmont Ave., Westmount, Montreal, died Wednesday morning in Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal.  He suffered a stroke last Sunday.  Mr. Van Patter was in his 75th year.  He was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Milton Van Patter and was a graduate of the old Aylmer High School and Queen’s University, Kingston.  He retired some years ago as an engineer with the Dominion Engineering Corp., Montreal.  He was a member of the United Church.
Surviving are his wife, Jean; two sons, Dr. Terry Van Patter in Toronto, and Dr. Douglas Van Patter in Boston, Mass.; one daughter, Mrs. William (Jean) Slaght in Calgary, Alta.; and ten grandchildren; two brothers, George of R.R. 3, St. Thomas; John of R.R. 8, St. Thomas, and a sister, Mrs. Morris (Mae) Wood of Kingston.
Funeral arrangements were incomplete this morning.

Jesse VanPatter

3138532
Jesse Abraham Lewis VanPatter was born on September 27, 1896 in Malahide, the son of Leonard Kinsey VanPatter (1852-1929) & Anna Gertrude Weaver (1859-1946).  Leonard was born in Malahide, the son of Abram & Mary VanPatter, and was married in Port Bruce on June 13, 1878 to Anna Weaver, born in Bayham, the daughter of Allen & Lucinda Weaver.
Leonard & Anna were living in Michigan about 1881 when a son was born, but returned to Malahide about 1888, where they lived on the 5th concession in the Summers Corners area. They are buried in Luton cemetery.
Jesse was living at R.R. #1 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 13, 1918.  He was a farmer and was not married.
Jesse died on December 20, 1979 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with his wife Gladys Mae Sturgis (1898-1981).  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 26, 1979:
JESSE A. L. VanPATTER
Jesse A. L. VanPatter, 83, of 52 Treelawn Ave., Aylmer, died Thursday, Dec. 20 at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. Mr. VanPatter was born in Malahide Township on Sept. 27, 1896. He was the son of the late Leonard and Annie (Weaver) VanPatter. He was retired from general farming and lived most of his life in Malahide Township before moving to Aylmer 14 years ago.
He was a member of St. Paul’s United Church and a former member of the Optimist Club of Aylmer. He was predeceased by brothers Harry and Harold.  Surviving is his wife, the former Mae Sturgis.
The funeral was held Saturday Dec. 22 from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home. Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church officiated. Burial was made in Aylmer Cemetery.
Pallbearers were Allan Cross, Murray Laidlaw, John Sweet, Sloan McConnell, Clinton Kipp and Grant Johnston. Flowers were carried by Jim Kenney, Stan Bowen, Don Rawlins and Brian Cross.

John Allan Vanpatter  John VanPatter

John Allan Vanpatter was born on July 23, 1889 at Luton, in Malahide, the son of John Milton Vanpatter (1855-1924) & Lizzie Halls (1863-1928). Milton Vanpatter was born in Malahide, the son of John & Esther Vanpatter, and was living in Malahide when he was married on October 13, 1886 in Aylmer to Lizzie Halls, of Aylmer, the daughter of George & Catherine Halls. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
No attestation paper can be found for John, but he is pictured in uniform with his four brothers.
John was a farmer living in Malahide when he was married on October 20, 1915 at Luton to Lulu Gracey Matthews (1889-1957), also of Malahide, the widow of Murray Norman Matthews, and daughter of Daniel Gracey & Mary Burge.
John died on July 8, 1980 at the age of 91, and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 16, 1980:
JOHN A. VANPATTER
Ninety-one year old John A. VanPatter was found dead in a barn at his residence, RR 8 St. Thomas, Tuesday, July 8.  It was presumed he had fallen from a stepladder on which he had been standing while working with a crowbar and hammer. These tools were found beside him on the floor and it was thought he died either from hitting his head in the fall or from a heart seizure.
Mr. VanPatter was an uncle of Jack VanPatter, RR 5 Aylmer, retired owner of the VanPatter Appliance and Furniture store in Aylmer.
The late Mr. VanPatter was born July 23, 1889 in Aylmer, the son of the late John M.  and Lizzie (Halls) VanPatter. He was a retired farmer who lived in the Aylmer district since 1929. He was a member of the Yarmouth Centre United Church.
Mr. VanPatter was predeceased by his wife, Lulu (Gracey) VanPatter in 1957. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. John (Alma) Penhale of 29 Rosebery Place, St. Thomas and one sister, Mrs. Morris (May) Wood of Kingston. Five brothers, Charles, George, Hugh, Bruce and Homer predeceased him. Five grandchildren, seven great grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews also survive.
The funeral was held Friday morning from the Williams Funeral Home, St. Thomas, with burial in Aylmer cemetery.  The service was conducted by the Rev. E. Lindenburger of St. Mark’s United Church. Miss Doris Evans played the organ. The pallbearers were Kenneth Hiepleh, Julien Martin, George Elms, Kenneth Goodhue, Richard Joiner and Gary Gonyou.

Robert Bruce VanPatter

213155  Robert Bruce VanPatter
Robert Bruce VanPatter was born on May 24, 1896 in Malahide, the son of John Milton VanPatter (1855-1924) & Lizzie Hall(s) (1863-1928).  Milton, the son of John & Esther, was married to Lizzie in Aylmer on October 13, 1886.  She was the daughter of George & Catherine Hall(s).  Milton & Lizzie are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Bruce was living in Amherstburg, Ontario when he enlisted for service on December 7, 1915.  He enlisted at Amherstburg with the 99th Battalion in Essex Co. He gave his occupation as druggist.
A letter from Bruce was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 16, 1916:
HUNS DON’T LIKE THE CANADIANS
Mother Earth Best Friend in the Trenches
Mr. John VanPatter, Luton, has received the following interesting letter from his brother, Pte. Bruce VanPatter, son of Mr and Mrs J. M. VanPatter, of Aylmer.  Pte. VanPatter also has a brother, Gunner Hugh VanPatter, overseas.
Dear John –
Received your most welcome letter yesterday and see no reason why you should apologize for not writing much of a letter. What about me, when I have several to write, and no news at all. I have been up the line now about two weeks and have been in the trenches and out again for a week, then back to them again next week. Experience is the best teacher to show one how to take care of himself up here. Believe me, I don’t intend to take any unnecessary chances in this game.  There are enough close ones without looking for them, wherever you are in the line. The Hun’s artillery is wicked all right, and is used with remarkable accuracy for the chance they have to direct it.  Our airmen have the whole thing though, and hardly allow Fritz to put up an observation balloon. I was under several minor bombardments and it is not exactly pleasant and when you consider the number of our shells that go over, and accurately too, you can understand that it must be proper hell in the German trenches.  Most of their shells are comparatively light, while ours are heavy and lots of them. His artillery is all that is keeping him going, I really believe. When our battalion went over, my company was in reserve and we could see them go until they got nearly to our barrage and on the other side of the barrage we could see the Huns running like the deuce towards Berlin I guess, if nobody stopped them. They don’t like the Canadians a little bit, as they say we use the bayonet too much and won’t take prisoners.  They will fight if their numbers are superior and they have quite an advantage, but at anywhere near even money they say “Merci, Komerad”, and are willing to give any darned thing they own to you, to spare them. You mention our equipment. We have all sorts of it, more than is pleasant to carry. We all have the Enfield rifle now, but for all they run down the Ross rifle, it is a good one, but the Enfield is lighter and better for trench fighting. For shooting woodchucks I’d sooner have the Ross, but I haven’t seen any of them yet. I tell you in the trenches mother earth is just about our best friend. You hear a shell coming and it is time to dig for your funk-hole to see what happens. You can tell by the sound of them which side they are going and generally what kind of a shell.  The big ones make a noise like a railroad engine, but the little ones just come whizz-bang.  Just a whistle and they are onto you. They call them “whizzbangs” on this account.  One of them took the top off my funk-hole or little dugout the second day I was in, but it didn’t do anything but cover me up with dirt. I seem to be lucky so far, but one cannot tell what is coming one minute ahead. The main thing, though, is being cool and careful and using common sense.  It beats the dickens what a fellow can go through and then come out alive.
Well this is the last of my paper so I’ll try to fill this page and finish.  I hear tonight that we are going to move to another part of the line and we won’t be going back in here where we were before. Where we are going is quieter than here, they say. Well, I won’t kick, of course, if it is quiet.  I believe Hugh’s Battery is somewhere around here, now, but it is not likely I will see him as there are so many we see every day.  I told you, I guess, that he is putting through my transfer, so I should soon be with him.  Was near Alfred Benson’s Battery, too. I found out by inquiry but did not get a chance to hunt him up. You can’t imagine how thick our artillery is, alla long the whole line too, the same way. Thank the folks for me for sending the parcel, but it will take another week perhaps for it to come. You mention my tiring of reading your letter. Don’t worry, I wouldn’t if you all wrote every day.  A letter from home these days is a sure cure for a sore foot or game leg. I’m always on the job, when mail arrives around here. Don’t expect me to write too often, but I will do my best.
Bruce.
Bruce returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Montreal on May 22. He returned to Malahide where he was a farmer at the time of his marriage on September 6, 1920 in London to Edith Mildred Howse (1897-1977), of Malahide, the daughter of Frederick Howse & Adeline Bagnall.
Bruce died on November 30, 1964 in Hamilton,  and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.
Bruce’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 2, 1964:
R. BRUCE VAN PATTER
While riding to his work at a Tamblyn Drug Store in Hamilton on Monday morning, R. Bruce VanPatter, former Aylmer postmaster and druggist died suddenly. He was in his 69th year.  Mr. VanPatter was a son of the late John VanPatter and Elizabeth Hall. He was born in Malahide Township on May 24, 1896.  He was well-known as a druggist. He served his apprenticeship with the Aylmer firm of Caughell & Company and graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy.  He practiced his profession for 22 years at Comber, Ont., and in Aylmer for several years. Appointed postmaster of Aylmer, he served here for 15 years until he retired three years ago and resumed his profession as a druggist.
Enlisting in World War 1, Mr. VanPatter served overseas with the Canadian Army. He was a member of Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion, a former member of Malahide Lodge No. 140 AF & AM, and a member of St. Paul’s United Church.
Surviving are his wife, the former Edith Howse; three sons, Keith of London; Milton of Hamilton; Lynwood of Toronto, and one daughter, Mrs. Calvin (Virginia) Jaeger of Hamilton; three brothers, George of RR 3 St. Thomas; Hugh of Montreal; John of RR 8 St. Thomas, and a sister, Mrs. Morris (May) Wood of Kingston.  There are also nine grandchildren.
Service will be held at the Barnum & Kebbel Funeral Home Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Burial in Aylmer cemetery.

Rev. James Grant Vanslyke

507237  James Grant Vanslyke
The name “Grant Vanslyke”  is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.
James Grant Vanslyke was born on July 18, 1891 near Port Bruce in Malahide, the son of John Wesley Vanslyke (1851-1937) & Florence A. Lawton (1859-1952).  John was born in Yarmouth Township, the son of James Vanslyke & Catherine McConnell, and was farming in Malahide when he was married on December 26, 1877 in Port Bruce to Florence Lawton, a native of Windsor living in Port Bruce, the daughter of James & Elison Lawton. John & Florence are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Grant was a student in Toronto living at 66 Yorkville Ave., when he enlisted for service there on June 22, 1916.  He had been a Private for two years in the C.O.T.C.
Grant returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 5.  He was ordained as a minister and was living in Beachville in Oxford County when he was married on June 28, 1923 in Toronto to Jean Dorothy Mimms [or Minns], of Toronto, the daughter of Joseph Mimms & Jennie Richardson.
Rev. Vanslyke was minister at the Perth Baptist Church, Perth, Ontario in the 1930s.
Rev. Vanslyke died on February 28, 1950 in his 59th year, at Niagara Falls.  His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, March 2, 1950:
REV. J. G. VANSLYKE PASSES AT NIAGARA
Well-Known Retired Minister Was Native of Malahide
Aylmer, Mar. 2 – Rev. James Grant Vanslyke, who died Tuesday in the Greater Niagara General Hospital at Niagara Falls, Ont., was a native of Malahide township and after receiving his lower school education in the township, came to Aylmer and graduated from the Aylmer High School. He graduated from the McMaster University in 1920 and held pastorates of the Baptist Church for 20 years in Beachville and Perth. Retiring six years ago, he became chief operator of the Welland Works of the North American Cymanide Company. The deceased, a son of Mrs. Florence Vanslyke and the late John Vanslyke, was in his 59th year and resided at 1893 Murray street, Niagara Falls.  He leaves to mourn his wife, Mrs. Jean Minns Vanslyke; one daughter, Dorothy, at home; one son, Arthur, of Campbellton, N.B.; his mother, Mrs. Vanslyke; two sisters, Mrs. John Liddle, Mrs. Clarke Liddle, of Aylmer; two brothers, Roy Vanslyke, of Aylmer, and Harvey Vanslyke, Victoria, B.C.  The remains are resting at the Morse & Son chapel in Niagara Falls where service will be conducted on Friday at 2 p.m.  Interment will be made in Fairview cemetery.

John Harvey Vanslyke

334531  John Harvey Vanslyke
John Harvey Vanslyke was born on August 21, 1898 in Elgin County, probably Malahide, the son of John Wesley Vanslyke (1851-1937) & Florence A. Lawton (1859-1952).  John W. Vanslyke was born in Yarmouth, the son of James Vanslyke & Catherine McConnell, and was farming in Malahide when he was married on December 26, 1877 at Port Bruce to Florence Lawton, a native of Windsor living in Port Bruce, the daughter of James & Elison Lawton.  John & Florence are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
John H. Vanslyke was a clerk living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on May 22, 1917 in London.
He later moved to Edmonton where he was living when his father died in 1937.  No further information is known.

Lester Milton Vardon

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The name “Lester Vardon”  is found on an Honor Roll unveiled at the Aylmer High School on May 23, 1918, listing students and former students who served overseas.
Lester Milton Vardon was born on December 8, 1897 at Springford in South Norwich Township, Oxford county, the son of Elbert Tennyson Vardon & Maggie Susan Smith.  Elbert was born in Cainsville, the son of Anthony D. & Electa Vardon, and was a teacher living in Springford when he was married on May 23, 1893 in St. Thomas to Maggie Smith, a native of Burford living in Tillsonburg, the daughter of James Secord & Susan Smith.  The family is found on the 1901 census in South Norwich, but by 1911 had moved to Aylmer where on that census, Elbert is employed as a freight clerk.  The family later moved to Toronto.
Lester was living with his parents at 142 Evelyn Ave., Toronto when he enlisted for service there on March 1, 1917.  He was a student and had been a Private in the C.O.T.C. for two years.
Lester was married to Florence May Thompson and had three children: Mary Elizabeth, John Lester & Nancy May.  Lester died on May 18, 1969 in Toronto.

William Martin Veitch

457
William Veitch was born on March 24, 1888 at Duns, Berwickshire, Scotland, the son of David & Grace Veitch.  He emigrated to Canada in 1913, leaving Glasgow on the ship Pretorian, and arriving in Halifax on March 27.  The passenger list gives his occupation as civil engineer.
William enlisted for service on September 23, 1914 at Valcartier.  His address is not given, but he names his next of kin as David Veitch of Duns, Berwickshire.  His occupation is a civil & mechanical engineer.  He had served four years with the Royal Engineers Territorials.
William died in 1979. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 18, 1979:
WILLIAM M. VEITCH
Lieut-Col. William Martin Veitch, former consulting engineer to the Town of Aylmer and former City Engineer for London, Ont., died Friday at Victoria Hospital London in his 93rd year. He worked in Aylmer in the 1950s. He is survived by three sons, David of Ottawa; William and Ian and a daughter, Isobel, all of London. The funeral was held Saturday from the George E. Logan and Sons Funeral Home with burial in Woodland Cemetery, London. He served in the Canadian Army engineers in the Second Great War and was also a soldier in the First Great War.

Abram Vidamour

Abram Vidamour was born about 1883 in the parish of St. Saviour, Guernsey Island, one of the Channel Islands, the son of Thomas & Lavinia Vidamour.  The family is found there on the 1891 and 1901 census.
Abram was still living in Guernsey during the war. He served four years with the Royal Guernsey Light Infantry. He emigrated to Canada in the early 1920s, settling on lot 16, concession 9, Malahide, near Springfield.  He was married to Mary Moore (1883-1922), also a native of the Island of Guernsey, and daughter of William Moore & Mary LeLechuer. Mary Vidamour died on May 30, 1922 in Malahide and is buried in Aylmer cemetery (no monument found). Abram was later married to Clara Neville, who survived him.
Abram died on March 28, 1953 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.  A military monument with the following inscription marks his resting place:
“Abram Vidamour Private R. Guernsey Lt. Int.  28 Mar 1953 age 70″
Abram’s obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, March 30, 1953:
ABRAM VIDAMOUR PASSES IN HOSPITAL
Resident of Aylmer and District For Many Years
Aylmer – A resident of Aylmer and district for the past 20 years, Abram Vidamour died Saturday  night in the St. Thomas Memorial Hospital.  He had been ill for the past two years and seriously sick for a month.  He was in his 71st year.  Mr. Vidamour was born in Guernsey, Channel Islands, a son of the late Mr and Mrs Thomas Vidamour.  He was a retired Malahide Township farmer and came to this district from Saskatchewan. For a time, before entering hospital, he had been living in Essex. A veteran of World War 1, Mr. Vidamour served with the Royal Guernsey Light Infantry for four years.  He was a member of Branch 41 of the Canadian Legion, St. Thomas, and a member of the Church of England.  Surviving are his wife, the former Clara Neville; five sons, R. A. Vidamour, of Aylmer; Stanley G. Vidamour, of St. Thomas; L. G. Vidamour, of Essex; Randolph (Vidamour) Clark, of Thedford; Hubert (Vidamour) Mann, in England; two daughters, Mrs. G. S. (Olive) Gallagher, of Kenmore, N.Y.; Mrs. Charles (Gladys) Hodgkin, of Straffordvlle; one brother, Thomas Vidamour, of Le Gron, Guernsey Island, and four grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.  At rest at the Hughson Funeral Home, Aylmer, where service will be held Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Interment in the family plot in Aylmer cemetery. Rev. T. Dale Jones, of Trinity Anglican Church, Aylmer, will officiate.

Louis Earl Vincent

190145
Louis Earl Vincent was born on October 6, 1896 in Aylmer, the son of Peter Alexander Vincent (1835-1918) & Hannah Maria Mitchell (1850-1931).  Peter was born in Welland County, the son of Thomas Vincent & Floy Dell. Hannah was born at Maple Grove in Bayham township, the daughter of Thomas Mitchell & Catherine Eichenburg.  Peter & Hannah are buried in Springfield cemetery.
Louis Earl was a blacksmith living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on November 1, 1916 in London.  He had served two weeks in the 30th Battery, and two months in the 91st Battalion.
Earl moved to Windsor where he died on December 18, 1973.  He is buried in Victoria Memorial Park Cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Windsor Star, December 19, 1973:
VINCENT – Earl, 77 years, December 18, 1973, late of 1632 Goyeau St. Survived by a niece-in-law Mrs. Reynard Vincent of St. Clair Beach and 2 nephews in Springfield, Ontario. Dear friend of Mrs. Martha Hoffenpreadie of Windsor. Resting at the Anderson Funeral Home, 895 Ouellette Ave. Funeral service Thursday, December 20 at 1:30 p.m. Rev. C. Congram officiating. Interment Victoria Memorial Park Cemetery. A Masonic service will be held Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. under the auspices of Palace Lodge No. 604 A.F. and A.M.

William James Vyse

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William Vyse was born on March 17, 1897 in Port Burwell, the son of Frank Vyse & Olive Partlow.  Frank was born in Walsingham township, the son of Edward & Amanda Vyse, and was farming in Bayham when he was married there on June 9, 1894 to Olive Partlow, of Bayham, the daughter of James & Margaret Partlow.
William was farming at RR #1 Mount Elgin with his parents when he enlisted for service on June 13, 1918 in London.
He was an engineer living at Mount Elgin when he was married on October 4, 1922 at Springford in Oxford County to Edna May Pressey, a native of Fairground living in Mount Elgin, the daughter of John Pressey & Sarah Long.
William died on April 21, 1968 in Ingersoll, and is buried in Ingersoll Rural Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 24, 1968:
WILLIAM J. VYSE
William J. Vyse, Ingersoll, died Sunday at Alexandra Hospital, Ingersoll.  He was 71.  He was born in Bayham Township, the son of the late Mr and Mrs Frank Vyse.  Surviving are his wife, the former Edna Pressey; six daughters, Mrs. Jack (Helen) Donmoyer of Woodstock; Mrs. Jack (Shirley) Hudson of St. Catharines; Mrs. Donald (Marjorie) Cooke of London; Mrs. Lee (Olive) Fielder of Ingersoll; Mrs. David (Catherine) McAlister of Watford; Miss Judith Vyse at home; six sons, Harry of RR 4 Ingersoll; William of Listowel; Donald of Ingersoll; James of Downsview; Gary and David, both at home; four brothers, Earl of Port Burwell; Harry of Mount Elgin; Fred of London; Lewis of Tillsonburg.
Service was held in Ingersoll on Tuesday afternoon. Burial was in the Ingersoll Rural Cemetery.

Henry Walcarius

2448374  Henry Walcarius
Henry Walcarius was born on February 27, 1892 in Zedelghem, Belgium, the son of Edward Walcarius.
He emigrated to Canada in August 1913, and was living at Kingsville in Essex County, employed as a farm labourer when he enlisted for service on May 23, 1917 in Windsor.  His brother had been killed in action while serving with a regiment in Belgium, and this prompted Henry to enlist.
Henry received a gunshot wound to his arm after nine months full duty in France, but was able to return to his regiment.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 24.  He was discharged on March 29, 1919.
While in France, Henry met his future wife, Martha Vandewalle (1897-1979), who was a refugee from Belgium living in France.  They were married in Belgium, and she joined him in Canada a short time after his return to Essex County. They later moved to Elgin County and farmed near Mount Salem.
Henry died on August 15, 1948 and is buried in Queen of Peace Cemetery, Aylmer. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 19, 1948:
INJURIES FATAL TO MT. SALEM TOBACCO MAN
Henri Edward Walcarius, Mount Salem tobacco grower and a well-known resident of the East Elgin district, died in the Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital at Tillsonburg Sunday.  He suffered a fractured hip and internal injuries Tuesday of the previous week when he fell from a shelter he was erecting on his farm in preparation for the harvest.
Solemn requiem high mass was sung at the Church of Our Lady of Sorrows Tuesday morning at ten o’clock with Rev. S. E. White as celebrant, Rev. Hugh Fleming as deacon and Rev. Joseph O’Rourke of Port Dover as sub-deacon.  Rev. Albert Spencer of Tillsonburg was master of ceremonies.  Interment followed in Our Lady of Peace Cemetery, Aylmer. Rev. J. H. O’Neill of Tillsonburg assisted at the grave.
Mr. Walcarius was born in Belgium on February 27, 1892 and as a young man came to Canada to the Windsor district, where he enlisted in the Canadian Army on May 23, 1917, and during the First Great War he served in England and France with the Canadian Mounted Rifles and on returning to Canada was discharged in March of 1919.
The departed man went to the Tillsonburg district in 1930 and five years ago moved to Mount Salem, where he has been a prominent tobacco grower.
Surviving are his wife, the former Miss Martha Vandewalle; two sons, Algar and Edgar, at home; one daughter, Mary Rose, at home; one brother, Emiel, and one sister, Emma, both in Belgium.
The remains rested at the Jas. H. Barnum Funeral Home until removal to Our Lady of Sorrows Church.  A large number of friends and relatives gathered for the services and there were many floral tributes.  Pallbearers were Alphonse Plaquet, Carl Vangoethen, Camiel Deforche, Camiel Beernaert, Q. H. Cook and Boyd Wilson. Friends and relatives attended from La Salette, Tillsonburg, Delhi, Detroit, Simcoe, Langton, Port Dover, Norwich, St. Thomas, Port Burwell, Illinois and Aylmer and vicinity.

Arthur Walker

189593
The name “Arthur Walker” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, Vienna.
Arthur Walker was born on October 24, 1890 in Bayham, the son of Charles Henry Walker (1867-1959) & Amelia Hall (1872-1946), of Port Burwell.  Henry was born in Beverly Township, the son of Ira & Margaret Walker, and was a brickmaker living in Port Burwell when he was married there on November 9, 1889 to Amelia Hall, a native of Bayham living in Houghton township, the daughter of Charles & Matilda Hall.  Henry & Amelia are buried in Trinity Cemetery, Port Burwell.
Arthur enlisted for service on December 9, 1915 with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas.  He was a farmer, and gives his address at P. O. Port Burwell. He names his next of kin as his mother, Amelia, of R.R. #6 Tillsonburg.
Arthur returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Quebec on October 7.
Before returning to Canada, Arthur was married in Middlesex, England in 1918 to Emma (Emily) F. Seaton.  Passenger lists show an Emily Walker, age 30, married woman, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick from England on February 17, 1919.  Her destination was Tillsonburg.
Arthur resided in Port Burwell following the war, and was accidentally drowned at Port Stanley on June 25, 1931.  He was employed as a scowman dredger for the Department of Public Works.
Arthur & Emily had three children.  A son, William Henry, died in 1922 at the age of 2 years and is buried beside his father in Trinity Cemetery.  There were also two daughters: Josephine Flora Amelia (Mrs. John Williams Froggett), and Edythe (Mrs. Wilfred Vale).
He is buried in Trinity Cemetery, Port Burwell. His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 26, 1931:
DREDGE WORKER IS DROWNED NEAR PORT STANLEY HARBOR
Arthur Walker, of Port Burwell, Loses Life When the Winding
Apparatus Fails, Throwing Him Into Water;
Toronto Man is Rescued
Veteran of the World War and a married man with two children, Arthur Walker, aged 38 years, of Port Burwell, was drowned at Port Stanley, shortly after five o’clock, Thursday evening, when he fell or was thrown from a Department of Public Works scow, while engaged in winding up a funnel of the scow. The body was recovered from the lake about eight o’clock Thursday evening. Peter Solomon, Toronto man, also engaged in dredging work at Port Stanley, narrowly escaped a similar fate. He was thrown from the scow with Walker and rescued with some difficulty. He was not injured. The drowning is the first of the season at Port Stanley and the first fatality from this dredge in ten years.
Witnesses reported that Walker came up only once and did not cry out, which suggests that he was knocked unconscious in falling into the lake. The fatality occurred near the lighthouse at the end of the east pier, in about 18 feet of water. There are a number of large rocks, some submerged, at the end of the pier. Walker was unable to swim, fellow workers said.  Coroner Dr. Jackson, of Port Stanley, has ordered an inquest.
Cause of Accident
The scow, from which the two men fell into the lake was in tow of the tug, Hercules, at the time and was returning from dumping a load of dredgings from the harbor bed. Members of the crew were engaged in pulling up the funnels or bottom of the scow by means of long pipes inserted in a lifting apparatus operated by a catch-pulley. The “dog” on the cog-wheel failed to catch when the funnel was partly lifted, causing the wheel to fly back with such force as to precipitate Walker and Solomon into the water. They were standing on the slippery edge of the deck, which is only about two feet wide, at the time.
The distress signals were sounded immediately, brought the life-saving crew, under Selbourne Taylor, lighthouse keeper, tot he scene within five minutes. The members of the life-saving crew were commended for their prompt response.
The victim of the accident had been an employee of the Public Works Department for four years, being a member of the crew of the dredge, No. 117. He enlisted with the 91st Battalion in this city and went overseas with that unit. He is survived by his widow and two daughters, aged 16 and 18 years, all residents of Port Burwell. The body is being taken to the young man’s late home in Port Burwell Friday, and the funeral will take place Sunday at three o’clock in Trinity Anglican church, Rev. J. H. Kerr, the rector, officiating, and interment in Trinity cemetery.

Ellis Rederick Walker

189942  Ellis Walker
photo courtesy of Elgin County Archives
Ellis Walker was born on October 20, 1896 in Port Burwell, the son of James Rederick Walker (1871-1959) & Mary Mariah Armstrong (1877-1957).  James was born in Bayham, the son of Adam Ira Walker & Margaret Smith, and was a fisherman there when he was married on March 5, 1893 in Port Burwell to Mary Armstrong, of Bayham, daughter of John Archibald Armstrong & Sarah Catherine Brandow.  James & Mary are buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue.
Ellis was a fisherman living in Port Burwell when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on February 2, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He had served two years in the 39th Regiment.  Ellis sailed with the 91st Battalion from Halifax to England on June 29, 1916.  On July 15, 1916, he was transferred to the 12th Battalion, and on August 28 of that year was again transferred to the 2nd Battalion and sent to France.  He was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal on November 18, 1917. On April 10, 1918, he was promoted to the rank of Corporal.  He received a gunshot wound to his right leg on September 28, 1918, and was awarded the Military Medal. He was invalided to a hospital in England on October 6, 1918. By December 23, 1918, he was declared fit for duty and was posted to the 1st Canadian Command Depot. However, by January 1919 he was dispatched to Canada and sailed from Liverpool on January 29.
A poem written by Ellis was printed in the St. Thomas Journal, July 7, 1917:
When we Elgin boys go back to rest, we clean our brass and look our best
The Sergeant takes us on parade, for bay’net practice, the order’s made.
We double out with all our might and quick begin the bayonet fight.
The short Enfield’s our weapon keen, the sights are shining, bright and clean;
Quick and sharp our bay’nets dart, ready to pierce a German’s heart.
Back we march to the home we own, for a bit of meat with lots of bone,
And when we end our little meal, we sit around and have a “spiel.”
Funny yarns and homely rhymes help to fill the idle times
Until the Sergeant howls “Fall in!” and out we go for another spin.
Tell you what, the hours pass slow, till we hear the welcome bugle’s blow,
For then we get out cup of tea and know for the evening we are free
Down town for us to spend the night, but, good for us, we never get tight.
I think that is all that I can say, but you young fellows should come this way.
You’re just too slow to enter the fight in the Great War for Freedom’s right,
The biggest ever Briton’s fought, so come and do just what you ought.
You young fellows should get fit and come and do your little bit.
I came out here last year in June, but didn’t arrive an hour too soon
To see by far the best advance the Canadians ever made in France.
There’s plenty of sport in making a name and all our fellows play the game;
For the life of me, I can only shout, “Why can’t you young boys help us out?”
In this greatest war of all, why don’t you come at your country’s call?
Pte E. R. Walker
2nd Battalion, C.E.F. France
No. 189942
Corporal Walker returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on February 5. He was discharged on February 27, 1919 in London. He was also awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
Following the war, he was farming in Malahide when he was married on June 8, 1921 in Aylmer to Mildred Valeta Kelley (1903-1986), of Malahide, the daughter of Thomas Kelley & Isola Minard.
Ellis died on October 29, 1979 and is buried with his wife in Orwell cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 31, 1979:
ELLIS REDRICK WALKER
Ellis Redrick Walker, 83, of RR 5 Aylmer, died Monday, October 29 at St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. Mr. Walker was born in Port Burwell on October 20, 1896. He was the son of the late James and Mary (Armstrong) Walker. He had been a labourer at the Elgin Co-op and had lived in Orwell since 1945.  Mr. Walker served with the 91st Battalion during World War I and was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion in St. Thomas.
Surviving are his wife, the former Mildred Kelly; sons, James of Latchford; Ray of St. Thomas; Howard of London; Marwin of Latchford; and Ron of London; daughters Mrs. Alfred (Helen) Austin of Turkey Point; Mrs. William (Doris) McGregor of Buffalo, New York; and Mrs. Carl (Pauline) Chute of Middlemarch; brother Kenneth Walker of Cambridge; sisters Mrs. Frank (Beatrice) Fredette of Taylor, Michigan; Mrs. Ken (Kathleen) Pelkey of London; Mrs. Mable Jackson of Michigan and Mrs. Etheldia McIntyre of London, Ont. Also surviving are a number of grandchildren.
The funeral was held Wednesday, October 31 from the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home. Rev. J. L. Petrie, padre of the St. Thomas branch of the Royal Canadian Legion conducted the service. Burial was made in the Orwell cemetery.

Frederick Allan Walker

2537353
Frederick Walker was born on April 30, 1890 in Aylmer, the son of William James Walker (died 1918 in Buffalo) & Lillie Drysdale.  William was the son of John & Deborah Walker and was a merchant in Aylmer when he was married in Perth, Lanark County on April 26, 1888 to Lillie Drysdale, of Perth, daughter of Alex & Martha Drysdale.
Frederick was a salesman living with his mother at 618 Masten Street, Buffalo, New York when he enlisted for service on June 18, 1917 in Toronto.
He was married on September 11, 1920 in Ottawa to Verna Margaret Jamieson of Winford Lake, Quebec, daughter of James Jamieson & Isabella McBrice.  He was living at 309 Somerset Street West, Ottawa, and was a traveler.
Frederick died in July 1946 and is buried with his mother in Woodland Cemetery, Flamborough Township, Wentworth County.

Harry Walker

190209
Harry Walker was born on January 21, 1878 in Feltwell, Norfolk England, the son of John Walker & Hannah Tuck, who were married in Norfolk, England in 1876. John & Hannah were both born in Lakenhearth, Suffolk, England. The family is found in English census records in Feltwell, Norfolk from 1881 through 1901.
Harry emigrated to Canada in 1910 and is found on the 1911 census in  Malahide where he was working as a hired man on a farm for Charles & Mary Hardy.
He later moved to McKellar in the Parry Sound District where he was living when he was married on October 19, 1914 at McKellar to Margaret Jane Robinson.  She was the widow of Wesley Robinson, and daughter of John Quinn & Hannah Belle Stewart, and operating a boarding house at McKellar.
Harry returned with his wife to Aylmer where they were living when he enlisted for service on March 31, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He had belonged to the 4th Norfolk Regiment in England.
No further information can be found.

Nelson William Walker

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Nelson William Walker was born on February 29, 1888 in Port Burwell, the son of Adam Ira Walker (1862-1945) & Sarah Alice Hall (1861-1935).  Adam Ira Walker was the son of Adam Ira Walker & Margaret Smith, and was a mason living in Bayham when he was married on January 29, 1882 in Port Burwell to Sarah Hall, of Bayham, the daughter of Charles & Matilda Hall.  Ira is buried in Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Port Burwell.
Nelson was an engineer living in St. Thomas when he was married there on October 30, 1917 to Louisa Rixon, a native of London, England living in St. Thomas, the daughter of William Rixon.
Nelson was living at 236 Talbot Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on January 9, 1918. He gives his date of birth as January 29, 1887.
Nelson was accidentally drowned on September 3 or 4, 1937 at Port Dover. He is buried in Port Dover cemetery.  A newspaper article about his death appeared in the Port Dover Maple Leaf, September 10, 1937:
BODY OF ENGINEER NELSON WALKER FOUND IN RIVER
Missing from Thursday night until his lifeless body was churned up in the river Saturday afternoon as the tug M & K was turning near the bridge, Nelson Walker, engineer on the tug Dorothea D. (owned by Tom Lowe and operated by Cpt. Dan McDonald) met death by drowning. He had been in Port Dover only a week, and it is surmised that he returned to his boat late Thursday night to carry out necessary work in order to make an early start to the fishing grounds Friday morning, when he fell overboard t his death. Alarm was caused Friday morning when it was found and the syphon pumps were also operating but no trace of the engineer could be found after a close check-up.
Saturday afternoon Constable McNeilly notified the Provincial authorities that Walker was missing and dragging operations were just being undertaken by the tug Bobby Nicholas when the body was sighted in the swirling waters by Wilfred Desjardines and Les Murphy. Coroner Dr. Struthers viewed the body and from the evidence given pronounced death due to accidental drowning. The body was taken to Thompson’s Undertaking Parlors.
Deceased was the son of Arthur [sic] Walker and the late Mrs. Walker of Port Burwell.  One brother, and two sisters, of Port Burwell, also survive.
Funeral in Charge Can. Legion
Funeral services were held from the residence of W. B. Thompson on Monday afternoon, being in charge of Port Dover Branch of the Canadian Legion. Rev. W. F. Mahaffy of Grace United Church officiated at the service at the house and later at Port Dover cemetery, where interment took place.  The casket was graced by a number of beautiful floral tributes, including those from the crew of the tug Dorothea D., Port Dover Women’s Institute, Canadian Legion, and Legion Auxiliary. Pall bearers were Legionnaires Bridgwater, Shand, Hoskins, Sharman, Down and Ed. Steele.

Thomas Harold Walker

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Harold Walker was born on March 3, 1891 in Kinloss Township, Bruce County, the son of William Walker (1860-1923) and Helena Grace Epplett (1864-1932).  William was born in Turnberry Township, Huron County, the son of James & Susanna Walker, and was a school teacher in Wroxeter when he was married there on December 31, 1884 to Helena Epplett, also of Turnberry, the daughter of John Epplett & Esther Eliza Henning.  William moved to Bayham township where the family appears on the 1901 and 1911 census.  He was a school teacher there and a fruit grower.  William & Helena later moved to London where they lived at 776 Queen’s Ave.
Harold was employed as a railway brakeman and was living at 514 Charlotte Street, London, when he enlisted there for service on May 30, 1917.  He was not married, and names his next of kin as his father, William, of Port Burwell.
Harold returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on May 25.  He moved back to Port Burwell, and was a railway employee there when he was married on December 9, 1920 in Port Burwell to Iva McAllister, also of Port Burwell, the daughter of Robert McAllister & Ellen Mooney.
He died on October 9, 1961 and is buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, October 10, 1961:
T. H. WALKER, 70, EX-RAILMAN, DIES
Thomas Harold Walker, 70, of 827 Quebec St., died yesterday in London. He had lived here for 40 years.  Mr. Walker retired as a conductor on the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1956. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and of Knollwood Park Baptist Church.  He was overseas in the First World War with a field battery unit, and was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion in Toronto.
Surviving are his wife, the former Iva McAllister; one daughter, Mrs. Marion Ewanski, Toronto; a brother, Howard Walker, London; five sisters, Mrs. Harry (Susan) Cookson, Port Burwell; Mrs. Ernest (May) Hays, Port Perry; Mrs. Kirt (Edith) Patterson, Grosse Point Woods, Mich.; Miss Ethel Walker, London; Mrs. Sidney (Betty) Febrey, Thorndale; and six grandchildren. One daughter, Mrs. Norman (Margaret) McBeth, London, predeceased him.
Funeral will be held Thursday at 3:30 p.m. with Rev. F. C. Howard officiating. Burial will be in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.

William Stephen Walker

190214  William Stephen Walker
William Walker was born on January 24, 1893 in Dutton, the son of William Stephen Walker (1865-1927) & Mary Morris (1865-1940).  William Walker Sr. was born in Hamilton, the son of John & Sarah Walker and was a stone cutter living in West Lorne when he was married there on July 29, 1889 to Mary Morris, a native of London living in West Lorne, the daughter of Joseph & Mary Morris.  William & Mary are buried in Aylmer cemetery, with a daughter Margaret (1894-1973), whom William mentions in a letter home, below.  The family moved to Aylmer when William was a child, and they are found on the 1901 and 1911 census there.
William was living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on March 31, 1916 in St. Thomas. He names his next of kin as his mother, Mary, of Aylmer.  He was a farmer, and belonged to the 30th Battery C.F.A. for one year.
William’s photo with the following caption appeared in the East Elgin Tribune, September 21, 1916: “Pte. W. S. Walker, 190214, B. Co., 39th Batt., Army P.O. London, England, is a son of Mr and Mrs W. S. Walker, Forest street, Aylmer. He was born in the village of Dutton in 1892 and has lived in Aylmer nearly all his life. Previous to enlisting, Pte. Walker was employed at Price’s planing mill. He was also a member of the 30th Battery”.
A photo of William with the following caption was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916: “Pte. W. S. Walker, son of Mr and Mrs. W. S. Walker, was born in the village of Dutton in 1892 and has lived in Aylmer all his life. He enlisted with the 91st Batt., but since he arrived in France, no word has been received from him. He was a member of the 30th Battery previous to enlisting”.
A letter from William to his parents was printed in the Aylmer Express, February 15, 1917:
PTE. WALKER HAS BEEN ILL WITH RHEUMATIC FEVER
Mr and Mrs Wm. Walker, Have Received the Following Letter From Their Son,
Who Went Overseas With the 91st Battalion
Somewhere in France, Dec. 25, 1916
Dear Sister, Mother and Father –
I thought I would write a few lines to let you know I am well again. I have been in the hospital for about three weeks. I was sent there with rheumatic fever. I was taken with the fever while in the trenches, and when we came out they sent me to the hospital. This is some place, and they certainly look after you. I had a fine time there. We are in the town now, and our ( C ) company have just returned from Christmas dinner. We had some dinner: everything we wanted to eat. I hope you all had a happy Christmas. I wish I was there to join you, but will not be there this Christmas, but I hope I will be home soon. I have escaped all the shots and shells so far, and hope I will come through all right.
Well Margaret, I have just received your letter dated October 24th, and have not had any since. You said I would get the parcel before the letter, but I have not received it yet. I think it will come through. They are so busy with the mail that it is late every day. I thank you very much for the parcel, and if you send another one, send cigarettes instead of cigars, as we all smoke them over here. How is mother?  Tell her not to worry about me for I am all right and have gained almost fifteen pounds, and have a fine moustache, one that curls up at the ends, like dad’s. You would not know me if I came home. This is some country to get fat in. It seems to agree with me and I am feeling fine now.
I suppose mother is receiving her money each month. I get enough money to spend over here, so don’t worry about me not getting any.  How is Bert Youngs and George Wall getting along. I suppose they miss me some when I don’t visit the dog house. How is dad getting along. I suppose the old town is the same as ever. Tell mother and dad not to worry about me for I will look after myself as best I can.
Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,
190214 Pte. W. S. Walker, C. Co. 24th Batt. (Canadians), France
The Aylmer Express of April 25, 1918 reports the following: “Mr and Mrs W. S. Walker, received a telegram on Monday, informing them that their son, Pte. Wm. Walker, has been wounded in France. The extent of his injuries is not yet known but he received shrapnel wounds, about the face, arms and legs.  He is now in a base hospital in France.  Pte. Walker enlisted and went overseas with the 91st Battalion, and for many months has been on active service in France.”
A photograph of William with the following caption was printed in the Aylmer Express, October 17, 1918:
Pte. W. S. Walker, son of Mr and Mrs William Walker, who was one of the five men to return home from overseas last week. Pte. Walker enlisted and went to England with the 91st Battalion on June 25th, 1916, and a few months later was in France. He has had many narrow escapes, having been blown into the air on several occasions, but escaping with a severe shaking up. He was through the fight at the Somme and was severely wounded at Vimy Ridge. Pte. Walker had been through nine days on continuous bombardment from Fritz, and when coming out of the trenches, six miles behind the front lines, a stray shell exploded very close to him, when he received severe wounds in the face, head and knee. After many months in the hospital in England, he has been returned to Canada for further treatment which he will receive at Guelph.
Following the war, William returned to Aylmer where he was employed as a crossing watchman when he was married on October 20, 1920 to Flossie Millard, a native of Bayham living in Aylmer, the daughter of Squire Millard & Louise Robinson.
William died in 1962 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His resting place is marked with a military monument bearing the following inscription:
 “William S. Walker Private 91 Battn C.E.F.  20 Jan 1962 age 69
William’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, January 31, 1962:
WILLIAM S. WALKER
St. Thomas – William Stephen Walker Sr., of R.R. 6 St. Thomas (Wellington Road), died Saturday afternoon, Jan. 20, in the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital after a lengthy illness.  He was 69.  Mr. Walker was born in Dutton and as a child moved to Aylmer. He came to St. Thomas in 1939. During World War I he served overseas with the 91st Battalion and was wounded at Vimy Ridge.  He was an adherent of Centre Street Baptist Church. His parents were the late William S. Walker and Mrs. Mary Morris Walker.  Mr. Walker is survived by his wife, Mrs. Flossie (Millard) Walker, at home; two sons, William Walker Jr. at home, and Jack Walker, of Orillia; three daughters, Mrs. Albert (Helen) Hayward of RCAF Station, Clinton; Mrs. Samuel (Donna) Shearing, of 20 Fourth Avenue, St. Thomas, and Mrs. John (Marjorie) Smith, of 29 Owaissa Street; one sister, Miss Margaret Walker of Aylmer; and five grandchildren.  Mr. Walker was predeceased by a brother, John, of Galt.  Service was held on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 22, at the L. B. Sifton Funeral Home. Rev. R. D. Harmer of Centre Street Baptist Church officiated.  Interment was in Aylmer Cemetery

John Edward Wall

190289
Edward Wall was born on September 22, 1887 in Malahide, the son of John David Wall (1869-1936) & Cynthia Ann Perry (1864-1948).  John D. Wall was the son of James Wall & Delilah Ferguson, and was living in Aylmer when he was married there on February 25, 1885 to Cynthia Perry, of Malahide, daughter of James & Maria Perry.  John & Cynthia are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Edward was living at Griffins Corners when he was married on May 15, 1907 at Eden to Agnes Catharine Millard, of Eden, daughter of Oliver F. Millard & Syrina Montross.
They moved to Aylmer where Edward was employed as a baker when he enlisted for service on March 30, 1916 in St. Thomas.
He died on August 7, 1965 at the age of 76, and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 11, 1965:
EDWARD JOHN WALL
A well-known and lifelong resident of Aylmer, Edward John Wall, of Four Avenue, was laid to rest in the Aylmer Cemetery Monday afternoon following service at the Hughson Funeral Home.  Mr. Wall died Saturday morning in the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. He had been failing for about a year. A son of the late Mr and Mrs John Wall, he was born 76 years ago and was a plasterer by trade. He was a member of the Baptist church.
His wife, the former Aggie Millard of St. Thomas, survives with one daughter, Mrs. Celeste Tonks of St. Thomas; two brothers, William and Melburne of Aylmer; one sister, Mrs. Effie Roloson of Aylmer and a number of nieces and nephews. The Rev. Clifford West of the Aylmer United Missionary Church conducted the service during which Mrs. James Wright presided at the organ.  Pallbearers were F. D. Dowding, George Buckner, Ivan Sivyer, Cliff Martin, Arnold Ward and Charles Mitchell. Friends and relatives attended from St. Thomas, Belmont, Wallacetown, Fingal, Aylmer and district.

George Arthur Wall

3131362
George Wall was born on June 19, 1897 at Mount Salem in Malahide,  the son of John David Wall (1869-1936) & Cynthia Ann Perry (1864-1948).  John D. Wall was the son of James Wall & Delilah Ferguson, and was living in Aylmer when he was married there on February 25, 1885 to Cynthia Perry, of Malahide, daughter of James & Maria Perry.  John & Cynthia are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
George was a shoemaker living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on January 5, 1918 in London. He returned from overseas on June 4, 1919, arriving in Quebec.
He was married on January 5, 1920 in Aylmer to Florence Catharine Schram, of Aylmer, daughter of David Schram & Florence Broughton.
George died on August 15, 1959, and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Simcoe.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 20, 1959:
GEORGE A. WALL WAS BORN HERE
George Arthur Wall, R.R. 3 Simcoe, died suddenly on Saturday at his Woodhouse township home in his 63rd year.  Son of the late John Wall and Cynthia Perry, he was born at Aylmer and married here in 1920 to Florence Catherine Schram.  A veteran of the First World War, he served in France with the 44th Battalion, 1916-1919, and received the British War and Victory Medals.  He was an adherent of Bethel Baptist Church.  Surviving besides his wife are two sons, George and Wayne at home; two daughters, Mrs. William Pitters (Essie), and Mrs. Allan White (Jean), both of R.R. 7 Simcoe; six grandchildren, four great grandchildren; three brothers, Edward, William and Melburn, of Aylmer; and one sister, Mrs. Essie Jane Roloson of Fingal.  Service was held at the George W. Baldock Funeral Home in Simcoe on Monday with Rev. Norman Pipe of Bethel Baptist Church officiating and interment in the veterans’ plot, Oakwood Cemetery, Simcoe.

Arthur St. John Wallis

84203
Arthur St. John Wallis (sometimes spelled Wallace), was born on March 29, 1892 in York, Yorkshire, England, the son of George James Wallis & Laura Peaty, who were married in London, England in 1881.  The family is found on the 1901 England census living at 9 Longfield Terrace,  Bootham, York, Yorkshire, where George is employed as a pianoforte tuner.
It appears that he was known by the name “John”.  He emigrated to Canada at the age of 21, leaving Liverpool aboard the ship Alsatian, and arrived in Quebec on May 29, 1914.  His destination on the passenger list was Aylmer, and it states that his brother has been farming in Canada for six years. The brother referred to is likely George Wallis, born 1881 in England, who is found on the 1911 Bayham census, a farmer, with wife Mary, and children Alice (1907) and Percy (1909). The census indicates they emigrated to Canada in 1908. John settled in Aylmer where he was employed as a cook and baker.  His name is found in a list of recruits bound for overseas duty, published in the Aylmer Express, Nov. 19, 1914. His attestation paper is dated November 13, 1914 in London.  He names his next of kin as his father, George James Wallis, of 4 Walker Street, Marygate, York, England.  He had served 18 months in the Territorial Army Service Corps.
He is also mentioned in a letter from the “Aylmer boys” while in London awaiting their voyage to England: “Jack Wallis is a good cook and feeds us very well”.  His name is included at the bottom of the letter, “John Wallis, head cook”.
No further information is known.

Bert Walsh

The name Bert Walsh appears on a Springfield Roll of Honor. This man cannot be positively identified. On the 1911 Malahide census in the Springfield area, there is an Edwin Walsh, born October 1888 in Ontario, employed as a domestic servant with Elmer & Minerva Stanton.
In the 1901 North Dorchester Township census, there is a Herbert Welsh, born July 15, 1885 in Ontario, living with Kate Shain, a widow.
No attestation papers can be identified for either man.

Kenneth Raymond Walsh

174791
Kenneth Walsh was born on September 3, 1896 in Aylmer, the son of William Henry Walsh (1866-1936)  & Emma Pearson (1867-1943).  William was born in London, the son of Robert Walsh & Alice Evans and was a barber living in Aylmer when he was married on February 19, 1889 in Jarvis to Emma Pearson, a native of Walpole Township, Haldimand County, living in Jarvis, the daughter of William & Elizabeth Pearson.  William was a barber in Aylmer for several years, and also operated a livery stable there.  The family later moved to Hamilton.
Kenneth was a chemist living in Hamilton when he enlisted there on February 1, 1916.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Emma, of 639 Main Street East, Hamilton. He had served six months in the 91st Signallers.
Passenger lists show a Sgt. K. R. Walsh returning from overseas in 1919, arriving in Quebec on July 8.  No service number is given, and it states his address is Hagersville.
Kenneth was married to Jessie F. MacFarlane (1899-1971).  He died on October 25, 1970 and is buried with his wife and parents are buried in Woodland Cemetery, Flamborough Township, Wentworth County. His obituary appeared in the Hamilton Spectator, October 26, 1970:
WALSH, Kenneth Raymond – At St. Joseph’s Hospital on Sunday, October 25, 1970, after a short illness, Kenneth Raymond Walsh, aged 74 years, beloved husband of Jessie MacFarlane and brother of Mrs. R. S. Stone (Ruby) of Hamilton. Former manager of United Paper Mills Limited, Hamilton. Served as Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, in the First World War. Resting at the Robinson Funeral Home, King East at West Avenue. Service in the Chapel on Wednesday at 11 a.m. Interment Woodland Cemetery.

Alfred George Walter

42765
The St. Thomas Times-Journal, March 31, 1919 reported the return of local soldiers in “The News of Aylmer”: “Alfred Waters, a returned soldier, who was wounded at the front, has returned with his English bride, and spent a couple of days last week with Frank Ingram, very pleasantly, talking over old times at Grovesend”.
It has been determined that this man was Alfred George Walter, who emigrated from England to Canada in 1913 at the age of 21.  He left Liverpool on the ship Ascania, arriving in Portland, Maine on April 13.  His occupation in England was a grocer’s assistant.  His intended occupation in Canada is farming, and his destination was Grovesend, Ontario.
Alfred was born on August 8, 1891 in Leigh, Kent, England, the son of Thomas & Jane Walter.  The family is found on the 1901 census at Warren Farm, Penhurst, Kent.  Alfred’s address is not given on his attestation paper, but he enlisted with the Ammunition Col. of the C.F.A. on September 24, 1914 at Valcartier.  He was not married, and was a cheesemaker.  He names his next of kin as his father, Thomas, of The Warren, Penhurst, Kent.
Alfred wrote a letter to Lewis Hankinson of Grovesend, which was published in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1915:
DESCRIPTIVE LETTER FROM THE SEAT OF WAR
By Alfred Walter, with the First Canadian Contingent.
Received by Mr. L. A. Hankinson, Grovesend
Belgium, Wed. August 25th, 1915
Dear Lewis:
Well here’s a letter from you at last, dated August 8th, so it’s been long enough on the way.  Am sorry everything is so dull, just you wait till I come home again. I’ll waken you up.  I believe I’ll paint the place red when I get out of the army. This life isn’t bad, but it’s a civic life for me, and a little comfort after this.  Everything here is all serene, but oh!, so dull. I wish they’d either fight or let us go home again. We look like stopping at this billet all winter, for we are hauling bricks to use in making horse-lines for the wet weather. We get the bricks from a little village near here which was, and in fact is, being bombarded by the Germ huns.  Gee!  They have made a smash of that place. It’s almost as bad as Ypres.  All that remains of the church are six pillars and the bare, smoke-blackened walls, and in the village itself I don’t believe there is a single house which hasn’t had a shell through it.  It’s almost entirely deserted, but there are a few old people who will not leave the place. They live in cellars and scurry like rabbits to their holes when a shell comes along.
I wish I could put a letter together decently, for I could tell you lots of things, maybe trivial to us, but that would probably interest you. I’ll tell you what we’ll do if you’ll promise not to laugh at me. We will imagine you are riding my off horse and we will go out on an exercise ride together and I’ll try and describe some of the things we see. Coming?  Alright be ready at 6:30 a.m., put on your bandolier and pull your chin strap down. All ready?  Away we go then.
The first thing you will notice will be the numerous windmills around. Well you see, we are just on the frontier and Flanders is the land of windmills. Hold tight. Here comes a Belgium dog-team. Ginger never can understand why dogs should pull carts along and he always wants to put a hedge or ditch between them and himself. He didn’t care to pass autos at first, but he doesn’t mind so much now.  Now we are coming to a village which was in the hands of the Germ huns last December. Note the trenches around some of the houses. A little farther on we shall see some real fine trenches.  Here they are. Aren’t they splendidly made. Notice the barb wire entanglements in front.  Just picture yourself trying to get across that terrible obstacle with maybe a couple of machine guns pumping lead into you.
Here is an Indiana Battery line on your left. See the queer way the fellows squat on the ground. We shall probably see some of them out with their horses later on.
Look!  There’s an “Archibald” (pet-name for an anti-aircraft gun).  You’ll see it is mounted on a big motor lorry in order that it may be quickly moved from place to place. See the scout sitting by his telescope?  Now here on our right is one of our batteries in position, a Canadian one too.  “Where?”  You’ll say “I can’t see it”.  Look closer, there in that hedge.  Aren’t they cleverly hidden?  You see airmen have such keen eyes. Their dug outs, too, are quite artistically built. That telephone wire runs up to the observation station, up some tree, or maybe in the trenches.
Now we are approaching a village, which has been shelled by the Huns.  Look at the great holes in some of the houses and note how shrapnel has peppered the walls. There is work enough to keep a glazier busy a twelve-month or more. It is Sunday morning and the villagers are having their early mass in a tiny hall, much too small for even half their number. Here’s the reason. Look at the church.  Did you ever see such damage in all your life?
Now we turn here and go back to our billet.  Ah!  I thought so. Here come those Indian fellows with their horses. Fine looking chaps they are too. [part of letter appears to be missing from the newspaper, as it continues on another page]
Now we will pay a visit to some people I became acquainted with by going to their place to fill our water wagon.  Here they are and what a dandy home they have. Monsieur is past military service but Madame will tell you of her soldier boy who is in the trenches, and of whom she is so proud. The floor of the house is tiled, and queer pattern stove stands on one side, the furniture is simple but shows good taste and on the walls are a few fine prints, while over all a splendid silver crucifix hangs.  Madame will bustle around and in a few minutes we shall be drinking real French coffee and trying not to burn our fingers on the little basins which they use instead of cups.  Madame will offer you a wee drop of cognac in your coffee and they all will clink basins and wish us all good luck.  Sometimes Madame’s nieces (twins) come around but they haven’t shown up today. They are two pretty girls, aged about sixteen and with figures like a Venus.
Time is flying so we must be going. We’ll get some more cookies and a few ice creams and then “Bon soir” to the town. I hope you have enjoyed your day with me, if so we’ll go again someday. Well, I’m going to finish now with the chorus of a present popular song:
“Keep the home fires burning, tho’ your hearts are yearning
Tho’ the lads are far away, they dream of home
There’s a silver lining, thro’ the dark clouds shining
Turn the dark cloud inside out, till the boys come home”
Please remember me to everybody around.  Yours, Alfred
42765 Driver Alfred Walter, C Sub Section Amm. Col. 3rd Bdge., C.F.A., 1st Can. Expeditionary Force, France.
Alfred returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in St. John’s, Newfoundland on March 24. The passenger list is very blurred, but it appears he gives his destination as Aylmer.
A marriage record was found for an Alfred G. Walter and Emily Dennis in 1918 in the Coventry District, Warwickshire-West Midlands. The Aylmer Express records the birth of a daughter to Alfred Walter of Grovesend on August 19, 1919. No further information can be found.

James Walters

528992  James Walters
James Walters was born on December 27, 1885 [or 1889] in Lound, Nottinghamshire, England, the son of John & Mary (Sarah) Walters.  The family is found on the 1891 England census in Lound, and on the 1901 census, James is a servant in Chelsea, London, England.  His father had died prior to 1900 and his mother was remarried in 1900 to William Hudson in Nottinghamshire.
He emigrated to Canada about 1909 and is found on the 1911 South Dorchester census in Belmont, a domestic servant, living with Llewellyn & Annie Ackert.
James was a cheesemaker living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on December 7, 1916 in London.  He had served one year in the 30th Battery.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Mary Hudson, 4 Holly Street, Doncaster, England.
A letter from Pte. Walters was printed in the Aylmer Express, August 2, 1917:
PTE. J. WALTERS IS ON HOSPITAL SHIP
He Says: “If you could see the hospital ships unload their wounded travellers you would see the effects of the World’s Greatest Struggle”
Mr and Mrs Richard Whyte, of Aylmer, have received the following interesting letter from Pte. J. Walters, who is attached to the Canadian Army Medical Corps, and has made two round trips from England to Halifax on a hospital ship, the H.M.H. S. Letitia. Pte. Walters made his home for some years with Mr and Mrs Whyte, but for the past three years previous to enlisting he helped make cheese at the Seville factory.
H.M.H.S. Letitia, London, Eng., 7.12.17
Dear Mr and Mrs Whyte:
I did try to pen a line or two while on the ocean. It seemed kind of dry stuff when I had written from Halifax and there seemed little more to tell you just then, but I”ll send it anyway. Can I ever thank you enough for your true kindness in writing and thinking of me so often, and George, I am glad you have been so kind to write to him too, for he must be lonesome. He has no relations to bother about him.  I haven’t heard from him yet nor do I know where he or my other chum is in France. I got a letter from him and he is parted from all the other fellows he knew. He said he wished he was with me ro I was over there, as he could not make up with anyone like he did with me. It is a pity we have to be drifted apart so. If the war continues, perhaps I’ll eventually get there yet. But I must write of your letters. How could I do without them? Three from you were handed to me the same afternoon, after arriving in England in the early morning. I did not sleep much through the night. I was in one of the wards, and with the clatter on deck and being stopped s often, it was almost impossible to sleep. I almost wished I had stayed in my cabin. And yet another letter from you and the box you speak of. I will tell of that later. I have to go on parade in a few minutes, even though on board ship we are not free from that.
Whilst on parade, another letter from you appeared, also one from siss. And Mrs. Whyte, don’t ever think your kind, friendly letters would tire me. I am so glad to get them and to know you are well. When letters come in on all sides from you, after a tiring voyage at sea I’m overwhelmed with gladness. How could I be otherwise? and Mr. Whyte’s letters, with all their news, are more than welcome. Sometimes I wonder am I worthy of all your kindness, so often sent out from you in your little home in Aylmer. I had wondered how you would take it when you got that night telegram, but I had no idea you would think me on the way home, and can well imagine your disappointment when my letter arrived to explain. Of course you would naturally think there was something wrong when you did not have the least idea of me being in Canada. I think I must have all your kind letters so far. I got five today, July 12th. I was glad to get one from Siss. It is likely she was surprised to think you wrote so often.
There is always something new to tell if it is only about every day life. Of course it is easier for me, travelling around so much and always something new. If I was in France I am afraid I would be deprived of writing so much. My chum said he could not tell all he would like to. He is with a field ambulance now, so it is likely they are quite near the lines. I hope he won’t get like some of the fellows I have seen, that return on the hospital ship. I wonder if you see anything about them in the papers you take. I often picture Mr. Whyte reading the news to you like he did when I have been with you. It will be quite a change if you are left all alone now. Don’t you remember the winter I stayed with you, just us three, what a nice time we had. It is easy now to reflect back to such by-gone days and wonder if they will ever come again. We can but hope sincerely that they will.
The box you helped to pack was a great surprise to me and a gift that words can hardly express to you and the Ladies’ Institute, who surely do so much for the lonely boys. Some giving their life’s blood. It is indeed a great sacrifice. They could do no more. God is just, and surely Heaven will reward them. “For greater love hath no man than that he lay down his life for his friend”. There seemed so much in the box, that only careful hands could have packed. And then to know whose hands really packed them. I am afraid you must have gone to a lot of expense in the things you sent, and the socks. I was really in need of them. They are made to fit so well. Some we get are inches too long for the feet, and the towels are so nice and soft. Believe me, if I say I am pleased with everything, and I do thank you so much. I am sure George will be too.
That box of chocolates. I don’t know what to think about them. They are indeed a mystery I fear never to be solved. I never got them. If you got a card saying I did, I feel sure in saying it was not from me. I think they must have gone to France. I do hope these two letters will find their way to you before we reach Canadian shores again. I expect we will return before long. I think there are a few repairs to be made before we leave. I’ll write again in a few days.
I am glad you spoke of Paddy. I wondered how he was. He is such a nice little thing. I expect the Canadian roads are well filed with cards this summer, as more keep getting them every year.
I know you folks will never fail me, but I am afraid it will be a task to undertake writing every week.
Good night, my dearest friends. Forgive me if I’ve written too much. Believe me always the same affectionate boy, Pte. J. Walters
Another letter from Lance Corporal J. Walters was printed in the Aylmer Express, August 16, 1917. On page one of the same issue, the following caption appears under his photograph:
Lance Corporal J. Walters, a former Aylmer man, who is a member of the C.A.M.C. He is on duty on a hospital ship sailing across the Atlantic, and in a letter in this issue gives a graphic account of the loss of the boat on the return trip to Canada recently. All the patients aboard were saved after the big ship struck a rock. Before enlisting Lance Corporal Walters was cheese maker at Seville, and for some years made his home with Mr and Mrs Richard White of this place.
The letter is as follows:
HOSPITAL SHIP WAS WRECKED: AYLMER MAN ON BOARD
L/C. J. Walters, a former Aylmer Man, who has made several voyages across the Atlantic
as a nurse on a Hospital ship, tells of the wreck of boat on a return voyage to Canada
All were saved
To the Aylmer Express.
Dear Mr. Editor –
No doubt you have heard of shipwrecked sailors, but a shipwrecked soldier sounds almost ridiculous. Of course, in wartime, you need hardly be surprised to hear of anything. Being of the latter I will try and pen a line or so of our last voyage on a hospital ship which now lies a wreck off the Nova Scotian coast almost submerged beneath the waves. Over in Blighty, many of our Canadian boys who have done their bit on the battlefields of France and have sacrificed much, await their turn to be sent back to their Canadian homes in the hospital ship, they that needed mostly special care.
The ship spoken of could only be pictured by the onlooker on shore, clean and shiny, coming down the river and along the landing stage to take on wounded passengers for the outgoing voyage, who came in on hospital trains to the water front; some on stretchers with their own stretcher bearers and escort. Once on board, they were in our care and for the first time I saw the moving picture man winding in the scenes on his film, the bright sunshine in his favor. First came the mental cases, then men who could walk by the aid of sticks and crutches, heads and limbs swathed in bandages; last of all stretcher cases and baggage. All on board, the gang-way lifted, the boat loosed her moorings, the gaping stream of water widened between us and shore. The engines ceased, the anchor dropped and we were out in the stream forty-eight hours swinging with the tide. At last the boys sent up a cheer in the evening. The sun sinking low in the west, we headed out to sea. The following morning enveloped us in fog and travelling was slow, finally stopped altogether, well in the danger zone, a British destroyer visible through the maze on our port side. In a few hours the fog lifted a little and we continued on. After days of cold, rough weather and fog of which the Newfoundland coast seems never free, to my idea, the voyage had an unpleasant ending. The first day of August, land had been seen in the early morning, after 10 a.m. when I was on deck, one of our men said we had passed a boat and that the pilate had been taken on. I went down below to my duty. A few minutes after by the tremble of the boat and sudden reversed engines I knew we had struck something. The bed patients were a little nervous. When the boys saw the rocks they thought it a funny place to land and striking Canada with a vengeance. P. V. Boats quickly answered the call for help and at once began taking off the patients. By that time No. 1 hold was fast taking water, reaching the Red Cross stores and provisions. We stayed on board and worked knee deep in water carrying some of the stores out. Then the boat came for us. She had by that time listed heavily to starboard. The last I saw was two powerful government tugs pulling astern and the boat frantically churning with her own propeller. I had hoped to see her move back, but to us she was soon lost through the fog.
Of course we will go back overseas, the war is not over yet and duty calls one of the boys from old Aylmer.
Yours truly, Lance Corporal J. Walters.
During our voyage back to England, we took over 90 nursing sisters.
Following the war, James returned to Malahide where he was a farmer in the Mount Salem area.  He was not married, and died on November 6, 1934 at the age of 45.  He is buried in Aylmer cemetery, marked by a simple footstone bearing only the inscription: “J. Walters”
His obituary, accompanied by a photograph, appeared in the Aylmer Express, November 22, 1934:
BODY OF JAMES WALTERS IS FOUND
Former Mt. Salem Man Found Drowned in Pinafore Lake, St. Thomas
Funeral in Aylmer on Friday
The body of James Walters, 47, war veteran, who has been missing for two weeks, was discovered Wednesday morning by police when the dragged the small lake in Pinafore Park, St. Thomas. His disappearance was a mystery until Tuesday afternoon late when a St. Thomas resident reported having found a coat and windbreaker on the roadway where Elm street crosses Pinafore Lake, two weeks ago. The clothing was identified by Adjutant Barr, of the Salvation Army, St. Thomas, to whom the unfortunate man had gone for spiritual counsel, declaring he wanted to end his life. Wednesday morning police had the lake near the road dragged, and the body was discovered in the middle of the lake, forty feet from shore. It was through Adjutant Barr that Walters secured a boarding house in St. Thomas, but he only spent one night there and disappeared the next morning. He left his car, a watch, and some valuable papers at his boarding house, and is said to have had a bank account in Aylmer.
Mr. Walters had worked for Edgar Shepherd, Mt. Salem farmer for eight years. Mrs. W. Hudson, of 4 Holly St., Doncaster, Yorkshire, Eng., is his only known relative.
He was born in England and came to Canada when but a boy. For many years he lived with the late D. O. White in Aylmer, until the latter’s death. In December 1917 at the age of 26, he enlisted with the Army Medical Corps and served on a hospital ship and in France, being discharged on March 31st, 1919. He spent some time in Westminster Hospital, London, suffering from neurasthenia and hyperthy roidism, and was in a highly nervous state.
Walters belonged to Aylmer Post Canadian Legion, which organization took charge of the remains yesterday, and had them removed to Allen & Son’s Funeral Home, Aylmer, where the funeral service will be held on Friday at 4 p.m. The service will be conducted by Rev. H. F. Kennedy, of Luton, and Rev. J. N. Kelly, chaplain of the Legion. Interment will be made in the Soldiers’ Plot in Aylmer cemetery.

Milson Ross Wardle

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Milson Wardle was born on March 24, 1896 at Springford in South Norwich Township, Oxford County, the son of John Wardle (1868-1949) & Ella Hilliker (1874-1954).  John was born in South Norwich, the son of Edward Wardle & Emeline Woodward, and was a machinist living in South Norwich when he was married on November 29, 1893 at Delhi to Ella Hilliker, also of South Norwich, the daughter of Harvey James & Amelia Hilliker.  John later was a cheesemaker and lived at R.R. #2 Aylmer, operating the Dunboyne Cheese factory. He and Ella are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Milson was also working as a butter and cheesemaker with his father at R.R. #2 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 14, 1918 in London.
He was living in Burford Township, Brant County working as a truck driver when he was married there on January 1, 1924 to Alberta Maud Creighton, also of Burford, the daughter of William & Harriet Alberta Creighton.
Milson & Alberta moved to Detroit about 1925 where he was a bus driver.  They are found there on the 1930 census with one son, Milson, about 1926.
They returned to Canada where he died on July 21, 1972 in Brantford. His obituary appeared in the Brantford Expositor, July 22, 1976:
WARDLE;  M. Ross – At the Brantford General Hospital, Friday, July 21, 1972, M. Ross Wardle of 96 Clarence Street (life member of Malahide Lodge #140, A.F. and A.M., Aylmer; member of Zion United Church); beloved husband of Alberta Creighton; dear father of Milson Ross Jr., of Kingston; also survived by grandchildren Brenda, Heather and Ian. Private service was held at McCleister Funeral Home Ltd, 30 Brant Avenue, followed by cremation. Rev. Waldemar Williams of Zion United Church officiated.

George Watson  George Watson

George Watson was born on June 13, 1897 in Scotland, the son of Henry Watson & Ruth Still.  He served with the Gordon Highlands Regiment in France during the war, and emigrated to Canada in 1926, living in Aylmer from 1938 to 1975.  He moved to Richmond, British Columbia, where he died on July 23, 1981. He was buried in Aylmer cemetery with his first wife Isabella Clark (1898-1956). His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, July 29, 1981:
GEORGE WATSON
George Watson, 84, of Richmond, British Columbia, and former custodian at the town hall, died in Richmond, Thursday, July 23.  While living in Aylmer from 1938 to 1975, Mr. Watson also served a term as president of Col. Talbot Branch 81 Royal Canadian Legion.
He was born in Scotland, June 13, 1897 and was the son of the late Henry and Ruth (Still) Watson. He came to Canada in 1926. Mr. Watson was a veteran of the First Great War, where he served with the Gordon Highlands Regiment, 51 Division, in France.
Mr. Watson is survived by a son, W. Alex Watson, St. Thomas; daughters: Mrs. James (Georgina) McArthur, London; Mrs. Jack (Barbara) Cooke, Calgary; and Mrs. Wayne (Sandra) VanVelzer, Sparta, and grandchildren Brian Watson and Mrs. John (Carol) Potticary both of St. Thomas, and Stephen Welch of Calgary; great-grandfather to Jodi, Jennifer and Amy Watson and Craig Potticary of St. Thomas.
He was predeceased by wives Isabella Clark (1956) and Elsie Baughner in 1973.  A funeral service was conducted from H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Tuesday, July 28, by Rev. Fred Ward of Aylmer. Burial was in Aylmer Cemetery. Pallbearers, all members of the legion were: Jack Harvey, Don Black, Norman Honsinger, Mike Rokeby, Jack Tripp and George Gavey.  Floral bearers were Reg Wellwood, Charles Jackson and Denby Breen.  Legion color party members were Gardner McKenna, Ron Lawson and John Vermey.

Herbert Watson

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Herbert Watson was born on December 21, 1887 in Walsall, Staffordshire, England, the son of William Watson & Elizabeth Harvey. He emigrated to Canada and was a farmer near St. Thomas.  He enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on December 18, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He gives his address as “Hillcrest Farm”, St. Thomas, and his next of kin as his mother, Elizabeth Watson, of 102 Tantarra Street, Walsall, Staffordshire, England.
Herbert was living in St. Thomas when he was married there on February 5, 1919 to Adeline Beulah Coombs, also of St. Thomas, the daughter of John Henry Coombs & Lucy Martin.  Herbert’s occupation is given as “soldier” on the marriage record.
Herbert celebrated his 100th birthday in 1887.  A photo appeared in the December 30, 1987 edition of the Aylmer Express, with the following caption:
“Herbert Watson, a resident of the Aylmer Nursing Home, recently celebrated his 100th birthday. Mr. Watson was born in Walsall, England on December 21, 1887, and moved to Canada when he was 23. He served in the Canadian army in the First Great War, and was a shoe repairman in St. Thomas. He retired in 1948, and has lived at the Aylmer Nursing Home for the last five years.”

Orval Ervin Watts

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Orval Watts was born on May 3, 1896 in Bayham, the son of Kirkland Riley Watts (1865-1933) & Mary Catherine Kerr (1870-1955).  Kirkland was the son of Isaac Watts & Rozena Robins, and was living in Bayham when he was married on November 11, 1891 in Vienna to “Kitty” Kerr, of Bayham, the daughter of Noble Kerr & Susan Byloe. They are buried in Tillsonburg cemetery.
Orval was a farmer living at RR #4 Tillsonburg when he enlisted for service on January 4, 1916 in Courtland.  He belonged to the 39th Regiment.
He was farming in Middleton Township, Norfolk County when he was married on May 5, 1920 in Tillsonburg to Agnes Helen Watson (1897-1964), of Middleton, the daughter of Joseph Watson & Jane Pringle. Orval died on December 3, 1956 in Woodstock, and is buried in Tillsonburg cemetery with his wife. His obituary appeared in the Tillsonburg News, December 6, 1956:
ORVAL E. WATTS
WOODSTOCK – Orval E. Watts, 60, who died suddenly at his home, 156 Finkle Street, Monday, spent his early life in Tillsonburg district, farming for some time and later working in milk plants.  Since coming here 16 years ago, he had been employed at the Royal Hotel and Royal Theatre. In World War I,  he served with the 133rd Norfolk Battalion, and in World War II, with the C.D. and M.S. School here, and later with the Veterans’ Guard.
Surviving besides his wife, the former Agnes Watson, are one son, Robert, Woodstock; two daughters, Mrs. A. Ellison and Mrs. J. Kovak, Toronto; three brothers, Kenneth, Tillsonburg; Henry, Brownsville; Leo, Ostrander; and three sisters, Mrs. F. Humphrey, Windsor; Mrs. J. B. McWain, Detroit; and Mrs. C. Mahoney, North Bayham.
Rested at the Rowell Funeral Home here, where service was conducted Wednesday by the Rev. C. Perkins. Interment in Tillsonburg cemetery.

Harry Berton Webber

3140203
Harry Webber was born on October 23, 1896 in Straffordville, the son of Tillman Webber (1863-1943) & Florence A. Travis (1869-1908).  Tillman was the son of Philetus Webber & Emaline S. Smith, and was farming in Bayham when he was married on August 31, 1891 in Aylmer to Florence (Flora) Travis, of Bayham, the daughter of Robert & Annie Travis.  Florence is buried in Claus cemetery, Bayham.  Tillman moved to Fenton, Michigan, but is returned to Ontario, living in Ingersoll where he died.  He is buried in Harris Street Cemetery, Ingersoll.
Harry Webber was a salesman living in Fenton, Michigan when he enlisted for service on October 23, 1918 in London.
He died in March 1984 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Harry Stewart Wells

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Harry Wells was born on May 2, 1897 in Port Burwell, the son of Charles Melbourn Wells & Dorothy Jane Helkaa.  Charles was born in Tillsonburg, the son of Chancy & Mariah Wells, and was farming in Houghton township when he was married on January 8, 1890 in Clear Creek to Dorothy Helkaa, a native of Walpole Township, Haldimand County, living in Houghton, the daughter of Lewis & Charlotte Helkaa.  Charles & Dorothy later moved to St. Thomas where they were living at 14 Jessie Street in 1918.
Harry was a baker living at 47 North Street, Galt, when he enlisted for service on January 3, 1918 in London. He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 17.
He was a baker living in Brantford when he was married on September 11, 1920 in Preston to Rachel Marsden, of Preston, the daughter of Aaron Marsden & Emma Welch.
Harry died on April 4, 1981 and is buried with his wife in New Hope cemetery, Cambridge.

Willard Earl West

84246
Willard West was born on August 14, 1896 in Springfield, the son of Peter West & Sarah Annetta Pugh.  Peter was born in Houghton Township, the son of Richard & Eliza West, and was a farmer in Dereham when he was married on June 2, 1886 in Tillsonburg to Nettie Pugh, a native of Wainfleet Township living in Dereham, the daughter of William & Melissa Jane Pugh.
Willard was a farmer and single when he enlisted for service on July 20, 1915 in Guelph.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Mrs. John P. Ball, of New Sarum.
When his sister, Mrs. John P. Ball died in 1942, her obituary states she is survived by a brother Wilfred West of Brantford. No further information is known.

Charles Westlake

The name “Charles Westlake” is found on a Springfield Honor Roll. The only attestation paper found for a man by this name was Charles Michael Westlake, #2611951.  He enlisted for service on May 29, 1918 in London.  His address was R.R. #4 Essex, Ontario. He names his next of kin as his mother, Clara, at the same address. He was a farmer, and not married.  He was born on December 13, 1898 in Colchester Township North, Essex County, the son of William Westlake & Clara Landgraff.  The family is found on both the 1901 and 1911 census in Colchester North.
Following the war, Pte. Charles Michael Westlake, of the 16th Field Ambulance, arrived home at Victoria, B.C., on May 5, 1919, having sailed from Vladivostok, Russia. He returned to Colchester Township, where he was living when he was married on April 15, 1920 in Essex to Minnie Garrow, of Essex, the daughter of John Garrow & Bertha Dennis.
No connection can be found to the Springfield area.  It is possible he was working in the area between the 1911 census and 1918 when he enlisted.
Charles died in Essex in January, 1963.  Two obituaries appeared in the Windsor Star, January 7, 1963:
WESTLAKE – Charles Michael, 64 years, suddenly at home, 25 Maple Row, Essex. Beloved husband of Minnie Garrow. Dear father of Jack, Robert, and Mrs. Arnold Newart (Phyllis) of Essex. Brother of Harold, Essex; Mrs. Cecil Slickenmyer, Roseville, Mich.; Mrs. Carl Hitchcock, of Highland Park, Mich. Resting at the Stewart L. Kennedy Funeral Home, 128 Talbot St. N., Essex, for services Wed. Jan. 9, 1963 at 2 p.m. Rev. D.  H. Rudd officiating. Interment Victoria Memorial Cemetery.
WESTLAKE – Charles M., 64; 25 Maple Row, Essex, at home. Lifelong resident of Essex district. Member of Essex Gospel Tabernacle. Survivors: widow, Minnie (nee Garrow); sons, Jack and Robert, of Essex; daughter, Mrs. Arnold Neuert (Phyllis), of Essex; brother, Harold, of Essex; sisters, Mrs. Cecil Slickenmyer of Roseville, Mich., and Mrs. Carl Hitchcock, of Highland Park, Mich.; nine grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. Funeral Wednesday 2 p.m. Stewart L. Kennedy Funeral Home, 128 Talbot St., Essex. Rev. D. H. Rudd.

Frederick Westover

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Frederick Westover was born on September 6, 1899 in Aylmer, the son of Alberta M. Westover.  Alberta was the daughter of Lewis Westover & Eliza Powers, and was later married to Llewellyn Bridgeman of Malahide on December 25, 1901.
Frederick was a baker living at 225 Centre Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on May 25, 1917 in St. Thomas. He names his next of kin as his mother, Bertha Bridgeman, of 33 Gass Street, St. Thomas.
Frederick died on June 8, 1926 and is buried in St. Thomas West Avenue cemetery. There is no marker.  An article about his death appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, June 14, 1926:
KILLED IN MISTAKE FOR ANOTHER
FRED WESTOVER’S BODY IS HERE
Former London, Ontario Man, With Many Relatives in St. Thomas,
Attacked By Man When He Parked His Car in Spot Where Assailant Expected to Meet Another
To meet death at the hands of a gunman in mistake for another was the sad fate which befell Fred Westover, aged 26, a former resident of London, Ont., and a Canadian war veteran, at Louisville, Kentucky, last Tuesday.
Westover left London two weeks ago on a motor trip to Virginia. He spent a few days in Chatham with his brother Arthur Bridgeman, and also visited with his sister, Mrs. Ray Johnston in Detroit before proceeding on his journey.  He arrived at Louisville a week ago and took a temporary position with the Arctic Ice Company as a stationary engineer.
Last Tuesday he left his rooming house to call for the son of his landlady at the place where he is employed and while seated in front of the building in his Ford coupe, a man dashed up to him, pushed a gun in his face and fired.  One bullet penetrated Mr. Westover’s brain, another struck him in the throat and the third in the left hand.  He died Tuesday evening at 8:20 o’clock.
The gunman, Richard Karr, aged 28, an employee of the Louisville and Interurban Railroad Company, immediately surrendered to the police.  He said that a strange man had been following his wife Donnie, aged 20, for several days.  She had repulsed the man, who was persistent. The stranger had insisted that he would meet her on Tuesday afternoon at the same spot where Mr. Westover unfortunately parked his car. The husband had followed his wife down the street and he alleged that an insulting remark was hurled at his wife from Mr. Westover’s car.  People standing by stated Mr. Westover had not spoken. The tragedy is undeniably a case of mistaken identity according to police and eye witnesses. Mr. Westover was an absolute stranger in Louisville, his acquaintances being just employees of the Arctic Ice Company, roomers at his boarding house and his landlady, Mrs. B. H. Graves, who spoke in the highest terms of the youth.
The deceased leaves to mourn his untimely death, his mother, Mrs. Alberta Bridgeman, of Detroit; six sisters, Mrs. Ray Johnston, Mrs. James Senese, Detroit; Misses Helen, Winnifred, Ruby Bridgeman, 9 ½ Medina street, St. Thomas; two brothers, Burton Bridgeman, St. Thomas; Arthur Bridgeman, Chatham; two aunts, Mrs. Robert Lowe, 345 Talbot Street, St. Thomas; Mrs. Charles Wood, of London, Ontario, and an uncle, Lewis Westover, London.
When news of the tragedy was received in Detroit by the deceased’s sister, Mrs. Ray Johnston, her husband left immediately for Louisville. The body was brought to St. Thomas on Saturday by Mr. Johnston and taken to C. A. Towers’ funeral parlors.  The funeral took place this afternoon with interment in St. Thomas cemetery.
Murderer convicted
Apparently not a mistaken identity afterall.
Karr aquitted

Slayer of Masher

George Frederick Westover

189922
George Frederick Westover’s name is found in the Book of Remembrance.  His attestation paper is unavailable for viewing, but the above record indicates he enlisted in January 1916 with the 91st Battalion in St. Thomas, and was discharged in June 1916.
George Frederick Westover was born on December 13, 1874 in Bayham, the son of William F. Westover, a mariner, and Rosa Richards.  He is found on the 1901 Bayham census with a wife Annabel (born 1877). No further information is known.

Arthur James Wharton

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The name Alfred Wharton is found in a list of men from Jaffa serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, December 14, 1916.  The article states that Alfred is a “son-in-law of Mr. Doolittle,  is a British reservist, and a veteran of five campaigns.  He was severely wounded while fighting on the Somme and at present is in an English hospital”.  It was in fact his wife who had connections to Jaffa, while Arthur had ties to Springfield. He is found on the 1901 census in Springfield with his parents.
However, research has discovered that this man’s name was actually Arthur, not Alfred.  He was born on February 9, 1873 at Decewsville in North Cayuga township, Haldimand County, the son of Thomas Wharton & Mary Ellen Flannigan.  Thomas & Mary Ellen later lived in Springfield, where they are found on the 1901 & 1911 census.  Thomas was born in 1835 in Quebec, and died in Springfield on June 12, 1914.  His wife Mary was born September 9, 1838 in Ontario. Thomas is buried in Springfield cemetery, but there is no marker.  Arthur’s brother Pte. Thomas Wharton was killed in action on September 26, 1916. In the announcement of  Thomas’ death in the St. Thomas Daily Times, January 31, 1917, mention is made of Arthur:
SPRINGFIELD MAN IS KILLED IN ACTION
Springfield, Jan. 31 – Mrs. Geo. Stewart received a long letter yesterday from A. J. Wharton, who is now at a convalescent home in St. Leonards on Sea, England.  Arthur was with the Strathcona Horse during the South African War.  As soon as the call came for men he enlisted and spent a year or so in the front line trenches before receiving injury.  His brother, Thomas, who went West some years ago, and whom his family supposed dead, was killed not far from where Arthur was wounded.  Arthur, however, was unaware that his brother was in the battle until he learned the news after reaching England.
Arthur Wharton was a carpenter employed with the J. F. Gallivan Building Co. living in Welland, Ontario when he was married on July 21, 1906 in Humberstone, Welland, to Lulu May Doolittle, a native of Nebraska, living in Luton, the daughter of Wilber Doolittle & Clara Fushia. Arthur & Lulu moved to Welland, where they are found on the 1911 census with two children, Thomas (born 1908) and Clara (born 1911).
They later moved to Windsor where Arthur was living at 75 Crawford Ave. when he enlisted for service on November 30, 1914 in Toronto.  He was employed as a millwright, and had served three years in the Royal Navy, and six years in R.M.A.
Arthur also served in the South African (Boer) War.  In an article in the Aylmer Express regarding the dedication of the Springfield War memorial in 1931, it states: “The Springfield Veterans’ wreath was placed by J. A. Wharton, who was welcomed home from South Africa thirty years ago”.
Following the war, Arthur & Lulu were living in Amherstburg, where a daughter Constance was born in 1920.
An article about Arthur appeared in the London Free Press, December 31, 1938, accompanied by his photograph:
A. J. WHARTON, BRYON, TO GET BOER WAR MEDAL LOST 33 YEARS AGO
Former Middlesex High Constable To Receive From British Columbia
Prized Award Given Him by King Edward VII and Dropped on Calgary Street
Assumed Name of Trelevan, After Being Invalided From West Africa to Enlist for Great War
CALGARY, Dec. 30 – A. J. Wharton, of Byron, Ont., former high constable of Middlesex County, veteran of three wars, will soon have a prized South African Boer War medal that he lost on a Calgary street nearly 33 years ago.  The medal, pinned on Wharton’s chest by King Edward VII, has rested in a British Columbia home for nearly 33 years.
At the time Wharton received the award in 1902, he was known as Sergt. J. Trelevan, of the Lord Strathcona Horse.  He had previously been discharged as an invalid after fighting in a South African Zulu battle.  In 1914 he enlisted and fought in the Great War.
A Calgary newspaper ran a story of the lost medal last Armistice Day when the British Columbia resident sought the owner. W. H. Atkin, insurance man, of Edmonton, then recalled Wharton’s visit to Calgary in 1906 and also the soldier’s career.
Mr. Atkin exchanged letters with his friend; finding that when the medal was awarded Wharton was known as Trelevan. Mr. Wharton replied:
“Prior to the South African Boer War, I was discharged, invalided, from the Royal Marine Artillery after an expedition on the Gold Coast, West Africa. For fear this would stop me from going with Col Sam Steele, I joined under the name of Trelevan.  I joined the Lord Strathcona Horse at Moosomin, Sask. Lieut Christie, of Moosomin, was our troop officer”.
Mr. Wharton also told of how King Edward had given him the medal at Buckingham Palace when the regiment returned to London, Eng.
Wharton said he was high constable for Middlesex County, Ont., for 13 years until four years ago when the Ontario police force was taken over by the province.
“As I remember the story, young Wharton ran away and stowed on a boat going over to the old country”, Mr. Atkin said. “He fought in the Zulu War and suffered lung wounds”.

Henry Robert Whisken

400892  Henry Whiskin
Henry Robert Whisken was born on June 14, 1897 in Dunbarton, Scotland.  It is not known when he emigrated to Canada and how long he may have lived in the Springfield area.  He does not appear in the area on the 1911 census.
Robert enlisted for service on May 5, 1915 in London with the 33rd Battalion.  He was a labourer and was not married.  He names his next of kin as his brother George Whisken, of Springfield, Ont.  He enlisted with the 33rd Battalion. Another service number, 1429, has been crossed out.
A postcard with a photograph of H. R. Whisken was found in the collection of Evelyn Hoshal, which was donated to the Aylmer Museum.  It was published in the Aylmer Express, October 22, 2008.  The caption reads: “This is a photo postcard circa 1914-18 addressed to W. J. Kilpatrick of Springfield from H. R. Whisken, 1429 D. Coy. 33rd Regiment, London East.  The message states: ‘coming down soon, suppose you remember my face, am in my Bugle Band uniform. Army is a great life. Getting ready to camp out. Yours truly”.
Following the war, Pte. Whisken returned to Canada on May 22, 1919, landing in Halifax.  No further information can be found.

Harold John Whetstone

The name Harold Whetstone is found in a list of members of Trinity Anglican Church serving overseas, printed in the Aylmer Express, October 7, 1916.
Harold Whetstone was born on June 26, 1884 Haddenham, Cambridgeshire, England, the son of Robert & Harriet Whetstone. The family is found on the 1901 census in Haddenham.  He was married in 1910 to Elizabeth Dewsberry (1887-1952) in England.  With their young daughter, Ada Irene, the left Southampton on the ship Ascania and arrived in Portland, Maine on April 26, 1912.  The passenger list states Harold was a farmer and their destination was Lyons, Ontario.
No attestation paper can be found for Harold.  It is possible he returned to England to enlist.  There is a Harold J. Whetstone, service number 318, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (England), who received a Victory medal in 1914.
Passenger lists indicate that Harold returned to Canada on August 29, 1918 via New York.  He was a soldier and his destination was Lyons.  Another passenger list shows a Harold J. Whetstone arriving in St. John’s, Newfoundland on April 11, 1919.  He had been in Canada in 1912, for three years at Lyons. His destination was Springfield.  From these records, it is possible that Harold was sent home, perhaps injured, in 1918, but returned to England before the end of the war.
Harold died in Aylmer on August 12, 1960 and is buried with his wife in Aylmer cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 18, 1960:
H. John Whetstone
H. John Whetstone, 36 Chestnut street, died at his home suddenly Friday morning following a heart attack. He was 76.  Mr. Whetstone was born at Haddenham, England, on June 26, 1884, and was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Robert Whetstone. A retired farmer, he came to Canada 48 years ago and resided in the Aylmer district since that time.  A World War I veteran, he was a member of Trinity Anglican Church.  Mr. Whetstone’s wife, Elizabeth, died in 1952.
He is survived by one son, Robert, R.R. 1 Aylmer; three daughters, Mrs. George (Irene) Bone and Mrs. Watkin (Lena) Livingstone, both of Aylmer; Mrs. George (Kathleen) Prouse, Brantford; one brother, Albert in England, and two sisters, Mrs. Nellie Duffield and Miss Edith Whetstone, both of England. Also surviving are grandchildren Bonnie, Mary and Jane Whetstone; Fred and Robert Bone, and Larry, Brenda and Donald Prouse, and a number of nieces and nephews.
Service was conducted Monday afternoon August 15 at the Hughson Funeral Home by Rev. Ronald Mathewman of Trinity Anglican Church.  Mrs. James Wright presided at the organ. Interment was in the family plot in Aylmer cemetery.  Pallbearers were George Carter, Percy Jibson, Frank Burdge, Murray Owen, William Hodgkiss and Leon Carter. The beautiful floral tributes were carried by Bill Lang, John Polchin, Huron Sears and Charles Lorch.  Friends and relatives attended from Montreal, Tillsonburg, Brantford, Aylmer and district.

Robert James Whitcroft

823818  Robert Whitcroft
Robert Whitcroft was born on February 25, 1869 in North Dorchester Township, Middlesex County, the son of Jacob Whitcroft (1845-1919) and Margaret Ann Newell (1852-1900). Jacob was a resident of Malahide before moving to a farm near Crampton.  Margaret Newell was a descendant of the Newell family of the 9th concession of Malahide.  They are buried in Delmer Cemetery.
Robert was first married on August 15, 1892 in Springfield to Sarah Jamieson (1873-1892), and following her death he was remarried on December 23, 1894 to Eriminta Mary Lyons Mitts (1879-1960) in Tillsonburg.
Robert was a blacksmith and was living  in Aylmer in 1901. He later lived on lot 23 & lot 24, concession 1, Malahide, near Grovesend  for about eight years.  They then moved to Thamesville in Kent County where he was living when he enlisted for service on April 30, 1916 in London.
Following the war, he lived in London and retired in Brownsville where he died on May 8, 1927.  He is buried in Woodland Cemetery, London.

Wallace Glen Roy Whitcroft

190294  Wallace Whitcroft
Wallace Whitcroft was born on November 6, 1896 in Brownsville, Dereham Township, Oxford County, the son of George Thomas Whitcroft (1872-1906) & Ida May Acre (1879-1942).  George was born in North Dorchester Township, Middlesex County, the son of Jacob Whitcroft & Margaret Ann Newell, and was married on January 13, 1897 in Courtland to Ida Acre, a native of Bayham township, and daughter of Nicholas Acre & Laura Matthews. She was remarried to Herbert Blashill in 1909 in Aylmer.
Wallace was a farmer living in the Aylmer area when he enlisted for service with the 91st Battalion on April 24, 1916 in St. Thomas.  He had served in the 30th Battery, C.F.A.
Wallace returned from overseas on October 11, 1919, departing from Mistley, England, and arriving in Halifax.
Following the war, Wallace was married on January 29, 1920 to Hannah (Hazel) Elizabeth Taylor Smith (1895-1985).  Hannah was the daughter of William Taylor, and widow of Ernest Smith of Houghton Township, who was killed in action in the Great War.
Wallace also served during World War II, and died on September 23, 1977 at Westminster Hospital, London. He is buried in South Park Cemetery, St. Thomas.
Wallace’s obituary from an undated clipping:
WALLACE WHITCROFT
Wallace Whitcroft of Westminster Hospital, London, and formerly of St. Thomas, passed away after ailing health in his 80th year.
Born in Brownsville, the son of the late George and Ida Whitcroft, he moved to St. Thomas in 1943 and was a retired truck driver.
Mr. Whitcroft was an adherent of the Baptist Church and served overseas with the 91st Battalion in the First World War and also served overseas in the Second World War.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Hazel (Taylor) Whitcroft, of Woodstock; three sons, Glen of Windsor, Clifford of Chatham, and Gerald of St. Thomas; three step-sons Roy Smith of Florida, William Smith of Chatham, and Jack Smith of 75 Elm Street, St. Thomas; one step-daughter, Mrs. Rita (Smith) Whitcroft of Norwich; three sisters, Mrs. Stella Steinhoff of Ingersoll, Mrs. Eva McIntyre of Aylmer, and Mrs. Helen Laidlaw of Aylmer; and a number of grandchildren, great grandchildren, nieces and nephews.
Another son Hugh Whitcroft and two brothers Victor and Harry Whitcroft, died previously.
Resting at the Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, St. Thomas, from where the funeral service will be held Monday at 1:30 p.m. Padre J. L. Petrie of Branch 41 Royal Canadian Legion officiating.  Interment in South Park Cemetery.

Gordon Benjamin White

3138660  Gordon White
Gordon White was born on August 9, 1896  in Malahide, the son of John Adolphus White (1868-1953) & Elizabeth Houghton (1870-1955).  John was born at Jaffa, the son of Benjamin White & Christie Ann Powers, and was married on December 16, 1891 at Jaffa to Elizabeth Houghton, who was born in England, the daughter of John & Elizabeth Houghton.
Gordon was farming with his parents at R. R. #2 Aylmer near Copenhagen when he enlisted for service on June 14, 1918 in London.
He was married on September 4, 1918 in South Dorchester to Cilicia Catherine Warwick (1898-1982), of South Dorchester, daughter of James Warwick & Catherine Marshall.
Gordon died on March 18, 1969 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, March 19, 1969:
GORDON WHITE
A retired general farmer, Gordon White of Mapleton, died at his home on Tuesday morning. He was 72. Mr. White was well-known throughout the area. He had farmed at Mapleton for 50 years.  He was born at Dunboyne on August 9, 1896, a son of the late John White and the former Elizabeth Houghton.  He was an adherent of the Church of Christ Disciples, Mapleton.
Surviving are his wife, the former Cilicia Warwick; one son, Wilfred of New Sarum; one daughter, Mrs. Lloyd (Edna) Soper of St. Thomas; two brothers, Lorne of Aylmer and John A., of Mapleton; four sisters, Mrs. Lela Lee of St. Thomas; Mrs. Clayton (Mary) Wise of RR 4, St. Thomas; Mrs. William (Neva) Edmonds of RR 2, St. Thomas; Mrs. Lorne (Nora) Campbell of RR 8, St. Thomas; five grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
Resting at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer, for service at 2 p.m., Thursday. Burial in Aylmer Cemetery. The Rev. Lorne Nethercott of the Church of Christ, Mapleton, will officiate.
Herbert Spencer White
Herbert White was born on August 9, 1879 at Orwell, the son of Albert White (1837-1917) and Phoebe Ursula Davis (1845-1932).  Albert was born at Markham, Ontario, the son of Ira Davis, and was married in Norfolk County on May 24, 1860 to Phoebe Davis, a native of Bayham township, daughter of David Flint Davis & Mary Birdsell.  Albert & Phoebe are buried in Orwell cemetery.
Herbert White became a physician and was living in McBain, Michigan when he was married on December 29, 1909 in St. Thomas to Helen Leone McKenna (1885-1970), of St. Thomas, the daughter of James McKenna & Annie Middleton. Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 30, 1909:
The marriage took place at St. Thomas yesterday, at 3 p.m. of Leone, daughter of Mr and Mrs Jas. McKenna of 58 Gladstone Ave., and Dr. Herbert White, a son of Mr and Mrs Albert White of Springwater. Miss Bessie I. McKenna, sister of the bride acted as bridesmaid, while Dr. Brown of Detroit performed the duties of best man.  Messrs. Clare Douglas and Leslie Brinkman were the ushers. After a honeymoon trip to Detroit and other Western points, the young couple will reside in McBane, Mich., where the Dr. has an extensive practice.
They were living in Aylmer when Dr. White enlisted for service on August 10, 1916.  He was formerly a Lieutenant in the A.M.C. (American Medical Corps), and belonged to the C.A.M.C.  He enlisted as a Captain.
He died on April 10, 1957 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Dr. White’s obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, April 11, 1957:
DR. HERBERT S. WHITE, 78, FORMER AYLMER POSTAMSTER
Aylmer – A former postmaster here, Dr. Herbert S. White, 59 Pine street west, died late last night at his home following a heart attack.  Born at Springwater 78 years ago, he was the son of the late Albert White and Phoebe Davis.  Dr. White lived most of his life in Aylmer except for service spent as a medical officer during World War 1.  He was an adherent of St. Paul’s United Church and was postmaster in Aylmer from 1938 until his retirement in 1945. He is survived by his wife, the former Leona McKenna; two daughters, Mrs. D. L. (Phoebe) Braithwaite, of Toronto; and Mrs. James (Marion) Cameron, of Springford; and one son, James S. White, of Orlando, Fla.  Another son, Herbert A. White, is presumed to have died in a flying accident in Labrador in 1956. Two brothers, Fred and Gordon White of Springwater, also survive.  Resting at the James H. Barnum Funeral Home, Aylmer, from where service will be held on Saturday at two o’clock. Rev. J. N. Gould, of St. Paul’s United Church, will conduct the service and interment will be made in Aylmer cemetery.

Joseph White

The name Joseph White appears on a Springfield Honor Roll; but no one by that name can be found on the 1901 or 1911 census in the Springfield area. There are 64 attestation papers bearing the name Joseph White, and several are not available for viewing.

William George White

2009420
William White was born on April 17, 1885 in Vienna, the son of William Joseph White (1857-1942) & Elizabeth Deborah Brown (1858-1946).  William Joseph was born in Trafalgar Township, Halton County, the son of David & Caroline White, and was living in Vienna when he was married there on December 25, 1877 to Elizabeth Brown, of Vienna, the daughter of John & Hannah Brown.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
William was living in  Dodge City, Kansas where he was employed as a train dispatcher, when he enlisted for service on June 1, 1918 in Chicago.  He names his next of kin as his wife, Mrs. Imlah White of RR #4 Aylmer. He enlisted with the Canadian Engineers, C.E.F.
William G. & Lulah E. White are found on the 1930 census in Dearborn, Michigan, where he is a train dispatcher. The census indicates he emigrated to the United States in 1906.  Lulah was a native of Ohio.
When his mother died in 1946, William was living in Port Huron, Michigan.
William’s name appears on his parents’ monument in Aylmer cemetery, but a date of death has not been inscribed.  Also on the monument is his wife, Lulah E. (1875-1946).

William Gregory White

874065
William White was born on September 6, 1896 in Aylmer, the son of William Robert White & Ethel Elizabeth Gregory.  William R. White was a merchant and bookkeeper, living in Aylmer, the son of W. W. & Rosanna Jane White.  He was married in Aylmer on June 1, 1893 to Ethel Gregory, also of Aylmer, daughter of William & Elizabeth Gregory. There is a William & Elizabeth Gregory buried in Aylmer cemetery who may be Ethel’s parents: “William Gregory born in Lincoln Co., Oct. 26, 1818 died in Belmont, Feb. 17, 1874;  Elizabeth Anne Stuart Secord, his wife, born in Napanee, Jan. 24, 1827 died in Aylmer, Apr. 26, 1893″
The family later moved to Winnipeg. William was a bank clerk living with his parents at 300 Polson Ave., Winnipeg when he enlisted for service there on February 9, 1916.
No further information is known.

Gordon Everett Wickett

401681  Gordon Wickett
Gordon Wickett was born on June 12, 1895 at Orwell in Malahide, the son of George Bartlett Wickett (1870-1935) & Emma Matthews (1865-1937). George was born at Orwell, the son of George & Betsy Wickett and was farming there when he was married on December 28, 1892 in Vienna to Emma Matthews, of Vienna, daughter of Harvey J. & Catherine Matthews. They are buried in Orwell cemetery.
Gordon enlisted for service on September 3, 1915 in St. Thomas.  He lists his next of kin as Mrs. G. E. Wickett of 7 Charles Street, St. Thomas.  He had served two years in the 25th Regiment.
Following the war, Gordon returned to St. Thomas where he was employed as a trainman on the railway, and was married there on May 5, 1920 to Elsie M. Gould, a native of Cornwall living in St. Thomas, the daughter of William Gould & Emma Palmer.
Gordon died on December 9, 1930 at the Queen Alexandra Sanitarium in London from tuberculosis at the age of 35 years.  He was living at 18 Hemlock Street in St. Thomas and was a brakeman on the railway.  He is buried in St. Thomas Cemetery, West Avenue.
Gordon’s obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, December 10, 1930:
GORDON WICKETT DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Great War Veteran Passes at the Queen Alexandria Sanitarium on Tuesday
The death occurred at the Queen Alexandria Sanitarium on Tuesday afternoon, after months of illness, the after effects of service in the Great War, of Gordon Wickett, Charles street, in his thirty-sixth year.  Mr. Wickett, who was born in Orwell, the son of Mr and Mrs George Wickett, moved to St. Thomas in 1913 and was a brakeman on the Pere Marquette.  He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and was also a member of the United church.  Mr. Wickett also made his home in Sparta before moving to St. Thomas and had many friends throughout the district who will regret his untimely demise. Besides his parents, he is survived by his wife and two daughters, Helen, aged nine, and Jocelyn, aged six; also one sister, Miss Florence Wickett, at home. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon at four o’clock from the family residence, 1 Charles street, interment in the St. Thomas cemetery.
The details of his funeral were reported in the December 13, 1930 issue:
GORDON WICKETT
The funeral of Gordon Wickett, a highly esteemed resident of St. Thomas, who passed away on Tuesday at the Queen Alexandria Sanitarium, Byron, after a few months’ illness, took place on Thursday afternoon from the family residence, 1 Charles street, and was largely attended. Rev. M. M. Bennett, pastor of St. Andrew’s United Church, West Avenue, officiated at the services, during which Miss Nellie Dunlop sang a solo, “Does Jesus Care”. A large number of B. of R. T. members attended the funeral, and the service for the B. of R. T. was read at the graveside by J. H. Modeland, president, while R. Balkwill acted as chaplain.  The pallbearers were F. Ostranader, R. H. Kew, H. Barr, C. Karnes, K. J. Crandall, Bruce Padbury, while the floral bearers were E. Swift, F. Carrothers, C. Barr, F. Smith.  A special car was required to convey the floral tributes to the cemetery. Among them was a large pillow from the widow and family, “Daddy”; a spray from the father, mother and sister; spray from Elmdale school; spray from comrades of 91st Battalion; basket from neighbors; a wreath from Unity Lodge, No. 47; B. of R. T.; and many sprays and designs from relatives and friends. Among the relatives from a distance were Mr and Mrs George Wickett and Miss Florence Wickett, Orwell; Mr and Mrs H. B. Matthews and son, Mrs. L. P. Liddle, Brantford; Mrs. Thomas Gee, Chatham; Claude Gray, Windsor; Mr and Mrs V. Ball, Mrs. T. Savie, London; Mrs. William Battle, Gordon Battle, Sarnia, and many other.

Mervin Wickett

126290
According to his attestation paper, Mervin Wickett was born on September 20, 1899 in Aylmer.  A birth registration was found for a John Mason Wickett on September 20, 1900 in Aylmer, the son of John Wickett & Alice Finch.  John Henry Wickett was born in Sunshine, Morris Township, Huron County, the son of John Wickett & Sarah Addley, and was living in Aylmer when he was married on December 25, 1895 in St. Thomas to Alice Finch, also of Aylmer, but a native of Lobo, the daughter of Charles Finch & Elizabeth Hurren.  John & Alice and their family are found on the 1901 and 1911 census in Aylmer.
Mervin was employed as a miller jobber when he enlisted for service on September 10, 1915 in Ingersoll.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Alice, of Aylmer.
Mervin returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in Halifax on September 17. His return was reported in the Aylmer Express, September 27, 1917:
Pte. Mervin Wickett, eldest son of Mr and Mrs John Wickett, of this place, arrived home on Saturday noon last.  Pte. Wickett enlisted and went to England with the 71st Battalion more than a year ago. The authorities in England would not allow him to go to France, which was his destination, on account of his age.  He was but 17 years old last week, although in appearance he would easily pass for 21 or past.  Pte. Wickett says there is a food shortage in England in many lines, and there is certainly need for food conservation among the allies.  He had an uneventful trip home except that the sea was pretty rough. They saw no submarines, the reason no doubt being, because they had a convoy of a fleet of 8 ships all the way over.  Pte. Wickett is home on a few days furlough when he has to report to London, Ont., for further orders, and expects to be detailed for military duties in Canada.
He was a Dominion Constable living in St. Thomas when he was married on September 17, 1918 in London to Myrtle May White, of London, the daughter of Thomas White & Sarah Lally.
No further information can be found.

Arthur Frederick Gordon Wickham

123544
The name “A. F. Wickham” is found in an Roll of Honor of men who enlisted, printed in the East Elgin Tribune, March 2, 1916.  He is described as of “Aylmer”.
Arthur Wickham was born on February 18, 1893  in Maidstone, Kent, England, the son of Frank Gordon Wickham & Agnes Mary Hamborough.  The family is found on the 1901 England census in Wrotham, Kent, living at “Springcroft”.  Arthur’s father Frank was a poultry farmer, born in Winchester, Hampshire in 1853.  His wife Agnes Mary was born in 1859 in Evenlode, Gloucester.
It is not known when Arthur emigrated to Canada.  A brother, William Gordon Wickham, also emigrated and enlisted in the war.  He was killed in action on July 12, 1916.
Arthur enlisted for service on September 18, 1915 in Aylmer.  He names his next of kin as his mother Agnes, of Ripley, Hampshire, England.  He had belonged to the 30th Battery C.F.A. in Aylmer for one year, and had served two years in the 1st Suffolk Territorials in England.
Arthur returned to Canada from overseas on April 4, 1919, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick. The passenger list states he is returning to his mother in St. Thomas.  No record of his parents emigrated to Canada can be found.
No further information is known.

Thomas Wildridge

401370
The name “Thomas Wildridge” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Lyons.
Thomas Wildridge was born on February 14, 1897 in Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, Wales, the son of Charles & Jane Wildridge, both natives of Hull, Yorkshire, England. The family is found on the 1901 census living at Marble Hall Terrace, Steynton, Pembrokeshire, Wales.  Charles was a fisherman.
Thomas emigrated to Canada as a “Home Child”, at the age of 15, leaving Liverpool on August 3, 1912 on the ship Laurentic, and arriving in Quebec on August 10, 1912.
Thomas enlisted for service on July 30, 1915 in St. Thomas.  His address is not given.  He was a farmer and was single.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Jennie Wildridge of 30 Warwick Road, Milford Haven, Wales.
It is possible that Thomas returned to Wales following the war.  A marriage record was found in 1922 for a Thomas H. Wildridge and Mildred D. Thomas in Pembrokeshire.

Frank Wilkes

02973
Frank Wilkes was born on August 22, 1895 in Birmingham, Warwickshire, England, the son of John & Annie Wilkes. The family is found on the 1901 census living at 72 Leebank Road, Birmingham, England. Frank emigrated to Canada bout 1905, and settled in Toronto with his uncle and aunt, Frederick & Jane Wilkes.  They are found on the 1911 census in Toronto living at 66 Jones Ave.
Frank enlisted for service on July 10, 1915 in London.  He states he was born in Birmingham, England on August 22, 1893. He was a shoemaker and names his next of kin as Arthur Wilkes of 181 Tecumseh Ave., London, Ontario.
Frank was married to Elsie Sanders (1898-1977) in Birmingham, England in December 1917.  Following the war, he returned to Canada with his wife in 1919 and settled in London.  They moved to Port Bruce in 1960.  Frank & Elsie are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  In addition to the family monument, a military marker bears the following inscription:
 “Father – Grandfather Frank Wilkes Private C.A.M.C.  C.E.F.  19 Sept 1968 age 73″
Mr & Mrs Wilkes’ 50th anniversary was reported in the Aylmer Express, December 27, 1967:
PORT BRUCE COUPLE WED FIFTY YEARS
Mr and Mrs Frank Wilkes of Port Bruce will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Dec. 30, 1967 at the home of their eldest son, Eric Wilkes, of 915 Waterloo St., London. Open house will be held there on Saturday afternoon and evening where friends and relatives will be received by the couple.
Mr and Mrs Wilkes met in England, while Mr. Wilkes was serving with the armed forces during World War I. They were married in Birmingham, England in December of 1917 and returned to Canada in 1919 and took up residence in London. On retiring in 1960 from the Canadian Ordinance Depot in London, they moved to Port Bruce and have resided their since.
Mr and Mrs Wilkes held a family dinner on Sunday, Dec. 24, with their two sons respectively, Mr and Mrs Eric Wilkes and Mr and Mrs Norman Wilkes and six grandchildren, all of whom reside in London.
Frank’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, September 25, 1968:
FRANK WILKES
Service for Frank Wilkes of Port Bruce, whose death occurred on Thursday, Sept. 19, 1968, was held at the H. A. Kebbel Funeral Home in Aylmer Monday afternoon.  Rev. Ronald Matthewman of Trinity Anglican Church conducted the service during which Mrs. James Wright played the organ.  The pallbearers were Fred Kristoff, Angus Hughes, Charles Stunder, Hercshel Innis, Thomas Pinch and Sid Varney.  The floral tributes were carried by William Cook, Barry Wilkes, Stephen Wilkes and James White.  Relatives and friends were present from London, Toronto, Windsor, Stayner, Sarnia, Brantford, Aylmer and district.
Born in England 72 years ago, Mr. Wilkes lived in London, Ont., for 50 years prior to retiring in Port Bruce in 1960.  He was a vulcanizer by trade.  He was a member of the Anglican Church as well as being a member of Col. Talbot Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion, Aylmer, and of the First World War Army Navy Veterans Club 229 of London.
He was the son of the late Mr and Mrs John Wilkes of England.  Mr. Wilkes is survived by his wife, the former Elsie Sanders; two sons, Eric and Norman of London; one brother Victor, of Windsor; one sister, Mrs. Reginald (Elsie) Davenport, of Toronto; and six grandchildren.

Arthur Wilkinson

158194
The name Arthur Wilkinson appears on a Springfield Honor roll.  Arthur is found on the 1911 Malahide township census, age 15, a domestic labourer, born April 1896 in England, emigrating in 1910 according to the census. He is living with William & Anna Moore.
Arthur emigrated to Canada from Dr. Barnardo’s home at the age of 11.  He departed from Liverpool of February 21, 1907 on the ship Dominion, arriving in Portland on March 5, 1907.
Arthur enlisted for service on August 23, 1915 in Toronto.  His address is not given, but he states he was born in London, England on April 4, 1893.  He was a lumberman and was not married.  He lists his next of kin as Mrs. E. MacMartin, of Springfield, a friend.
Arthur was discharged from service due to a disability or injury and returned to Canada on February 13, 1918, arriving in Halifax. The passenger list states his destination was Springfield. He is mentioned as a returned soldier in an article in the St. Thomas Times Journal, February 23, 1918 telling of the return of Roy Clunas from overseas.
No further information is known.

John (Jack) Earl Wilkinson

334581
Jack Wilkinson was born on September 7, 1896 in Aylmer, the son of John Wesley Wilkinson (1850-1930) & Margaret A. Manary (1860-1940).  John W. Wilkinson was born in Norfolk County, the son of Henry Wilkinson & Rebecca (Amanda) Culver and was a mechanic living in Courtland when he was married on December 8, 1881 at Lyndoch to Margaret Manary, also of Courtland, daughter of Robert & Elizabeth. John & Margaret moved to Aylmer where he operated a cigar store. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Jack Wilkinson was living in Aylmer working as a drug apprentice when he enlisted for service on November 26, 1917 in London.
Gunner Jack Earl Wilkinson returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Victoria, B.C. on May 5, having sailed from Vladivostok, Russia.
He moved to Michigan in February 1920 to join his brother, F. A. Wilkinson in Royal Oak, Michigan. He is found on the 1930 census in the village of Milford, Oakland County with his wife Bessie and children Marion M., and John A.  He is the proprietor of a drug store.
He died on May 22, 1998 in Almont, Lapeer County, Michigan.

Gordon Williams

1262267  Gordon Williams
Gordon Williams was born on January 1, 1892 in Bayham, the son of George Fillmore Williams (1861-1941) & Ermina J. Harries (1864-1931).  Ermina was the daughter of William Harries & Susan Steel.   A marriage record for George & Ermina could not be found.  They are buried in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.
Gordon was living in Vienna, employed as an automobile salesman when he enlisted for service on May 9, 1916 in Toronto.
He was married on May 11, 1916 in Port Burwell to Holly Natalie Scruton (1892-1921), of Vienna, daughter of Robert Scruton & Mandetta Watts.
A photograph of Gordon was printed in the East Elgin Tribune, December 28, 1916, with the following caption: “Pte. Gordon C. Williams, Motor Transport Driver, France, son of Reeve G. F. & Mrs. Williams, Vienna.  Pte. Williams left for service early last summer and has been into the real life of the battle front. He sent his parents a parcel of relics recently gleaned from the scene of carnage”
Gordon returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on September 29.
Gordon was remarried in 1930 at Lambeth to Mary Frances Shaw (1901-1969).  He died in 1955 and is buried with his second wife, in his parents’ plot in St. Luke’s cemetery, Vienna.

Isaac Burness Williams

166259
Isaac Burness Williams was born on October 7, 1874 at Mount Salem in Malahide, the son of William John Williams (1822-1910) & Sarah Vanwicklin (1840-1911).  William was born in New Brunswick, the son of Thomas & Ann Williams, and was a widower living in Malahide when he was married on April 3, 1860 in Oxford County to Sarah Vanwicklin, a native of Brighton, Ontario, living in Malahide, the daughter of Jacob & Mary Vanwicklin.  They lived at lot 15, concession 4 Malahide, where William was a shoemaker.
Isaac Williams was a carpenter and cement worker living at R. R. #6 St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on October 13, 1915 in St. Thomas at the age of 41.  He was not married and named his sister, Mrs. Norman (Sadie) Grover, 183 Sydenham St., London, as his next of kin.  Isaac was found to be  medically unfit for service on February 28, 1917.  He returned from overseas in 1916, arriving in Halifax on October 31.
An article about Isaac’s return home was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 30, 1916:
Private Isaac Williams, who went overseas with the Pioneers, arrived in Aylmer Friday morning, having been invalided home.  He was a sufferer from being gassed. On account of his intended arrival not being known, no one was at the station to welcome him.  Previous to starting for home, Private Williams saw Col. Mahlon Davis, who he says is now on the road to recovery from the serious injuries received from being thrown from a horse.  It is feared, however, that he will never be in a condition for active service.
He died on his 75th birthday, October 7, 1945 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery with a military marker bearing the following inscription:
Private  Isaac B. Williams  2nd P.N.R., Battn., C.E.F. 7th Oct. 1945  Rest in peace
Isaac’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, October 11, 1945:
ISAAC B. WILLIAMS PASSES ON BIRTHDAY
Carpenter Resided Twenty Years in Port Bruce
The death of Isaac (Ike) Williams occurred at the home of Mrs. Joseph Stevens at Port Bruce on Sunday evening, on the anniversary of his 75th birthday.  For the past twenty years he had made his home with Mrs. Stevens, being a veteran of the First World War during which he served with the Canadian Army.  Mr. Williams was born at Mount Salem, a son of the late Mr and Mrs William Williams, and had lived his entire life in Elgin County, having worked in St. Thomas, prior to moving to Port Bruce.
He had been in failing health for about a year and three weeks ago suffered a severe heart attack from which he never recovered. He was a member of the Canadian Legion and an adherent of the United Church.
Surviving are three brothers, Walter, of Waldo, B.C.; Jake, of St. Thomas, and Orrison, of La Gran, Oregon; and one sister, Mrs. M. Fogarty of East Calgary, Alberta.  The funeral service was held from the James H. Barnum Funeral Home on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with Rev. L. C. Lawson of St. Paul’s United Church, Aylmer, in charge. During the service James H. Barnum sang “God’s Tomorrow”, accompanied by Mrs. McLay Miller.  The pallbearers were John Tuff Jr., Gordon Munro, Clarence Taylor, Harvey Fishbach, Ray Lemon and Harold Nelson. Interment was made in the Aylmer Cemetery.

Mahlon Sylvester Williams

529230  Mahlon Williams
Mahlon Williams was born on May 8, 1894 in Mapleton, the son of George Williams (1860-1940) & Ethelda Bonser (1869-1951).  George was born in Walsingham township, Norfolk county, the son of William & Ann Williams, and was farming there when he was married on January 1, 1888 in Langton to Ethelda Bonser, of Walsingham, the daughter of Ann Bonser.  They lived in South Dorchester and Kingsmill and are buried in Mapleton cemetery.
Mahlon was a teamster living at 18 Ross Street, St. Thomas when he enlisted for service on May 24, 1917 in St. Thomas.  He names his next of kin as his mother “Hilda” of RR #8 St. Thomas. He served with the Army Medical Corps.
Mahlon died on June 17, 1938 in Detroit, age the age of 42.  He is buried with his parents in Mapleton cemetery.
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 23, 1938:
M. S. WILLIAMS
Mahlon Sylvester Williams was born at Mapleton in 1894. He served his county in the World War, and twelve years ago, he took a position in Detroit, where he died suddenly on Friday, June 17th, 1938.
Besides his parents, Mr and Mrs George Williams, of Kingsmill, he is survived by four sisters, Mrs. Jessie Forsythe, of Detroit; Mrs. Carrie Jones, of Aylmer; Mrs. Olive Day, of Detroit; Mrs. Laura Morse, of Aylmer; and two brothers, Leon, at home, and Stanley in Detroit.
The funeral was conducted by T. W. Bradt, of Aylmer Church of Christ, assisted by G. W. Garrod, on Sunday, June 19th, at 2:00 p.m., at the home of his parents in Kingsmill.  Special music was provided by Mrs. Wm. Blanchard, and Miss Mildred Blanchard, of Aylmer. The members of 81 Branch Canadian Legion attended in a body, and took part in the service at the grave, the Last Post being sounded by Comrade C. Porter.  The burial was in Mapleton cemetery.

Oscar Ira Smith Williams

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Oscar was born on August 4, 1889 at Grovesend in Malahide, the son of John Ogden Williams (1844-1913) & Mary Louisa Doolittle (1850-1912). John Williams was born in Bayham, the son of John Smith Williams & Amy Weaver, and was living in Bayham when he was married on March 24, 1869 to Mary Doolittle, a resident of Malahide, the daughter of Ira Scott Doolittle & Sarah Jane Westover. They farmed in Malahide and are buried in Luton cemetery.
Oscar was a fisherman living at R. R. #1 Dunboyne when he enlisted for service on November 18, 1915 in Aylmer. He returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on March 31.  He was invalided home due to pleurisy.
Oscar died in London Township on May 5, 1925 where he had been a patient for two years, suffering from tuberculosis for nine years. He is buried in Aylmer cemetery with a military marker bearing the following inscription:
189380 Private Oscar I. S. Williams, 2nd Battn. C.E.F.  5th May 1925, born 4th Aug. 1889 Rest in Peace
Oscar’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 7, 1925:
OSCAR I. WILLIAMS
A very sad death occurred in the London Hospital on Tuesday afternoon, May 5th, when Oscar I. Williams, of Malahide Township, passed away in his 36th year. Deceased had been fighting for his life for the past three years from the results of being gassed while fighting overseas during the Great War. Oscar Williams enlisted in the 91st Battalion, Elgin’s Own, and served in France with the 2nd Battalion.  He was born at Grovesend, on the 1st concession of Malahide, and had lived his life in this vicinity.  Three brothers survive: Walter, of Malahide; Percy of Port Colborne; and Carl, of Detroit.  The funeral service will be held on Thursday, May 7th at 2 o’clock p.m., at the home of his brother, Walter Williams, Dunboyne, and interment will be made in the Aylmer cemetery.

Charles Edward Willison

481  Charles Willison
Charles Willison was born on December 3, 1883 in Aylmer, the son of Hugh Willison (1857-1934) & Ida Scriber (or Scriver). Hugh Willison was born in Bayham, the son of Evans Willison & Jeffra Harris, and was married on November 17, 1877 in Tillsonburg to Ida Scriver (or Scriber), of Bayham, daughter of Peter Scriver & Mary Brock.  Hugh & Ida and their children are found on the 1901 census in Aylmer.
Charles was a barber living in Aylmer when he was married on March 9, 1904 to Isadora (Dora) Ferguson (1873-1964), a native of Dereham Township living in Aylmer, and daughter of Danford Ferguson & Dora Berdan.
He enlisted for service with the 33rd Battalion on January 20, 1915 in St. Thomas, and had belonged to the 27th Regiment for one year. He states he is a barber and painter, is married and has five children.
Charles died on December 15, 1960 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. His obituary from an undated clipping follows:
CHARLES E. WILLISON DIES IN HOSPITAL
AYLMER – Charles Edward Willison, of 51 Fourth Avenue, Aylmer, passed away Thursday, December 15 at the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital in his 78th year.  He had been in ill health for the past year.
Mr. Willison was born in Elgin County and was a son of the late Mr and Mrs Hugh Willison, of Aylmer. He was a retired painter and decorator and lived all his life in the district.  He was an adherent of the United Missionary Church.
He is survived by his wife, the former Dora Ferguson; two sons, Harold, of Aylmer, and Danny, of Toronto; three daughters, Mrs. Ken (Flossie) Kilmer, Mrs. Ray (Aleta) Temple, and Mrs. David (Elsie) Dale, all of Aylmer. Also surviving are 11 grandchildren, four great grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews. He was the last surviving member of his family.
The remains are resting at the Hughson Funeral Home in Aylmer where a funeral service conducted by Rev. P. G. Lehman, of United Missionary Church, will take place Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Interment will be in the family plot in the Aylmer Cemetery.

William Evans Willison

2750002  William Willison
William Willison was born on November 27, 1884 in Aylmer,  the son of Hugh Willison (1857-1934) & Ida Scriber (or Scriver). Hugh Willison was born in Bayham, the son of Evans Willison & Jeffra Harris, and was married on November 17, 1877 in Tillsonburg to Ida Scriver (or Scriber), of Bayham, daughter of Peter Scriver & Mary Brock.  Hugh & Ida and their children are found on the 1901 census in Aylmer.
He was a labourer living in Aylmer when he was married on November 29, 1904 to Elizabeth Amy Shearer (1884-1961), of Tillsonburg, a native of England and daughter of William Henry Shearer & Alice Rosina Hickey.
William & Elizabeth moved to St. Thomas where he was a teamster and lived at 17 Penwarden Street when he enlisted for service on August 5, 1916 with the 122nd O.S. Battalion.  He returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on March 24.
William died on May 22, 1960 at the age of 76 and is buried in Aylmer cemetery. In addition to the family monument, there is a military marker with the following inscription:
William E. Willison  Private  C.F.C.  L.E.F.  22 May 1960, age 76
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 26, 1960:
WM. WILLISON DIED SUNDAY
A veteran of the 122nd Battalion who served overseas during World War I, William E. Willison of 4th Avenue, Aylmer, died Sunday evening in Westminster Hospital at London. He was in his 75th year.  Mr. Willison was born in Aylmer on Nov. 27, 1885, and spent all his life in this area apart from his overseas duty period.  Mr. Willison was an adherent of the Anglican Church and a member of Branch 81 of the Canadian Legion.  His parents were the late Mr and Mrs Hugh Willison.  Surviving are his wife, the former Elizabeth Shearer; two sons, Fred of Aylmer, and Gordon of Detroit; five daughters, Mrs. John (Alice) Pinnell of Weston; Mrs. Nellie Wilcox and Mrs. Gerald (Amy) Drexler of Toronto; Mrs. Clifford (Violet) Smith of Fingal; and Mrs. Archie (Florence) Cromwell of Avon; one brother, Charles of Aylmer; 21 grandchildren; 20 great grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews. The service was held yesterday afternoon at the Hughson Funeral Home with the Rev. Ronald Matthewman of Trinity Anglican Church officiating.  Interment followed in the Aylmer Cemetery.

George Mitchell Willson

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George Willson was born on June 10, 1895 at Corinth in Bayham, the son of Charles W. Willson & Mary J. Papineau. Charles was the son of Benjamin & Elizabeth Willson and was a blacksmith at Corinth when he was married on August 2, 1893 at Straffordville to Mary J. Papineau, also of Corinth, daughter of Joseph & Jennie Papineau.
George was a cheesemaker living in Sparta when he was married on December 22, 1917 in St. Thomas to Berenice O. Swisher (1901-1979), of St. Thomas, daughter of Marcus & Margaret Swisher.
He and Berenice were living at R. R. #1 Aylmer when he enlisted for service on June 14, 1918 in London.
He died on August 20,  1982 and is buried with his wife in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, August 23, 1982:
WILLSON
At the St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, on Friday, August 20, 1982, George M. Willson, in his 88th year. Dearly loved husband of the late Berenice O. (Swisher) Willson, and dear father of G. L. (Bob), Lloyd, and Joan (Mrs. John Carol), all of St. Thomas; Maxine (Mrs. W. Dick); Donald (Red), and Carol (Mrs. John Dutot), of Windsor. Predeceased by a son Lance Willson and a brother Clarence Willson, of Windsor. Loved grandfather of 22 grandchildren and a number of great and great great grandchildren. The family will receive their friends at the R. E. Allen Funeral Chapel, 31 Elgin Street, St. Thomas. Funeral service will be held in the chapel Tuesday afternoon at 2 p.m. Interment Elmdale Memorial Park Cemetery. Donations tot he Multiple Sclerosis Society would be appreciated by the family.

Carl G. Wilson  Carl Wilson

The name “Carl G. Wilson” is found in a list of names being prepared for the Elgin County Book of Remembrance, which was printed in the St. Thomas Times-Journal in 1927, under Springfield
No attestation paper can be found for a Carl G. Wilson.
Carl G. Wilson, born June 29, 1895 in South Dorchester, the son of Silas R. Wilson (1869-1939) & Celestia O’Neil (1873-1946).  Silas was born in South Dorchester, the son of John Wilson & Ellen Dean, and was farming there when he was married on February 21, 1895 in Belmont to Celestia O’Neil, a native of London township living in South Dorchester, the daughter of John M. & Ellenor O’Neil.  Silas & Celestia are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
A photograph of Carl appeared in the St. Thomas Daily Times, June 16, 1917 with the following caption, under the heading: “S. Dorchester Man in the Flying Corps”
“Carl G. Wilson, eldest son of ex-Reeve S. R. and Mrs. Wilson, of South Dorchester, who was enlisted with the Royal Flying Corps at Toronto. Mr. Wilson is 21 years of age and was a pupil of the St. Thomas Business College before he answered the call of the Empire. He is a popular young man”.
Carl moved to Toronto where he was employed as a motor demonstrator when he was married there on June 29, 1922 to Edna S. Conover, of Matawa, New Jersey, the daughter of Charles H. Conover & Mary Sehanck.
Carl died in July 1975 in Miami, Florida.

Harry Lawrence Wilson

675845  Harry Wilson
Harry Wilson was born on February 10, 1897 in Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.  He emigrated to Canada as a “home child” in 1903, according to the 1911 census.  However, a database of Home Children immigration lists show a Harry Wilson, age 9, arriving in Quebec aboard the ship Dominion on August 11, 1906.
Harry came to live with Clarence T. Anderson (1880-1955) and his wife Mary A. Dowsell (1881-1959), and is found with them on the 1911 census in Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County.
Harry was farming in the Aylmer area when he enlisted for service on April 3, 1916 in Tillsonburg.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. Glidewell, of 9 Old Ford Rd., Bedford, England.  There is record of a marriage between John Glidewell and Eliza Wilson in Bedfordshire in 1915.
While in England, Harry was married to Mabel Queenie Lomagilo in 1917, in Brentford, Middlesex. Harry was invalided back to Canada as “medically unfit” in 1918, arriving in Halifax on February 7. His wife joined him a month later, arriving in Halifax on March 16, 1918.  In July 1919, they returned to England where a daughter, Jean Edna, was born about 1920.  They returned to Canada in 1922, arriving in Quebec on August 18.  The passenger list gives their destination as the home of Clarence Anderson of R.R. #4 Aylmer, their step-parents.
Harry died on December 11, 1972, and is buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, December 12, 1972:
WILSON – At Kincardine General Hospital on Monday, December 11, 1972, Harry Lawrence Wilson of Bervie and formerly of Delaware Township, in his 76th year. Beloved husband of the late M. Queenie (Lomagilo) Wilson; dear father of Mrs. Edward (Jean) Lizmore of Bervie; dear brother of George Wilson of London. Also survived by 4 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren. Resting at the MacLennan Funeral Home, Kincardine, until 10 p.m. Tuesday, thence to the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London after 2 p.m. Wednesday, where funeral service will be conducted on Thursday, December 14 at 1:30 p.m. with Rev. E. J. Humphrey of the Church of the Epiphany officiating. Interment in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. A Masonic service in charge of Delaware Valley, Lodge No. 358 A.F. and A.M. will be conducted at the funeral home Wednesday 8 p.m.

Dwight Percy Wilson

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Dwight Wilson was born on February 26, 1901 in Vienna, the son of Courtlan M. Wilson & Mary Ann Chute.  Courtlan was born in Bayham, the son of James & Sophia Wilson, and was a painter living in Vienna when he was married on August 17, 1892 in Straffordville to Mary Chute, also of Vienna, the daughter of Charles & Helen Chute.
Dwight was a student living with his parents at 139 Hastings Ave., Toronto when he enlisted for service on July 11, 1916 in Toronto.  He had served eleven months in the 9th M.H. as a bugler. He joined the 69th Battery. He enlisted underage and was sent home to Canada in 1917, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on January 29.
Dwight held the distinction of being the second last known surviving Canadian veteran of the Great War.  Following is an article from the Toronto Globe & Mail at the time of his death on May 9, 2007:
Percy  “Dwight”  Wilson, a 106-year-old veteran of the First World War, died early Wednesday, May 9th,  2007 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto,
Percy Dwight Wilson, who hated being called Percy, was born February 26, 1901, in Vienna, Elgin County,  one of nine children of Courtlan Wilson, a storekeeper and decorator, and his wife Mary-Ann “Maisie” Chute.  He was the eldest son of three boys and three girls to survive past the age of five years.  Only one of these six siblings did not live past 90 years of age and that one dying at the age of 88 years.
The Wilsons had come from Yorkshire in 1774 and settled in Nova Scotia. In 1811, the Wilsons, the Edisons and two other families moved to the wilderness of Vienna.  Dwight’s great grandmother was Sarah Jane Edison, daughter of John Edison (lived102 years) and Sarah Ogden, who married James Wilson in 1807 in Nova Scotia and they had five children.  Sarah was a sister to Captain Samuel Edison Sr. (lived 103 years) who was the grandfather of Thomas Alva Edison the inventor (son of Samuel Jr.)   The Edisons got mixed up in the rebellion led by William Lyon Mackenzie in 1837, and Capt. Samuel Edison fled to the United States settling in Ohio.  Dwight Wilson’s family moved to Toronto in June of 1907.
At the age of 14 feeling patriotic and looking for adventure, Mr. Wilson finished Grade 10, joined the local militia as a cadet, where he trained as a mounted bugler. Adding a year to his age, he enlisted in the 69th Battery (artillery) in Toronto on July 11, 1916 as a bugler/trumpeter.  After joining up, he trained at Camp Niagara and Petawawa. For a while he shared a tent with Babe Dye, who went on to win the National Hockey League’s Art Ross Trophy in 1925.
Mr. Wilson was shipped to England that fall on the R.M.S. Grampian, a passenger and mail liner that had been turned into a troop ship. The voyage was rough because the ship was “zig-zagging to avoid submarines,” as Mr. Wilson recalled many years later. He spent most of the two week voyage seasick. When he wasn’t throwing up, he was singing to help quell the nausea in other members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.  In England, his superiors realized their bugle boy was underage so instead of sending him to the front lines in France, transferred him to the 34th Battalion, assigning him to dig trenches and each morning he’d rouse his fellow soldiers at sunrise with “Reveille” and each evening he’d announce “lights out.” .
Although the feared raids on the south-east coast of England never occurred, the Germans did send Gotha twin-engined bombers across the Channel from Belgium in the last 18 months of the war. Mr. Wilson liked to tell the story about seeing the enemy planes flying overhead.
He was sent home in January 1917, more than a year before the Armistice was declared in Nov. 1918 and discharged as a minor.  He apparently signed up again, still under age but the war ended before he could go back overseas.
He began working for Bell Canada in 1919 and worked in a number of positions in southern Ontario over the next 47 years.  He retired in Toronto in 1966 at the age of 65. When asked if he was still getting his pension, which he collected for 41 years, he nodded, smiled and said “I worked a long time.”
In London he studied voice at the University of Western Ontario and in Toronto at the Royal Conservatory of Music. In the 1920’s his rich baritone singing voice graced churches, Massey Hall and in 1928 on one of Canada’s first national radio broadcasts
Dwight Wilson met his wife, singer and pianist Eleanor Dean (born in 1899) while they were both studying voice at the RCM. They were married in 1927. They had two sons, Dean, born in 1928, and who drowned in a duck hunting accident in December 1956 and Paul, who was born in 1934. Growing up his son said, he remembers his father singing scales and practising songs for about two hours a day. “It drove me around the wall because it wasn’t my kind of music.”   Eleanor died in 1993, just before her 94th birthday, and after celebrating their 65th wedding anniversary.
His spirit of patriotism never left him though.  Shortly after World War II began, at the age of  39 and working in Stratford, Mr. Wilson tried to enlist again.  This time instead of being too young he was now too old.   He spent those war years as captain in the Seventh Regiment of the Perth County Reserves based in Stratford.
Mr. Wilson’s  two younger brothers served in the Second World War;  Keith as a fire warden during the London Blitz and Harold served with the Canadian Infantry in Holland.
When France wanted to give medals to all who fought on French soil, our Veterans Affairs did not have an official registry of First World War veterans, so in 1998 officials did an exhaustive search but Mr. Wilson, who didn’t fight in France, went undetected.  Veterans Affairs only learned about him when the recreation director at his retirement home called in the hope Mr. Wilson could be awarded the Queen’s Golden Jubilee medal. Mr. Wilson only received official recognition as one of Canada’s few surviving First World War soldiers when he was 102, more than eight decades after he’d gone overseas to fight for king and country..  Mr. Wilson also received the McCrae Medallion that was awarded to First World War veterans on the 80th anniversary of the end of the war.
A sports fan, he loved the Toronto Blue Jays and the Toronto Maple Leafs, as well as reading, spending time in the summer at the family cottage in the Haliburton area, going out for lunch and entertaining fellow residents at his retirement home by singing classic songs.
Cedar Croft Place Retirement Home in Oshawa was  where he had lived since the late 1990’s., There on Sunday March 5, 2006 , Bro. Dwight Wilson was  honoured by the Rehoboam Lodge No. 65 for his 80 years of service as a Freemason.   Mr. Wilson also attended Remembrance Day ceremonies at his retirement residence and then went to an Oshawa Generals’ hockey game and was officially recognized by the team as part of its Remembrance Day program.
A handsome man with chalk white hair and a trim mustache, he greeted visitors at his retirement home in December 2005 and entertained them with several verses of the Rogers and Hammerstein ballad “If I Loved You”  in a clear, melodious voice, wearing a grey double-breasted suit with a white pinstripe, white shirt and grey tie.  He had trouble hearing, wore gold-rimmed glasses to help with his failing vision, but was alert and sat upright in his wheelchair as he chatted about the world 80 years ago when he volunteered to fight for king and country.
Mr. Wilson moved in June of 2006 to  the Veteran’s Care Wing of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto where he was often heard singing and taking part in the daily entertainment program  in the Veterans Hall., and where he died Wednesday, May 9th, 2007.
Mr. Wilson attributed his long life to the fact that he never smoked, never lied (except about his age) and attended church, but longevity does run in his family.  Mr. Wilson is survived by his son Paul, four grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.  A private funeral service was held with military honours for family members and invited guests.
Mr. Wilson was the last veteran still living in Canada. His passing follows the death of Lloyd Clement also at Sunnybrook Hospital  on Feb. 21, 2007 at the age of 107.  This leaves only one surviving veteran of The Great War. — John “Jack”  Babcock, now 106 years old.  Mr. Babcock became a U.S. citizen 60 years ago and now lives in Spokane, Washington.  Jack Babcock also escaped combat because he too was under age.  By October 1918, Mr. Babcock, then 18 years old,  was awaiting training that would send him to France but Germany’s surrender in November ended the war.
Some 650,000 Canadians served in World War I of which about 66,000 were killed and another 172,000 were wounded.
Extracted from CTV Globemedia, Globe and Mail, the Star.com, the ontariomason.com and blogofdeath.com
The London Free Press, May 10, 2007 carried the following article about Dwight Wilson’s death:
AND THEN THERE WAS ONE
First World War Veteran Dwight Wilson Dies at age 106; leaving only John Babcock
by Gregory Bonnell and Keith Leslie, Canadian Press
TORONTO – Dwight Wilson’s dogged determination to join his countrymen in the trenches of the First World War drove him to enlist not once, but twice, despite news reports chronicling the “horrendous” conflict being waged in Europe.
Wilson, who was diverted from the frontlines because was a minor, died yesterday.  He was 106 and his death leaves only one known surviving Canadian veteran of the First World War – 106 year old John Babcock, who lives in Spokane, Wa.
“All these guys who signed up realized there were risks involved, especially by 1916″, Wilson’s only son Paul said of the generation of young men who volunteered to serve despite horrific battlefield losses.
Ten per cent of the roughly 600,000 Canadians who enlisted to fight in the First World War died on the battlefields of Europe – 170,000 more were wounded.  The war would ultimately claim 15 million civilian and military lives on both sides of the conflict.  “I think maybe in 1914, when the war broke out, some of the young boys signing up thought it would be a lark”, Wilson said. “By 1916, there had been thousands upon thousands of them just killed. They had some horrendous battles”.
It was in that climate that a 15 year old Wilson, who had served as a bugler in the 9th Mississauga Horse militia a year earlier, headed overseas in the fall of 1916 despite his parents’ objections.  “There aren’t many of them left, are there?” Wilson said in November 2006 when asked how it felt to be one of the few remaining veterans of the First World War.  “I was a kid”, Wilson said his experience.  He recalled that his singing went “over big” with his fellow soldiers in England.
Wilson, born in Vienna, south of Tillsonburg, sang semi-professionally after the war. He charmed reporters who visited him in the veterans’ wing of Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital last November with a surprisingly powerful rendition of If I Loved You. “I love to sing and I’ll sing anywhere”, he said.
Just how a determined, yet underage, soldier found himself enlisted in active service remains a bit of a mystery.  “I don’t know if he really lied about his age, or whether someone fudged it”, said Paul Wilson.  “This is 1916. The best troops in Europe and the Allies had already been cut to pieces.  I think they were scrambling”.
Babcock emigrated to the U.S. in the 1920s, serving a brief stint in the U.S. military.

Ralph Emerson Wilson

Ralph Wilson was born on August 11, 1894 in Waitsburg, Washington, U.S.A.  He served with the United States Field Artillery, and was living in Pullman, Washington when he enlisted at the age of 22. He was a student at Washington State College, and had served two years as a Private in the Cadet Corps at the College.
Ralph came to Aylmer about 1920 where he was employed at the Carnation Company.  Upon retirement in 1962, he moved to Los Angeles, and died on March 18, 1973 in Medford, Oregon.  He and his wife Olive F. Bruning (1893-1982) are buried in Aylmer Cemetery.  His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, April 4, 1973:
Ralph E. Wilson
Burial took place at Aylmer cemetery ten days ago of the ashes of Ralph Emerson Wilson, former superintendent of the Carnation Co. Ltd. here who died at the age of 78, March 18, at his home in Medford, Oregon. His only son, Robert G. Wilson, also of Medford, came to Aylmer for the committal service.
Mr. Wilson was born in 1894 at Waitsburg, Washington, moved to Sunnyside, Wash., and was graduated from Washington State University as a B.Sc in chemistry in 1918.
He served in the U.S. Field Artillery until 1919 when he joined Carnation at Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. He was married to Olive F. Bruning in Colfax, Wash., the same year and was transferred to Aylmer about 1920 as a chemist in the laboratory, then plant foreman and eventually assistant manager.
In 1934 when the late J. P. Coyle moved to Toronto as Canadian vice-president, Mr. Wilson became plant manager. Later he was appointed superintendent of Canadian operations and supervised the construction of a plant at Sherbrooke, Quebec.
In 1951, he was appointed managing director of the company then expanding into Australia with offices at Melbourne. He moved there and was in charge of construction of an evaporated milk plant.
Upon retirement in 1962, the Wilsons moved to Los Angeles where their son Bob was working with the company. A few years later he moved to Medford and persuaded his parents to move to an apartment there.  The Wilsons kept in touch with their many friends in Aylmer and returned for visits on several occasions, the last in 1968.
During their 30 years residence in Aylmer, Mr. Wilson was a member of Aylmer Rotary Club and its pianist. He was a past master of Malahide Lodge 140 AF & AM and a member of St. Paul’s United Church. Many years ago his company sponsored a baseball team that won the Ontario championship. He was a member of the first committee of Aylmer Boys Band which Alfred Grimes organized and became its leader. Mr. Wilson was interested in music and thus the organization of Aylmer Rotary Minstrels.
His wife, Olive, resides at Rouge Valley Manor, Apt. 608, Medford, Oregon, 97501, and his son Bob at 1301 Mira Mar Ave., Medford, Oregon, 97501. There are three grandchildren, Richard, Patricia and Edward; and a brother A. Gordon Wilson, Sunnyside, Washington.
Mr. Wilson was a member of the Rotary 35 years; a member of the Presbyterian Church, Northridge, California; and of Sigma Nu Fraternity.
The funeral was arranged by Siskiyou Funeral Service, 2100 Siskiyou Boulevard, Medford, 97501 and the family requested that friends wishing to make contributions to his memory do so to Rogue Valley Manor Health Centre, 1200 Mira Mar Ave., Medford. The Rev. Norman Jones of St. Paul’s United Church conducted the service at the family plot in Aylmer Cemetery.

Walter Watson Wilson

190144
Walter Wilson’s name is found in a list of recruits for the 91st Battalion, printed in the Aylmer Express, April 13, 1916. He is listed as single, of Aylmer, and a member of the 30th Battery.
Walter Wilson was born on May 22, 1894 in Aylmer, the son of George Henry Wilson (1855-1925) & Margaret Mitchell (1855-1936). George was born in Tillsonburg, the son of Alexander & Freelove Wilson, and was a butcher living in Tillsonburg when he was married on September 30, 1874 in Ingersoll to Margaret Mitchell, of Dereham, daughter of Charles & Eliza Mitchell.  The family is found on the 1911 census in Aylmer, where George is operating a laundry. George & Margaret are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Walter’s attestation is not available for viewing in the National Archives of Canada database.
Before Walter left for service in the war, he was married in Aylmer on July 13, 1916 to Mabel McAllister, a native of Vienna living in Aylmer. Walter gives his occupation as electrician.
The St. Thomas Journal of Oct. 11, 1916 lists Pte. Walter Wilson among the wounded.
When his mother died in 1936, Walter was living in St. Thomas. No further information can be found.

Louis David Winder

334926
Louis Winder was born on May 18, 1891 in Malahide, the son of John Newton Winder (1863-1941) & Myrtle Belle Pierce (1866-1940).  John was born in Jarvis, the son of Jonathan & Ellen Winder, and was a cheesemaker living in Aylmer when he was married on April 23, 1891 in London to Myrtle Pierce, of Aylmer, born in Port Burwell the daughter of Lewis & Nancy Pierce.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Louis was moved to Niagara Falls where he was living at 139 Welland Ave., employed as a telegraph operator when he enlisted for service on May 25, 1916 at Guelph.
He was living in Ottawa working as a telegraph operator when he was married in Cayuga on May 29, 1918 to Irene Percy Stevenson (1892-1974), of Cayuga, the daughter of John Stevenson & Mary Sinclair.  They were living in Ottawa when two sons were born: John Stevenson Winder (1919) and Charles Gordon Winder (1922).
Louis died on October 1,  1981 and is buried with his wife in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, London. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, October 6, 1981:
WINDER
Louis D. Winder, 66 Grand Avenue, London, passed away suddenly October 1st, 1981 at Victoria Hospital, Westminster Campus in his 91st year.  Husband of Irene Winder (1975). Beloved father of Dr. John S. Winder, London; Dr. C. Gordon Winder, London. Brother of Mrs. Ethel Thayer, London and Tom Winder, Detroit, Michigan. Also survived by eight grandchildren and one great granddaughter. He was manager of C.N. Telegraph until his retirement. Life long member of London Rotary Club. Memorial Service will be held at Calvary United Church, Friday, October 9th at 1:30 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to the Thames Valley Children’s Centre, 385 Hill Street, London or the Rotary Foundation 319 Dufferin Avenue, London, Ontario

Alfred Ernest Winnington-Ingram

112073 / 7425
Alfred E. Winnington-Ingram was born on May 26, 1891 at Grovesend in Malahide Township, the son of Francis Herbert Winnington-Ingram (1854-1928) & Emily Jane Hankinson (1861-1927),  who were married in Malahide on October 20, 1880. Francis was a farmer at Grovesend (lot 22, concession1 Malahide), and was born  in England, the son of Rev. Edward W. Ingram & Maria Louisa Pepys.  Francis emigrated to Canada about 1876.  His wife Emily Jane was born at Grovesend, the daughter of William Hankinson & Sophia McConnell. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  Alfred’s brother, Frances Harold Winnington-Ingram, was killed in action on May 20, 1915.
Alfred was a student when he enlisted for service on February 23, 1915 in London. He names his next of kin as his father, F. W. Ingram, of Grovesend.  Both service numbers, above, are given on his attestation paper. He gained the rank of 2nd Lieutenant in service of the Royal Garrison Artillery.
Alfred returned from overseas in  1919, arriving in Quebec on July 14.. He became an Anglican minister and was living in Hespeler when he was married in Brantford on August 28, 1926 to Elizabeth Frances Hill, of Brantford, the daughter of Edward William Roberts Hill.  Alfred & Elizabeth had no children. Their marriage was reported in the Aylmer Express, September 2, 1926:
Rev. Winnington-Ingram died on August 5, 1945 in Midland at the age of 54 years., and is buried in St. Mark’s cemetery there. His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, August 9, 1945:
REV. A. E. WINNINGTON-INGRAM PASSES
Former Malahide Resident and Brother of Charles Ingram Passes Suddenly at Midland
Word of the sudden death of Rev. Alfred E. Winnington-Ingram was received by his brother, Mr. Charles W. Ingram, R.R. 2 Aylmer on Sunday. Rev. Ingram suffered a severe heart attack at his home in Midland on August 5th from which he never regained consciousness. Aged 54 years, he had been rector of St. Mark’s Anglican Church at Midland for more than 10 years.  A son of the late Mr and Mrs Frank Winnington Ingram, he was born on the First Concession of Malahide and was a nephew of the former Bishop of London, England, the Rt. Rev. Arthur Foley Winnington-Ingram. He graduated from Aylmer High School and Huron College, London, and had been Rector of churches at Otterville, Hespeler and Midland.
Rev. Ingram was dean of the Diocese of East Simcoe.  He was past president of the Kiwanis Club, a member of the Board of Education and the Public Library Board in Midland.
Surviving are his wife, the former Betty Hill, of Aylmer; one brother, Charles Ingram, R.R. 2 Aylmer; and three sisters, Mrs. Constance Breay, Mrs. Howard McClennan and Mrs. Harold Caradus, all of Toronto.
The funeral service was held in St. Mark’s Church, Midland, on Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock with interment in St. Mark’s cemetery.

Ethel Grace Winnington-Ingram

Nursing Sister
Grace Winnington-Ingram was born on April 20, 1882 in Malahide, the daughter of Francis Herbert Winnington-Ingram (1854-1928) & Emily Jane Hankinson (1861-1927),  who were married in Malahide on October 20, 1880. Francis was a farmer at Grovesend (lot 22, concession1 Malahide), and was born  in England, the son of Rev. Edward W. Ingram & Maria Louisa Pepys.  Francis emigrated to Canada about 1876.  His wife Emily Jane was born at Grovesend, the daughter of William Hankinson & Sophia McConnell. They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.  Grace’s brother, Frances Harold Winnington-Ingram, was killed in action on May 20, 1915.
Grace was living at 569 Picadilly Street, London employed as a nursing sister, when she enlisted with the C.A.M.C. on April 18, 1918 in London.  Her date of birth is given as April 20, 1888, but her birth registration states 1882.  Grace returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on August 4.
Grace was married on August 21, 1926 to Harold Rigg Carradus of Toronto.  They were living in Toronto in 1928.

Elmer Leone Winter

100205
Elmer Winter was born on July 22, 1889 in Bayham, the son of John L. Winter (died 1942) & Mary Elizabeth Archer (1859-1923).  John was born in Walsingham Township, the son of James & Jane Winter, and was farming there when he was married on January 31, 1883 in Bayham to Mary Elizabeth Archer, of Bayham, the daughter of William Archer & Elizabeth Moore. They moved to London and later to Kent County where Mary died in 1923.  She and John are buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Sarnia.
Elmer was employed as a printer when he enlisted for service on July 1, 1915 in Edmonton. He names his mother Elizabeth Archer of 156 Emery Street, London. Elmer returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on May 14.
No further information is known.

Camby Earl Wintermute

781776
Camby Wintermute was born on June 19, 1891 at Corinth, the son of George Warren Wintermute (born 1863) & Henrietta Agnes Best (born 1868).  George was born in Bayham, the son of Thomas & Mary Wintermute, and was farming there when he was married on May 22, 1886 in Dereham to Henrietta Best, also of Bayham, the daughter of Casper Best & Maud Kerr. By 1901 they had moved to Tilbury in Essex County where they are found on the census there.  They moved to Moosejaw, Saskatchewan where Henrietta & Camby are found on the 1911 census.
Camby was a farmer living at Archive, Saskatchewan when he enlisted for service on January 8, 1916 in Moosejaw.  He names his next of kin as his mother, Henrietta, of Bohern, Saskatchewan.  He joined the 128th Batttalion.
When his brother Perry died in 1953, Camby was living in Port Arthur. No further information is known.

Perry Wintermute

926001
Perry Wintermute was born on March 30, 1887 probably in Bayham township, the son of George Warren Wintermute (born 1863) & Henrietta Agnes Best (1868).  George was born in Bayham, the son of Thomas & Mary Wintermute, and was farming there when he was married on May 22, 1886 in Dereham Township to Harriette Best, of Bayham, the daughter of Casper & Maud Best.  George died in 1903 and is buried in Best Cemetery, Corinth.
Perry moved to Weyburn, Saskatchewan where he was farming when he enlisted for service on July 15, 1916 at Camp Hughes, Manitoba.  He names his next of kin as his sister, Mrs. Charles Howell, of Archive, Saskatchewan. The 1911 census shows Charles Howell and his wife Viola living in Moosejaw.  Perry enlisted with the 152nd Battalion.
Perry returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Halifax on January 25. He was married to Florence Johnston.
Perry died on September 23, 1953 and is buried in Richmond West Cemetery, Bayham township.  The following inscription appears on a marker there:
“Perry Wintermute Private 5th Battn C.E.F.  23 Sept 1953 age 66″
His obituary appeared in the St. Thomas Times-Journal, September 24, 1953:
WINTERMUTE – On Wednesday morning, Sept. 23, 1953, at his home, 255 Saskatoon Street, London, Ont., Perry Wintermute, formerly of St. Thomas; husband of Mrs. Florence (Johnston) Wintermute, London, Ont., father of Miss Lois, Victoria, B.C.; and Mrs. C. R. DeMille, London, Ont.; brother of Camby Wintermute, Port Arthur; Mrs. Florence Daley in California; Mrs. Ila Gregson and Mrs. Ola Howell, both in Saskatchewan; and Miss Minnie Howe, in Montana; grandfather of Gerald and Lynn DeMille, London, Ont.; suddenly in his 67th year.  Resting at the Jas. H. Barnum Funeral Home, Aylmer; funeral service there Friday at 2 p.m., to be conducted by Rev. Wood, Broderick Memorial Baptist church, St. Thomas. Interment in Best Cemetery, Corinth.[sic]

Arville Wolfe

3138897  Arville Wolfe
Arville Wolfe was born on September 16, 1895 in Straffordville, the son of Henry Wolfe (1865-1953) & Emma Dennis (1875-1933).  Henry was born in Bayham, the son of Barnhardt Wolfe & Mary A. Sherk, and was farming there when he was married on January 24, 1893 in Vienna to Emma Dennis, also of Bayham, the daughter of William Dennis & Eliza Hagadorn.  They are buried in Straffordville cemetery.
Arville  was a farmer at Straffordville when he enlisted for service on June 17, 1918 in London.
He married Florence Castle (1900-1978).  Arville died on December 27, 1970 and is buried with his wife in Straffordville cemetery.
His obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, December 28, 1970:
ARVILLE WOLFE
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon of Arville Wolfe, RR 4 Aylmer, a former resident of Straffordville who died Sunday in his 76th year.  The service will be conducted at the Ostrander Funeral Home, Tillsonburg, at 2 p.m. by the Rev. Willy Ziegler of Corinth United Church. Burial will be in Straffordville Cemetery.
Mr. Wolfe is survived by his wife, Florence (Castle); a son Edmund Wolfe, RR 2 Aylmer; a daughter, Mrs. June Twining, RR 4 Aylmer; two brothers, Kenneth Wolfe, RR 4 Aylmer, and Earnest of Thamesford; and one granddaughter.

John William Wonnacott

3133842
John William Wonnacott was born on January 31, 1900 at Port Bruce in Malahide, the son of Merton Wonnacott (1872-1909) & Louise Reid (1878-1934).  Merton was the son of William Wonnacott & Edith Ann Jay, and was a native and resident of Port Bruce when he was married on February 1, 1898 to Louise Reid, a resident of Mount Salem.  She was born in Uxbridge, the daughter of John Reid & Sarah Stewart.  About 1911, Louise and her son John moved to London, where she was married in 1912 to James Georgeson.
John William Wonnacott was employed as a locomotive fireman and living with his mother at 417 Ottaway Ave., London, Ont., when he enlisted for service on May 9, 1918.
He was still living at the same address and a locomotive engineer when he was married on November 9, 1922 in London to Verna Irene Hammond, a stenographer, born in Paisley, Ont., the daughter of George Hammond & Edith Chambers.  Verna was living at 301 Wharncliffe Road North, London.
John died on February 12, 1961 and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, London. His wife’s name on the monument is Gladys M. Ong.  His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, February 13, 1961:
WONNACOTT – At his late residence, 417 South St., on Sunday, Feb. 12, 1961, John William, beloved husband of Gladys M. (Ong) Wonnacott, and dear uncle of Robert Sawyer.  Resting in the Geo E. Logan and Sons Funeral Chapel, 371 Dundas St., for service on Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 1:30 p.m. Interment in Woodland Cemetery.

Mark Ethelbert Wonnacott

270374
Mark Wonnacott was born on August 11, 1871 at Port Bruce in Malahide, the son of George William Wonnacott  (1843-1906) & Mary Eliza Derry (1842-1930).  George was the son of George Wonnacott & Harriet Paye, and was married on Dec. 19, 1860 in Kingston, Ontario to Mary Derry, a native of Kingston, and daughter of Richard & Mary Eliza Derry.
Mark was living in London employed as a wood turner when he was married on March 24, 1898 to Margaret Eliza Frances, a resident of Hawtrey, South Norwich, Ontario.  She was a native of Houghton Township, Norfolk Co., the daughter of Charles Frances & Susanna Springsted.
Mark was living at 103 Wellington Street, Brantford, when he enlisted for service at the age of 43 years on June 3, 1916 at Burford.  He was a painter, and belonged to the 38th Dufferin Rifles.  He enlisted with the 215th Battalion.
Mark died at Brantford General Hospital on January 7, 1926 at the age of 53 from a stroke.  He is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Brantford.
His obituary appeared in the Brantford Expositor, January 7, 1926:
MARK WONNACOTT
The death took place at the hospital today of Mark Wonnacott, who resided at 103 Wellington street.  Deceased, who was 53 years of age, had suffered from a lingering illness.  He was born in Port Bruce, but had lived in Brantford for nearly thirty years. He is survived by his wife; his mother, Mrs. Margaret Wonnacott, this city; one sister and five brothers: Mrs. Geo. Channer, London; Edward, London; Frank, Charles, George and Arthur, Detroit. The funeral arrangements have not yet been made.
 

Beverley Edward Wood

675824
Beverley Wood’s name is found in a list of recruits for the 91st Battalion, printed in the Aylmer Express, April 13, 1916. He is listed as single, of Aylmer, and was in the High School cadets.
He was born on July 11, 1901 in Tillsonburg, the son of John Edward Howell Wood & Alice Maude Swayze.  John Wood was born in Ingersoll, the son of Thomas Wood & Esther Howell, and was a merchant in Tillsonburg when he was married there on September 7, 1898 to Alice Swayze, a native of Welland, living in Tillsonburg, the daughter of Stephen Swayze & Louisa Jane Frost.  The family is found in the 1911 census in Tillsonburg.
Beverley was living in Tillsonburg when he enlisted for service there on March 30, 1916.  He gives his date of birth as July 11, 1900, and names his next of kin as his father, Mr. E. J. Wood of Tillsonburg.  He was a student and was not married.
No further information can be found.

Clarence Lee Wood

46552 / 510249
Clarence Wood was born on August 2, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of Charles Burton Wood (1854-1933) & Ida E. Westover (1873-1943).  Charles was the son of John & Mariella Wood, and was a harness maker in Aylmer when he was married there on September 6, 1879 to Ida Westover, also of Aylmer, the daughter of Lewis & Eliza Louise Westover.  Charles & Ida are buried in West Ave. Cemetery, St. Thomas.
Clarence enlisted for service the first time at Valcartier on September 28, 1914 with a service number of 46552.  He was a machinist who had served one year in the C.A.S.C.  His next of kin was his mother, Ida, of 488 York Street, London.  A second attestation paper bearing the service number of 510249 is dated September 16, 1915 at London.  It states that he served in the 1st Canadian Contingent.  His occupation is trainman, and his mother is now living at 224 Maitland St., London.  A notation states that he was transferred from # 2 C.A.S.C. to 4th Division on April 22, 1916.
Clarence returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Montreal on July 5.  He returned to London, where he was employed as an assistant hostler when he was married on September 14, 1920 in London to Minnie Belle Hewitt (1900-1983), also of London, daughter of Judge Hewitt & Mary Gibson.
Clarence died on June 19, 1958 and is buried with Minnie in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas. His obituary appeared in the London Free Press, June 19, 1958:
CLARENCE L. WOOD DIES, AGED 60
Clarence Lee Wood, 60, of 430 King St., employed as a receiver with the Central Ordinance Depot on Highbury Ave., died early today at Victoria Hospital.  Surviving are his wife, the former Minnie Hewitt; two daughters, Mrs. Frank (Isabel) Hodginson, Delaware; and Mrs. Leslie (Mary) Payne, London; three sons, William, Ralph and Robert, all of London.
The body is at the Evans Funeral Home, Hamilton Road, where services will be conducted Saturday at 2:30 p.m. by the Rev. B. C. Eckardt, of Church of Christ Disciples. Interment will be in Elmdale Cemetery, St. Thomas.

Maitland Marshall (Tony) Wood

11415
Maitland Wood was born on December 2, 1895 at Hartington in Portland Township, Frontenac County, the son of John C. Wood, a merchant, & Josephine Morrison.
Known as “Tony”, he moved to Aylmer prior to 1914 and was on the staff of the Royal Bank. He enlisted for service on September 23, 1914, and names his next of kin as his mother, Mrs. J. C. Wood, of 777 Water Street, Peterborough, Ont.  He had served four years in the Peterborough cadets, and three months with the 38th Regiment.
The Aylmer Express published a letter from Tony Wood in its December 31, 1914 issue:
AN INTERESTING LETTER
From Tony Wood, with the First Canadian Contingent at Salisbury Plains, England
Dear Sir – There is a big gale on tonight.  I had to leave my tent because I could not keep the candle lit, it may be down when I get back. I am in the Y.M.C.A. tent now. One end nearly blown out and every now and then we all start to yell[?] out thinking it is coming down.  I got your letter tonight together with Eric’s and Roy Morris’.  I have ten other letters to answer from Aylmer, Peterboro, Burlington, etc. I wrote a letter to mother and it was published in three papers.  I am 19 years old today.  I have strained my heels several times but think they will be better in a short time. This morning we had a sham battle over a trench.  I do not know who won, but in my opinion we were all killed.  I have altogether forgotten how to eat at a table. I eat either standing up or sitting on my blankets.  I am having a better time that I would have had as there are a lot of my Peterboro friends here, and I spend most of my time with them.  I am much happier here than I was in Aylmer because I didn’t know what discomforts were, but here I expect the worst, so I don’t mind it.  I sure will appreciate Aylmer when I get back just the same, where I will be able to sleep on a bed, not on the floor.  I expect to go to London before long. The English where we go expect when they see the Canadian uniform that we are all millionaires by the way they talk. Some of the fellows get away with about 8 pounds, but they bit the can.
Yours truly, Tony Wood.  Dec. 2, 1914.
The December 16, 1915 issue of the Aylmer Express reported that Pte. M. M. Wood had been wounded, accompanied by his photograph:
Private M. M. (Tony) Wood, who is officially reported as wounded.  “Tony” who was on the Royal Bank staff here, answered the first call for volunteers, and left with his old Peterborough company for the front.  He was attached tot he 4th Battalion, and for a year and a half seemed to bear a charmed life. Men fell all around him, and none of his old comrades remained. Previous to the present wound, Tony’s nearest approach to injury was when a bullet clipped the heel from one of his shoes.  Last month he was granted a furlough, a part of which was spent in London, when a photo was taken, from which the above cut was made.  It is evident that the hardships of trench life told upon his health.  No particulars are at hand as to the extent of the wounds received, but his host of friends here sincerely hope they are not serious. His parents reside at 777 Water Street, Peterborough.  Just before going to press yesterday the Express received a letter from Maitland’s mother, which stated that the only particulars known were that he had received a gunshot wound in the leg and had been officially admitted to No. 8 Stationary Hospital at Wimereuax, on Dec. 4. The report would indicate that his wound is not serious and we sincerely trust such is the case.
Private Wood recovered from his wounds and served the duration of war, returning to Canada on December 30, 1918.  He resumed his occupation as a bank clerk, and was living at 565 Euclid Ave., Toronto, when he was married on January 1, 1924 in Midland, to Myrtle McMurtry, a school teacher living in Midland, the daughter of Thomas & Minnie McMurtry.
No further information is known.

Harold H. Woolley

A letter from Harold H. Woolley was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 16, 1916.  It is believed this man is Harold Hughes Woolley (#84251), who was born on March 30, 1889 at Burton on Trent, Staffordshire, England, the son of William Woolley & Lizzie Jane Hughes.  He is found on the 1901 census at the Princess Alice Orphanage in Sutton, Coldfield, Warwickshire.  He emigrated to Canada as a “home child”, at the age of 18,  leaving Liverpool on October 3, 1907 on the ship Canadian, and arriving in Quebec on October 11, 1907.
Harold’s attestation paper does not give his address, but he enlisted for service on March 5, 1915 in Guelph.  He names his next of kin as his brother Wilfred Woolley, of Willsonville, Ontario. He was a student and not married.  It is presumed he was living in the Aylmer area at this time.
The letter written by Harold is as follows:
SOCKS A GODSEND
16th Battery Man Thanks Miss McCausland For Patriotic Work
France, Oct. 22, 1916
Dear Miss McCausland:
I am writing you a short note to thank you for the socks you so kindly sent out. They were very much appreciated as they came at a most opportune time. We had been working the night before in the mud, and had wet socks as a matter of course. I had no change and no chance to dry them, so when these socks came along in the morning they were a regular Godsend. I wish you would thank the ladies of the Travel Club for me. I expect the rest of the boys will be dropping a line too.
Again thanking you for your kindness,
Yours sincerely, Harold H. Woolley, Bdr., 16th Battery, 2nd Can. Division
Harold was medically discharged, possibly due to injuries, and returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in Halifax on November 14.  The passenger list states he was a farmer, and his address is given as Brantford.
Harold died on April 22, 1931 at the age of 42.  He was living at 28 Glendale Crescent, Hamilton.  He was a sales manager and had lived at that address for 15 years. The informant on his death registration was his wife, Marion. He is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Hamilton
His monument reads as follows: “Harold Hughes Woolley 84251 Bmbr 16th Bty F.A., C.E.F.  March 30, 1880 – Apr. 22, 1931″
Harold’s obituary appeared in the Hamilton Spectator, April 23, 1931:
HAROLD HUGHES WOOLLEY
A well-known resident and prominent business man of this city passed away last evening in the person of Harold Hughes (Doc) Woolley, sales manager of the Dominion Natural Gas company, at his home, 28 Glendale Crescent. He had been ill since last October. The deceased, who was 42 years of age, had lived in Hamilton for the past 15 years, coming to this city from Galt, where he was well known and enjoyed the esteem of a wide circle of friends. Mr. Woolley attended the United Church, and was a member of the Hugh Murray Lodge, A.F. & A.M. During the Great War he went overseas with the 16th Battery in 1915, as a master gunner, and in 1917 was gassed. Besides his wife he leaves one brother, Wilfrid of Wilsonville, Ont., and two sisters, Mrs. Jack Davies, Rock Ferry, England, and Mrs. John Chambers, Goole, England. The funeral will take place on Saturday afternoon at 1:45 p.m., from the funeral chapel of J. H. Robinson & Co. Limited. Interment will take place in Woodland cemetery.

George Stephen Wooton

3130596
George Wooton was born on March 19, 1897 in West Oxford Township, Oxford County, the son of Frederick George Wooton & Bertha Jane Lightheart.  Frederick was born about 1875 in West Oxford, the son of Stephen & Elizabeth Wooton, and was a farmer at Beachville when he was married on January 28, 1896 in West Oxford, to Bertha Jane Lightheart, of Beachville, the daughter of George & Elizabeth Lightheart.
George Wooton was a farmer living at Woodstock when he enlisted for service on Jan. 4, 1918 in London.  He was not married, and named his father, Frederick, of Grand Island, Buffalo, New York, as his next of kin. George returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Quebec on May 13.
George was a cheesemaker living in Malahide Township, when he was married on February 24, 1920 in Ingersoll to Nora Mae Ryckman (1898 – 1983), also of Malahide, the daughter of Isaac Ryckman & Olive Light.
George & Nora celebrated their 40th anniversary in 1960.  He died in May 1965 and is buried with his wife in Light Cemetery, Bayham Township.  His name appears on the cenotaph in Vienna.
George’s obituary appeared in the Aylmer Express, May 26, 1965:
GEORGE S. WOOTON
VIENNA – George S. Wooton, the Vienna postmaster, died Sunday at Victoria Hospital, London, Ont. He was buried Tuesday in the Burial Light Cemetery here.  A Royal Canadian Legion service was held last night by members of the Port Burwell-Vienna branch of the Legion. Mr. Wooton is survived by his wife, the former Nora Ryckman; two daughters, Mrs. Jerry (Gwen) Segers, of Vienna; Mrs. William (Maureen) Alward, of Straffordville; one sister, Mrs. Edith Keenan, of Toronto.

Guy Davies Worcester

84248
The name “Guy Davies Worcester” is found in an Roll of Honor of men who enlisted, printed in the East Elgin Tribune, March 2, 1916.  He is described as “of Aylmer”.
Unfortunately, Guy’s attestation paper is not available for viewing.  Very little information can be found on him.  There is a Guy Worcester, age 6, found on the 1901 census in England, living with his widowed mother Alice, in Tottenham, Middlesex, England.  The census states that Guy was born in Islington, London.
No other information can be found.

Richard James Wright

333840  Richard Wright
Richard Wright was born on March 27, 1890 in Aylmer, the son of Horace H. Wright (1850-1935) & Lucy Winchester (1850-1939).  Horace was born in West Flamborough Township, the son of Richard & Caroline Wright, and was a mechanic living in Aylmer when he was married there on February 18, 1873 to Lucy Winchester, the daughter of Aaron & Elizabeth Winchester.  Lucy was born in Walpole Township, Haldimand County, but was living in Sparta when married. Horace was later a tinsmith and hardware merchant. Mr. Wright was also served as mayor of Aylmer.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Richard Wright was a school teacher living in Aylmer when he was married on February 4, 1911 in St. Thomas to Lila Marie Winder, of Aylmer, the daughter of John Winder & Myrtle Pierce.
Richard was living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on April 7, 1916 in Guelph.  He had served as a Sergeant Major in the 30th Battery, C.F.A.
A photograph and letter of “Dick” was printed in the Aylmer Express, July 19, 1917:
GUNNER R. J. WRIGHT
Gives an Interesting Report of Some of the Sports and Contests Enjoyed
Just Behind the Battle Lines
We are permitted to publish the following extracts from a letter received by Mrs. R. J. Wright, of this place, from her husband, Gunner Wright, in France, which will interest many of his Aylmer friends. The British have found it advisable, in fact, essential, to provide games and sports for her gallant soldiers, who engage in them with as much vim and skill as they display in fighting the Germans. The letter is dated June 18 and reads in part:
“Some Canadian mail came through yesterday, and I was rather disappointed when there was nothing for me at noon today from home, but it will no doubt be along in a few days. Yesterday brought letters from Horace [his brother] and Syme [Elgie]. The latter expected to be moved, but still has his bandages on. No doubt he will spend considerable time in some convalescent home before being again put on duty.
Last Thursday we were given a holiday, as the sports for our division were being held about a mile back of our lines, and some of our men were contestants. It was certainly a wonderful sight, and as one fellow said: ‘If Fritz could see the decorations, the flags, the grounds all marked out with whitewashed posts, and the Y.M.C.A. canteens, he’d give up in disgust, and say if those Canadians can carry on the war and still enjoy recreation, they have me beaten’.
Most of the events were with horses, as the men of the different units able to be present were drivers. Jumps had been built, and a prize was given for the best single jump. One horse was extra good, taking all of them (6) with perfect ease, and never shying in the least. Then came the team jumping, riding one horse and leading another. It was a fine sight, especially when the horses went over an imitation green hedge, about four feet high. The tent pegging was good, too. Some eight officers tried it first, but only one was successful in getting the peg. Then a number of N.C.O.’s and men tried and every one got a peg on the first try. It consists of riding a horse at full gallop, and with a lance spearing a peg about six inches long, and two inches wide, stuck lightly in the ground. As there were as many as fourteen and sixteen entries in some events, it took quite a time to get them finished. Another jump which was very pretty consisted of four horses abreast, with a rider on each one, going over together. Four of our men won that event, and it showed good driving. A young fellow from Goderich won what is called the V.C. race. It consisted of running your horse about fifty yards, jumping a three-foot hedge and a four foot trench, then going another fifty and picking up a man (dummy), throwing him across the horse, and riding bac over the jumps, while fellows stand on each side of the trench and fire rifles into the air. The rider is bareback, and of course has to dismount to pick up them an at the other end, both of which tend to make the event much more difficult.
The wagon and six horse team was a wonder. Every working part was shined and polished perfectly. The leather was so clean that every stitch was white, while the horses were matched to perfection. This was a turnout of a British unit, and they are experts on shining. They look upon we Canadians as careless, reckless fellows, who don’t like all their old regimental foolishness, and who don’t intend to try to like it. As for fighting though, they regard us as little short of wonders, and as that is what we came for, that’s the reputation we are anxious to keep. The wagon put in by the 30th Battery was very good though, and I believe it is to be shown when the sports for the whole Canadian Corps come off at some future date.
Today has been a holiday also, with the exception of stables and church parade. It makes the day rather long, but also we get a rest, and have time to get some correspondence answered. The service this morning was exceptionally good, too, but I would enjoy a real service back home. The minister spoke on ‘perseverance’ and divided his talk into three parts. We must bear our own burdens, as each has a duty to perform, and we must not shirk. Then, as we are all different, it is our duty to help out the other fellow where he is weak and we are strong. Lastly we are to ask God to help us in our own tasks, and in that way only can we succeed. It gave me material for thought, and I asked myself what success in life really meant to me. I am trying to realize that God has given me a certain part to play, and if I do that well, and trust in Him, I am a success, even though I am not a thousand other things.
Supper is ready, and the mail man has brought some bags, so perhaps I’ll get a letter. Don’t think I am trying to preach a sermon, as I am not good enough for that.
Mail is here. Two letters of May 22 and May 28.  As ever, Dick.”
A photograph with the following caption was printed in the Aylmer Express, October 17, 1918:
Bombadier R. J. Wright, son of Mayor H. H. Wright. His wife, Mrs. Lyla Wright, of this place, has received the following telegram from the Director of Records: “Sincerely regret to inform you, 333840 Bombadier Richard James Wright, artillery, officially reported admitted casualty clearing hospital, October 1, gunshot wounds, abdomen, forearm, chest.”  Bombadier Wright has been in France for many months and this is the first time he has been wounded. His many friends will hope for his quick and complete recovery.
A letter from “Dick” was printed in the Aylmer Express, November 7, 1918:
LETTER FROM GUNNER DICK WRIGHT
Dear Horace –
Since coming in, this is only the second attempt I have made at a letter. It seems to require considerable effort, both physically and mentally. The doctor said this morning it would be three or four days yet before I would be in shape to travel. The wound is similar to an appendicitis operation, but as the doctor described it just six times as serious because the bowels were cut in six places. I know now a little of what it means to be 99 per cent dead, and just hanging on with the other one.  Have not told them at home how near I was to gone, but there is little need for worry now as careful feeding and nothing to do will bring me around in time.  It will of course take months and we’ll hope I may be fortunate to get a Canadian leave out of it or perhaps the war may be over before I’m in fighting shape again. My arm is a little stiff and weak, the wound is healed perfectly. The one in my small one in my abdomen, this last one just nicely broke the skin.
This is my first experience at hospitals, but it seems hard to imagine a place where I could get better treatment. The orderlies do all they can for your comfort and never seem to tire of the innumerable details of a day. The sisters are Canadian and very careful and efficient. One in this ward is a Hamilton girl, the other somewhere in the West. The sister on night duty is not talkative, so I don’t know where she comes from. The doctor who operated and under whose care I am is a Captain Macbeth from Regina. He is a very clever surgeon, although he looks a couple or three years younger than I do.
Here I have come in contact with the Chaplain Service and one cannot speak too highly of the men. They write home for people and supply us with materials, have a friendly word for the thousands who go down through and a prayer for the seriously wounded. One of the Padres is from Port Arthur and was well acquainted with Rev. A. P. McDonald;  he has been exceptionally kind to me and has always came in every evening and had a short talk and a prayer. The Service are doing a grand work here and many thousands will be benefitted.
Another thing I feel I owe my life to the Red Cross Association. I have been on a diet ever since the 1st and if it hadn’t been for the Red Cross, I would not have had it. And not only do I mean this for myself because there are thousands more like me.
It’s nearly supper time and I’m tired too, so I’ll close. I’ll send my address as soon as I get one. Love to Lyla and the girls, Your loving brother, Dick.
Richard returned from overseas in 1919, arriving in Portland, Maine on April 25.
Richard & Lila were divorced about 1923, and Richard was remarried on July 11, 1927 to Ada L. Stoner (1889-1943). Both were living in Hamilton at the time, but Ada was a Malahide township native, the daughter of Jonas Stoner & Sophia Ball. Following Ada’s death, he was remarried to Agnes Clark.
Richard died on December 25, 1957.  He & Ada are buried in Woodland Cemetery, Flamborough East, Wentworth County. His obituary appeared in the Hamilton Spectator, December 26, 1957:
PROMINENT EDUCATIONIST IN CITY, R. J. WRIGHT DIES
A prominent Hamilton school official and educational authority, Richard James Wright, 67, of 97 Dromore Crescent, died at his residence yesterday.
He was born in Aylmer, Ont., and was a resident of Hamilton for the last 35 years.  A school teacher by profession, Mr. Wright was principal of Memorial, Tweedsmuir, Adelaide Hoodless, Lloyd George Schools.  Mr. Wright retired from the teaching profession in 1955 and became executive secretary of the Big Brother Association until his death.
He was a past president of the Ontario Educational Association 1944-45, a past president of the Public School Men Teachers’ Federation, and a past president of the Hamilton Principal’s Association.
He served overseas in World War I with the 43rd Battery Field Artillery. He was a member of the Dundas Branch of the Canadian Legion.
Mr. Wright was an active member and a deacon of the MacNeill Memorial Baptist Church. A thirty-second degree Mason, he was a member of the Acacia Lodge A.F. & A.M., the Murton Lodge of Perfection, the Hamilton Chapter Rose Croix, and the Hamilton Chapter of the Moore Consistory. He was also a past president of the Hamilton East Kiwanis Club.
Surviving are his wife, the former Agnes Clark; two sons, Robert of Hamilton and Richard at home; two daughters, Mrs. James Irving (Irene) of Hamilton, Miss Nellie at home; and two brothers, Rev. H. W. Wright of Grimsby and the Rev. H. C. Wright of Pennsylvania. Also surviving is one sister, Mrs. S. E. Elgie of Aylmer, Ontario.
The body is at the Swackhamer and Hilts Funeral Home, 1341 Main Street West, for service in the chapel on Friday at 2 p.m. Burial will be in Woodland Cemetery.
 

George Harry Arkell Wrong

307786  Harry Wrong
Harry Wrong was born on August 18, 1895 in Aylmer, the son of James Murray Wrong (1858-1931) & Mary (Minnie) Cecelia Greig Arkell (1864-1924).  James was born at Grovesend, the son of Gilbert Wrong & Christina McKinnon, and was a merchant living in Aylmer when he was married there on October 15, 1890 to Mary Arkell, also of Aylmer, but a native of Port Stanley, the daughter of Henry Arkell & Helen Duncan.  They are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Harry Wrong was a student living at Burwash Hall in Toronto when he enlisted for service on February 10, 1916 in Guelph.  He had served one year as a gunner in the 30th Battery.
Harry wrote a letter to his parents, which was published in the Aylmer Express, April 27, 1916:

PTE. HARRY WRONG TELLS OF TRIP TO LONDON

 

In Six Days’ Leave He Visited Many Places of Historical Interest
Had Afternoon Tea in Tennyson’s Home
The following letter written by Pte. Harry Wrong to his parents, tells of his six days’ leave which he spent in London:
We arrived back from our trip to London last night, and during our six days away we certainly had some time. We left Bramshott on Saturday afternoon, March 2, and reached London about 4 o’clock. Some of the fellows here who had been up the week before, recommended ap lace to us where we could stay, so we took an omnibus and started off to find it.  It was up on Denmark Hill, and we had no trouble in finding it.  We had intended to stay at the Y.M.C.A., but when we saw this place, we were certainly glad we had come here. They gave us a room with four beds, so we were all together. We had afternoon tea about five, and then played billiards until 7, when we had dinner. The meals were great – they seemed like a banquet to us after two weeks of army grub, and when I got into a feather cot at night after a hard straw tick, you can imagine what it felt like. In the evening we went to the Savoy Theatre, and saw a play in which a nephew of Sir Henry Irving’s was the chief actor.
On Sunday a.m. we went to St. Paul’s Cathedral. You can’t imagine the beauty of this church; it exceeded all my expectations. Service apparently goes on all morning here. We left about 12 o’clock in order to get back in time for dinner. We did not go out in the afternoon, as it was late when we got through dinner, and afternoon tea was at five o’clock, and we weren’t taking any chances of missing a meal. We had supper about eight, and then went into the library, where they were having some music.
On Monday morning we went to the Zoological Gardens. This is the finest zoo in the world, and they have every animal here you ever heard of. We had lunch here at a restaurant, and left about 3 o’clock for the Tower. There are a good many interesting things here. We saw the Crown Jewels, went through the White Tower, Bloody Tower, Beauchamp Tower, and a number of others. I am sending you a parcel of books so you can see where we have been and what we have seen. The Crown Jewels are wonderful. I never expect to see anything so beautiful in this line again.
To get to the Tower, you have to cross London Bridge. The bridge is immense, only it is not very high above the Thames, and has to be raised to allow the large boats to pass. We were fortunate in arriving just in time to see the bridge go up. On Monday evening we went to the Gaiety Theatre and saw “Tonight’s the Night”. It was a very good play. Instead of going to a restaurant after the theatre, we used to take bread and jam home and make toast on our grate, and then fill up.
On Tuesday morning we went to the Waxworks. These are one of the wonders of London. There are wax figures here of all the great people of historical importance. I never saw anything so lifelike in my life.  When we went in, there was a policeman standing by the door, and I nearly went up to him to ask him about something, when I saw he was only a wax figure.  They have also here a chamber with relics of Napoleonic times and a chamber of horrors, with wax figures representing all the criminals of present and bygone times. About 4 o’clock Jerry and I went over to the Soldier’s club and had a bath and afternoon tea. In the evening we went to the theatre. We did not have dinner until 7 tonight, so it kept us hustling to get down to the city by 8 o’clock.
On Wednesday morning we went to Westminster Abbey. A guide took us around and showed us the burial places of the Kings and Queens. Royalty are not buried there now.  In the book I sent, you can get a better idea of the Abbey than I can give you. In the afternoon we went to a matinee and say “Joyland”, a small musical comedy. After dinner we went to the theatre again – this time to a play entitled “Bric-a-Brac”. It was very good.
On Thursday we went down to see the Bank of England. This is a very unimposing looking building for its fame. We spent the rest of the morning looking at the stores. In the afternoon we went to the Parliament Buildings. We got into the House of Commons in time to hear Lloyd George speak. After this, a lady got us into the House of Lords. It is very hard to get in there unless you know some member; so we were very fortunate. We heard some of the “big wigs” speak here. In the evening we went to the theatre, as usual.
London is certainly a remarkable city, and quite equalled all I have heard of it.  The way in which they handle the traffic is wonderful – no confusion, and yet there are hundreds of vehicles passing every minute.
On the last morning of our stay, we went up to see Buckingham Palace and the large monument to Queen Victoria. The Crown Prince of Serbia had just arrived to visit in London and there was a great crowd out to welcome him.  Jerry and Bing – they were broke!  -went home at 3 o’clock.  Tom and I stayed until 5:45 and went to a matinee and saw the best show we had seen. It certainly kept us going, and we just caught our train as it was moving out. We arrived back in camp about 8 o’clock, completely broke; but we had had a splendid time.
The next day we went for a long walk, as it was such a beautiful day, to Tennyson’s old home, about four or five miles from here.  It is occupied now by Lord Parker, and is closed to the public except to men in khaki. Every soldier who goes there, they invite in for afternoon tea, and so after we had walked about the grounds for a time we went into the house, and they gave us tea, bread and butter, biscuits and cake. It must keep them busy if they feed every one as well as they did us. After tea they showed us Tennyson’s library. This is one room in the house that has remained just as Tennyson left it. His table and chair, also the pictures on the walls, are the same. The house in on a hill, and the room, which has large French windows, overlooks one of the most beautiful views I have ever seen. The grounds about the house are beautifully kept; the flowers are just beginning to come out. They gave us a cordial invitation to come back. I should like very much to see the place again when everything is in full bloom. During our first two weeks here, it rained every day, but the last two or three days have been fine – almost hot today. I think England is a very pretty country, and I like it very much, only I can’t say I like their climate. I got some Aylmer papers the other day, and we certainly enjoyed them and read them from cover to cover. I don’t think much of English papers. You people probably know far more about the war than we do.
A photograph of Harry with the following caption was printed in the Aylmer Express, October 17, 1918:
Driver Harry Wrong, son of Mr and Mrs Jas. M. Wrong, who returned home last week from France. Driver Wrong enlisted and went overseas with the 43rd Battery, Guelph, in February, 1916, and has seen more than two years’ service in France. He was returned home in order that he may continue his studies in medicine at Toronto University.
Harry returned from overseas in 1918, arriving in Montreal on October 7. He  was married on October 8, 1937 to Jean Grace Barker (1900-1975) in Welland. Harry died in 1976 and is buried with his wife in All Saints Anglican Church cemetery, Stamford Township, Welland County.

Herbert Horace Wyatt

675955
Herbert Wyatt was born on July 7 [or 9], 1883 in London, England, the son of Henry D. Wyatt & Mary E. Hunt.  He emigrated to Canada about 1898 and was living with Preston & Cecilia Scoffin as a domestic servant on the 1901 South Dorchester census.
He was farming at Avon when he was married there on February 24, 1909 to Margaret (Maggie) Ray Cade (1886-1958) also of Avon, the daughter of Alvin Cade & Lily Clement.  They are found on the 1911 census at Avon in South Dorchester with two children, Ellen G. (1909) & Alvin (1910).
Herbert was farming at RR #1 Springfield when he enlisted for service on May 20, 1916 in Tillsonburg.
He died on November 28,  1969 and is buried with his wife in Avon cemetery. Also buried there is their daughter, E. Grace (1909-1983), wife of Arthur Durston.

Leonard Lynde Youell  Leonard Youell

Leonard Youell was born on September 15, 1894 in Aylmer, the son of George Warren Youell (1855-1924) & Alice Jane Burwell (1857-1942), who were married on September 13, 1882 in Port Burwell.  George Youell was born in Middleport, Ontario,  the son of George Youell (born in Ireland) & Teresa (or Clarissa) Warren (born in Whitby, Ontario).  Alice Burwell the daughter of Leonidas & Jane Burwell.  George was a merchant living in Bracebridge at the time of their marriage, while Alice lived in Port Burwell.  George Youell was a dry goods merchant in Aylmer.  He and Alice are buried in Aylmer cemetery.
Leonard was a student in mechanical engineering living in Aylmer when he enlisted for service on January 26, 1916 in Guelph.  He enlisted as a Lieutenant in the 43rd Overseas Battery, C.F.A.  He had served one year in the C.O.T.C. at the University of Toronto, and also belonged to the 30th Battery C.F.A.  His brother, Arthur Warren Youell died on November 12, 1918 from wounds received August 6, 1918.
A photograph of Lieut. Youell with the following article appeared in the Aylmer Express, June 7, 1917:
It was with pardonable pride and pleasure that we read in Friday’s daily papers that another Aylmer boy had brought honour to our town by receiving mention for bravery on the field at Vimy Ridge in despatches from Sir Douglas Haig, Commander in Chief of the British army. The soldier referred to is Lieut. L. L. Youell, son of Mr and Mrs Geo. Youell, of this place. Some time ago, Lieut. Youell secured a pledge from the Express that we would not mention either his name nor his activities at the front, as he felt that anything he might be able to for his country was of no importance to the general public. Since the announcement has been officially made by the Field Marshall, however, we feel justified in also making the announcement. We also had no little difficulty in securing a photo from which to secure the above cut. As this is the first honour of the kind to come to us, we really felt it a duty to our town to make mention of it. At the age of 20, Lieut. Youell gave up his unusually brilliant school career, realizing his country’s need, and after working in a munition factory until ordered to give up this work by a physician, he went to the Kingston Military College, took a ten weeks’ course, and six months later was in action in France, taking part in the Battle of the Somme. Lately his duties have included the coordination of the infantry with the artillery, and giving considerable time to observation post work. He holds lieutenant’s certificates in both the infantry and artillery. His brother, Arthur, also felt the call of duty at the front, and at the termination of a three-year contract with an engineering company employing 2,100 men, which the company, backed by the government, vainly sought to renew, enlisted last October, and in March was wading in liquid mud almost knee deep in France with a composite six-gun battery. The brothers, who are but six miles apart, have met but once.
Leonard was awarded the Military Cross, which was reported in the Aylmer Express, October 25, 1917, accompanied by his photograph:
Lieut. L. L. Youell, M.C., 35th Battery, C.F.A.
An Associated Press cable last week announced that Lieut. L. Youell, son of Mr and Mrs George Youell, of this place, had been awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry at Vimy Ridge, which in results will always be considered one of the most important battles in history. No particulars have come from Lt. Youell, nor his brother, but a former associate in the 43rd (Guelph) battery, with which he went to France, wrote that he had been recommended for the D.S.O. for going over the Ridge with the infantry, which enabled him, as field observation officer, to send back to the artillery most valuable information as to where they could drop their shells to the best advantage.
He wrote that the Huns seemed to proud to fight, and abandoned their personal belongings, among them being women’s skirts. One of his rewards was an armful of souvenirs, among them two spiked helmets, Field glasses and other more valuable things were scattered about in abundance, but it was not permitted to send them away, so they were not gathered up.
The previous mention of Lieut. Youell in despatches of the Field Marshall, Sir Douglas Haig, was for his good work as liaison officer during the battle of the Somme, from July to November 1916. Recently he has been acting as Field Observation Officer, and is now attached to a Quebec Province Battery. His brother, Arthur, has been taken off the guns, and given more important work at headquarters of the 24th Battery.
In another column we give an account of the ordinary work of an observation officer, but it requires something extraordinary to win the Military Cross. In the regular performance of his duties Lt. Youell has taken his observations from posts varying from the cellar of a demolished French chateau, with his batman busy pumping out the water, to an observation balloon some thousands of feet in the air, with a parachute and knife attached to him, the latter to cut himself free from the balloon, should the German anti-aircraft guns put it out of commission.
Leonard’s decoration with a medal was reported in the Aylmer Express, February 20, 1919, accompanied by his photograph:
“Lieut. Leonard L. Youell, son of Mr and Mrs George W. Youell, of this place, who has been awarded the bar to his Military Cross, won for conspicuous bravery on the field. This is equal to winning the cross the second time. The work of Lieut. Youell, who is with the artillery in the Third Division Canadians, has been recognized in each of his three years at the front, by the War Department. He was with the Canadians when they won the last victory at the war at Mons”.
Leonard returned from overseas in 1919, arriving at Quebec on August 6. He later  moved to the United States and was living at 1725 Fairfax Ave., Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia during the 1940’s.  He was employed at the Solway Process Company in Hopewell, Virginia.
A brief biography of Leonard found on the internet contains the following information:
“Leonard Lynde Youell, MC(2), BASc, was born at Aylmer, Ontario, son of George Warren Youell and Alice (Jane) Youell. He was educated at Aylmer schools and at the University of Toronto where he received his BASc in 1920.  In WWI, from 1915 to 1917, he served with the 43rd Battery of the Canadian Field Artillery. From 1917 to 1919 he held the rank of lieutenant and acting captain. In 1917 Leonard Youell was ‘Mentioned in Despatches’ and awarded his first Military Cross (MC) for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His citation reads, in part, as follows: ‘He went forward with the attacking infantry, and on arriving at the final objective immediately established communication from front to rear. By his untiring efforts and disregard of exceptionably heavy shell and machine gun fire, he was able to maintain telephonic communication throughout a critical time, when our left flank was being heavily counter attacked, enabling the artillery to work in perfect co-operation with the infantry, and he was largely instrumental in preventing a breach in our line’. In 1918, while with the 35th Battery of the 10th Brigade, he was awarded his second Military Cross for gallantry and devotion to duty. His citation, reads, in part, as follows: ‘While acting as forward observation officer on September 3rd 1918, during operations on Etaing and L’Ecluse, he with one other observation officer and an infantry officer of the 11th Infantry Brigade went out in advance of the infantry and made a reconnaissance of the town of L’Ecluse. On arriving in the village they found seventeen enemy in dugouts all of whom they took as prisoners. From these prisoners they found that the road running through the village was mined, and placed a sign of warning over it to warn the approaching infantry’.
In 1920, after returning from overseas, Youell began his postwar engineering career with Ingersoll Rand Co. Ltd. at Sherbrooke, Quebec. He rose to become Vice President and General Manager of Stone & Webster Canada Ltd., engineering and construction consultants in Toronto, Ont. Leonard Youell remained unmarried.”
A diary kept by Leonard during the war is housed in the Baldwin Room Manuscripts Collection at Toronto Public Library.
Leonard died on January 9, 1989, according to the United States Social Security Death Index, but a place of death was not given in the record.

Thomas Richard Young

160806
Thomas Young was born on July 27, 1880 at Chiselhampton, Oxfordshire, England, the son of Alfred Young & Frances Maria Humphries, who were married in Oxford in 1875. The family is found on the 1891 census living at 3 Avon Road, Bournemouth, Holdenhurst Parish, Hampshire, England.  He emigrated to Canada in 1909, sailing from Liverpool on the ship Empress of Britain, arriving in St. John, New Brunswick on April 16.  The passenger list gives his destination as “Elmer”.  He is found on the 1911 census in Bayham, working as a labourer with Leslie and Helen Cameron.
Thomas enlisted for service on October 23, 1915 in Calgary. He names his next of kin as his mother, Fanny Young, of ‘Bradley’ 14 Avon Road, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England. He was a clerk and was not married.
A letter from Tom was printed in the Aylmer Express, April 5, 1917:
CALTON MAN WAS IN THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME
Is Now in a Hospital in England. Tells Some of His Experiences
Mrs. Chas. James, of Calton, has received a most interesting letter from Tom R. Young, a former resident of Calton.
England, March 7th 1917
Dear Mrs. James –
I guess you will be surprised to hear that I am in old England. After being in a hospital in France for rather over eleven weeks they sent me here last Friday. They are keeping me in bed for a time. My long sickness in France pulled me down rather much and the doctors said they would send me over here for a good change and rest. I am in a beautiful spot 8 miles out in the country from Chester.  It is one of the Voluntary Aid hospitals and everything is kept up and provided for by ladies.  They do all the work and wait on us. There are some of the best families of England here and they all take their share in the work in turn. We have two ladies that come here and look after us who are daughters of one of the millionaires of this country and they take delight in doing all they can for us. The war which is beautiful, is in a large private home. There are just two of us Canadians here.
The day after I arrived I received a letter from the ladies of the Canadian Red Cross in London, asking me to let them know of anything I wanted or anything they could do for me, and I have had a lady visitor from the Canadian Red Cross to visit, so they sure to look after us. I shall likely be here about a month or more, if all goes well. Then I guess to go to a convalescent, most probably on the sea coast.
I guess it was the fearful trying time that we went through on the Somme that put me aside with sickness, for we sure had one hard and trying time there. I lost an awful bunch of good chums. We came out from there a small bunch I can tell you. Oh gee, it’s hard lines to see your chums fall to rise no more in this world, but it’s all for a just and noble cause, and I’m longing to get well and fit to go back and take my place again.
Well, Mrs. James, I must heartily thank you for your great kindness in helping to send me the box which I received while in the hospital. It sure was good of you both and I can assure you I greatly appreciate your kindness. For out there midst all the scenes of terrible struggle, one sure does feel grateful for such kind actions. I must confess it’s a fearful and trying life. The time we were up at the Somme was a time never to be forgotten. Many a night did we lay down soaked to the skin, in filth and mud. Of course we never had a chance to take our clothes off to dry them, and its marvelous what one can stand. I must say, however, I never seemed to mind it, for always made myself happy and contented, for conditions of things could not be helped, and at the same time one could always feel that there were many who were far worse off. Many a poor chum had to lay for 2, 3, or 4 days wounded, out in No Man’s Land, for ofttimes it was impossible to get to the poor lads.
The first time we went over the top, I mean our battalion, we lost 16 officers and of course men in proportion to that, but I’m glad to say we all went with a good heart, and when sickness or wounds befall us and they can get us back, they certainly look after us. The Nursing Sisters work in the hospitals in France, a work we cannot speak too highly of. I received splendid care during my stay there.
Please remember me to the Timpanys and Geo. Chalk’s, in fact all the old friends again. Thanking you all for your kindness, good luck and God bless you all,
Your old friend, Tom R. Young
No. 160806, 102nd Canadians, Tattenhall Hospital, Chester, Eng.
Thomas returned from overseas in 1917, arriving in Quebec on August 27.
No further information is known.

Lorne Zavitz

3139101
Lorne Zavitz was born on March 26, 1897 in Aylmer, the son of Clinton Zavitz (1865-1921) & Clara Fleming (1876-1961).  Clinton was born in Malahide, the son of Clinton & Elsie Zavitz.  He died in 1921 at lot 13, concession 4 Malahide.  He and Clara are buried in Luton cemetery.
They moved to Fingal where Lorne and his father were farming when he enlisted for service on June 18, 1918 in London.
Lorne was a barber living in Ingersoll when he was married on November 21, 1923 in Tillsonburg, to Bessie Lister Burn, of Tillsonburg, the daughter of William C. Burn & Annie Craigan Kelmer.
Lorne later lived in Tillsonburg and Hamilton.  He died in Cayuga on March 10, 1961. He is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Cayuga.